🔥 Popular | Latest

Anaconda, At-St, and Chicago: Clara Belle Williams, the first black graduate of New Mexico State University. Many or her professors would not allow her inside the class room, she had to take notes from the hallway; she was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma. She became a great teacher, of black students by day, and by night she taught their parents (former slaves) home economics. she lived past 100, after her death, NMSU renamed the English Department building after her. Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent College, now (Prairie View A & M University) in 1908. Williams enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928, after taking some courses at the University of Chicago. While she worked as a teacher at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, she also took college courses during the summer. Most of Williams professors did not allow her inside the classroom because she was Black. But that didn’t stop Clara. She had to take notes from the hallway–standing up! That’s right, she wasn’t even given a chair to sit in many of those classes. She was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma because of the segregation laws. Despite what they did or said against her, she still graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from NMSU in 1937 at the age of 51. Williams went on to continue her education beyond her graduation date, taking graduate-level classes well into the 1950s. She married Jasper Williams in 1917. The couple raised three sons. She urged her sons to do well in school and succeed in higher education. All three of her children went to college and graduated with medical degrees. One attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C and the two other children graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They founded the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. . Her eldest son Dr. Jasper Williams, was chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago, a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, past president of the Cook County Physicians Association, and a founding director of the Seaway National Bank of Chicago, now the country’s largest black-owned bank. So you see, if it wasn’t for Clara’s dedication and perseverance, we would have never seen such excellence. via blackdoctor.org ClaraBelleWilliams theblaquelioness

Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent Coll...

Save
Black History Month, Church, and Period: EDOM FROM WANT FREEDOM FROM <p>Black history month day 7: Sculptor Selma Hortense Burke.</p> <p>Selma Burke was born in 1900 in Mooresville North Carolina. The 10th child of an AME church minister, she grew up attending a one room segregated schoolhouse and playing with the riverbed clay near her home. This was what first piqued her interest in sculpture. Her mother thought she should pursue a more financially stable career than one as an artist, but her grandmother was a painter and encouraged her interests.</p> <p>Burke attended Winston-Salem University and graduated from St. Agnes Training School for Nurses in Raleigh in 1924. She moved to Harlem to become a private nurse, and it was there that she began a tumultuous relationship with Jamaican poet Claude McKay and was first exposed to the Harlem Renaissance. </p> <p>Twice Burke traveled to Europe in the 1930s. Once on a Rosenwald fellowship to study sculpture in Vienna for a year, and once to study in Paris with Aristide Maillol. One of her most significant works from this period is &ldquo;Frau Keller&rdquo; (1937), a portrait of a German-Jewish woman in response to the rising Nazi threat which would convince Burke to leave Europe later that year.</p> <p>We she returned to the United States, Burke enrolled at Columbia University, where she earned her Master of Fine Arts degree in 1941.</p> <p>She is pictured here with two of her most famous pieces: A bust of Booker T. Washington, given to Frederick Douglass High School in Manhattan in 1936, and a relief sculpture of President Franklin D. Roosevelt that serves as the template for the American dime to this day.</p>
Save
Black History Month, Definitely, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://ipreferthe-drummer.tumblr.com/post/139685498035/proudblackconservative-since-it-is-black" class="tumblr_blog">ipreferthe-drummer</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/139682882774/since-it-is-black-history-month-whatever-i-may" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Since it is black history month, whatever I may feel on the matter, I decided to share some of the people in black history I find most inspiring:<br/> 1. Sojourner Truth – Slave and eloquent public speaker. Famed for her speech “Ain’t I a Woman?”<br/> 2. Madame CJ Walker – The first female (of any race) self-made millionaire. Made her fortune selling hair care products.<br/> 3. Harriet Tubman – Escaped slave and emancipator of hundreds<br/> 4. Douglas – Former slave, abolitionist, orator, writer, suffragist, and vice presidential nominee<br/> 5. Booker T. Washington – Foremost black educator of the late 19th and early 20th century. Invaluable in southern race relations.</p> <p>These men and women made a huge impact in a time where everything was set against them. Not content to simply be victims or hate their perceived oppressors, they did what they could with what they had to make a difference and we remember them for it today by celebrating the many opportunities that the fought for everyone to have.</p> </blockquote> <p>Have you heard of George Washington Carver? He’s one of my favorite people in American history. He was raised as a slave and went on to become a botanist that made things out of crops in the south that were very common. Often the cash crops such as tobacco would make the land tough to grow things on but he invented so many things to do with peanuts and sweet potatoes that he practically created an entire new market for farmers that wouldn’t hurt their land as much. He’s awesome.</p></blockquote> <p>Yes! I really like him too! This is definitely not an exhaustive list of great African-American history makers :)</p>

ipreferthe-drummer: proudblackconservative: Since it is black history month, whatever I may feel on the matter, I decided to share some of...

Save