Black History Month, Children, and Family: WE WANT TO
 KEEP OUR
 CHOOL WHITE
<p>Black history month day 21: desegregation poster child Ruby Bridges.</p>

<p>Ruby Nell Bridges Hall was born September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi. She is best known for being the first black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis in 1960. </p>

<p>The Bridges family moved to Mississippi when Ruby was four. When she was six, her parents responded to a proposal from the NAACP to participate in the integration of the New Orleans school system, despite hesitation from her father.</p>

<p>Bridges was one of six black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether they could go to the all-white school, William Frantz Elementary. Two of the six decided to stay at their old school, and the other three were transferred to another district to integrate a different school, so Bridges went to William Frantz by herself. She and her mother had to be escorted to school by four federal marshals during her first year. One of the marshals later remarked: &ldquo;She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn&rsquo;t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we&rsquo;re all very very proud of her.&rdquo;</p>

<p>Though Bridges showed remarkable bravery for a six-year-old, situation was certainly not without its challenges. The marshals would only allow her to eat food brought from her home due to one woman&rsquo;s repeated threats to poison her. Another woman stuck a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and held outside the school in protest. Bridges said later that that frightened her more than any of the things they shouted. She began the practice of praying while she walked, which helped her block out the nasty comments, and she also saw a child psychiatrist named Robert Coles who helped her cope. Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, agreed to teach Ruby and did so for over a year, teaching as though she was teaching the whole class.</p>

<p>Bridges still lives in New Orleans with her husband, Malcolm Hall, and their four sons. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, formed in 1999 to promote &ldquo;the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences&rdquo;. In describing the mission of her foundation, Bridges stated: &ldquo;racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it.&rdquo;</p>

Black history month day 21: desegregation poster child Ruby Bridges.

Ruby Nell Bridges Hall was born September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi. She is best known for being the first black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis in 1960.

The Bridges family moved to Mississippi when Ruby was four. When she was six, her parents responded to a proposal from the NAACP to participate in the integration of the New Orleans school system, despite hesitation from her father.

Bridges was one of six black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether they could go to the all-white school, William Frantz Elementary. Two of the six decided to stay at their old school, and the other three were transferred to another district to integrate a different school, so Bridges went to William Frantz by herself. She and her mother had to be escorted to school by four federal marshals during her first year. One of the marshals later remarked: “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all very very proud of her.”

Though Bridges showed remarkable bravery for a six-year-old, situation was certainly not without its challenges. The marshals would only allow her to eat food brought from her home due to one woman’s repeated threats to poison her. Another woman stuck a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and held outside the school in protest. Bridges said later that that frightened her more than any of the things they shouted. She began the practice of praying while she walked, which helped her block out the nasty comments, and she also saw a child psychiatrist named Robert Coles who helped her cope. Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, agreed to teach Ruby and did so for over a year, teaching as though she was teaching the whole class.

Bridges still lives in New Orleans with her husband, Malcolm Hall, and their four sons. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, formed in 1999 to promote “the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences”. In describing the mission of her foundation, Bridges stated: “racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it.”

