Beer, Crush, and Family: <p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/144568819605/may-18th-1896-khodynka-tragedy-on-this-day-in" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p>

<blockquote><h2><b>May 18th 1896: Khodynka Tragedy</b></h2><p><small>On this day in 1896, during the festivities celebrating the 
coronation of new Russian Tsar Nicholas II, a mass panic on Khodynka 
Field in Moscow led to 1,389 deaths. A banquet was planned for the 
people which was highly anticipated due to rumours of free beer, 
pretzels and gingerbread. Thousands gathered early in the morning, but a
 rumour spread that there was not enough food for everyone and in the 
ensuing panic and crush, 1,389 were trampled to death and a further 
1,300 injured. The new Tsar visited the injured in hospital but still 
attended a ball at the French embassy in the evening, which many thought 
showed a lack of care for his subjects; Nicholas had not wanted to go 
but his advisors considered it an insult to France. The incident marked
 the beginning of a series of events which undermined faith in Tsar 
Nicholas II and led to his removal from power in 1917, making him the 
last Tsar of Russia. </small></p></blockquote>

<p>Saying Tsar Nicholas II was &ldquo;removed from power&rdquo; seems like an exceedingly polite way to say &ldquo;he and his entire family were brutally murdered&rdquo;.</p>

todayinhistory:

May 18th 1896: Khodynka Tragedy

On this day in 1896, during the festivities celebrating the coronation of new Russian Tsar Nicholas II, a mass panic on Khodynka Field in Moscow led to 1,389 deaths. A banquet was planned for the people which was highly anticipated due to rumours of free beer, pretzels and gingerbread. Thousands gathered early in the morning, but a rumour spread that there was not enough food for everyone and in the ensuing panic and crush, 1,389 were trampled to death and a further 1,300 injured. The new Tsar visited the injured in hospital but still attended a ball at the French embassy in the evening, which many thought showed a lack of care for his subjects; Nicholas had not wanted to go but his advisors considered it an insult to France. The incident marked the beginning of a series of events which undermined faith in Tsar Nicholas II and led to his removal from power in 1917, making him the last Tsar of Russia.

Saying Tsar Nicholas II was “removed from power” seems like an exceedingly polite way to say “he and his entire family were brutally murdered”.