Black History Month
Black History Month
Children
Children
family
family
Food
Food
nasty
nasty
Parents
Parents
Protest
Protest
Racism
Racism
respect
respect
Saw
Saw
School
School
Teacher
Teacher
Best
Best
Black
Black
Elementary
Elementary
History
History
Home
Home
Louisiana
Louisiana
Mississippi
Mississippi
Naacp
Naacp
New Orleans
New Orleans
Test
Test
White
White
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Husband
Old
Old
Proud
Proud
Chair
Chair
Courage
Courage
Never
Never
Old School
Old School
Only One
Only One
The All
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Teaching
Teaching
Baby
Baby
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another
another
ruby
ruby
her
her
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foundation
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mother
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poison
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 pass
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 decided
six year old
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First Black
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Black Baby Doll
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September 8
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Wooden
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Four
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In A
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Our
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Had To
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Situation
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While
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Poster
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Frightened
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Black Child
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From
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When She
Barbara
Barbara
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William
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Not
Sons
Sons
Black History
Black History
That
That
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The New
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Repeated
A Lot
A Lot
Coffin
Coffin
When
When
Other
Other
And
And
Little
Little
Moved
Moved
Grown
Grown
participate
participate
mission
mission
over
over
out
out
black children
 black children
six year old
 six year old
decided
 decided
pass
 pass
doll
 doll
two
 two
lives
 lives
year
 year
said
 said
month
 month
later
 later
want
 want
things
 things
cope
cope
bravery
bravery
began
began
determined
determined
integrate
integrate
were
were
allow
allow
values
values
go to
go to
their
their
all white
all white
whimper
whimper
grown up
grown up
hesitation
hesitation
agreed
agreed
went
went
praying
praying
certainly
certainly
remarkable
remarkable
stuck
stuck
appreciation
appreciation
outside
outside
though
though
just
just
different
different
eat
eat
father
father
like
like
stop
stop
more
more
using
using
hall
hall
coles
coles
spread
spread
child
child
block
block
tolerance
tolerance
malcolm
malcolm
for
for
proposal
proposal
still
still
robert
robert
born
born
elementary school
elementary school
stay
stay
comments
comments
orleans
orleans
now
now
baby doll
baby doll
system
system
year one
year one
disease
disease
new
new
they
they
integration
integration
the mission
the mission
nell
nell
first
first
all
all
woman
woman
did
did
crisis
crisis
she
she
soldier
soldier
day
day
three
three
the practice
the practice
september
september
psychiatrist
psychiatrist
ruby bridges
ruby bridges
henry
henry
one
one
who
who
poison
poison
class
class
mother
mother
foundation
foundation
her
her
ruby
ruby
another
another
Black Baby
Black Baby
Baby
Baby
Teaching
Teaching
The All
The All
Only One
Only One
Old School
Old School
Never
Never
Courage
Courage
Chair
Chair
Proud
Proud
Old
Old
Husband
Husband
White
White
Test
Test
New Orleans
New Orleans
Naacp
Naacp
Mississippi
Mississippi
Louisiana
Louisiana
Home
Home
History
History
Elementary
Elementary
Black
Black
Best
Best
Teacher
Teacher
School
School
Saw
Saw
respect
respect
Racism
Racism
Protest
Protest
Parents
Parents
nasty
nasty
Food
Food
family
family
Children
Children
Black History Month
Black History Month

WE WANT TO KEEP OUR CHOOL WHITE <p>Black history month day 21 desegregation poster child Ruby Bridges<p> <p>Ruby Nell Bridges Hall was born September 8 1954 in Tylertown Mississippi She is best known for being the first black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis in 1960 <p> <p>The Bridges family moved to Mississippi when Ruby was four When she was six her parents responded to a proposal from the NAACP to participate in the integration of the New Orleans school system despite hesitation from her father<p> <p>Bridges was one of six black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether they could go to the all-white school William Frantz Elementary Two of the six decided to stay at their old school and the other three were transferred to another district to integrate a different school so Bridges went to William Frantz by herself She and her mother had to be escorted to school by four federal marshals during her first year One of the marshals later remarked &ldquoShe showed a lot of courage She never cried She didn&rsquot whimper She just marched along like a little soldier and we&rsquore all very very proud of her&rdquo<p> <p>Though Bridges showed remarkable bravery for a six-year-old situation was certainly not without its challenges The marshals would only allow her to eat food brought from her home due to one woman&rsquos repeated threats to poison her Another woman stuck a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and held outside the school in protest Bridges said later that that frightened her more than any of the things they shouted She began the practice of praying while she walked which helped her block out the nasty comments and she also saw a child psychiatrist named Robert Coles who helped her cope Only one teacher Barbara Henry agreed to teach Ruby and did so for over a year teaching as though she was teaching the whole class<p> <p>Bridges still lives in New Orleans with her husband Malcolm Hall and their four sons She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation formed in 1999 to promote &ldquothe values of tolerance respect and appreciation of all differences&rdquo In describing the mission of her foundation Bridges stated &ldquoracism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it&rdquo<p> Meme

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