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Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy <p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://philtippett.tumblr.com/post/168428590826/ithelpstodream-once-the-children-were-asleep" class="tumblr_blog">philtippett</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/168152017582/once-the-children-were-asleep-sajjad-headed-out" class="tumblr_blog">ithelpstodream</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” </p> <p>The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.</p> <p>“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu">https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu</a></p> </blockquote> <p>this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:</p> <blockquote> <p>…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”</p> <p>The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.</p> <p>Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.</p> <p>“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”</p> <p>[…]</p> <p>Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.</p> <p>“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”</p> <p>The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”</p> </blockquote> </blockquote> <p>What a beautifully loving family. </p> </blockquote> <p>This makes my heart happy </p>

ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims ...

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Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree. “I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled: …she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.” The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says. Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu. “I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.” […] Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left. “It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.” The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.” What a beautifully loving family.

ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims an...

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Being Alone, Community, and Family: dddasss Yesterday Guys, I have no idea why but recently, I've been feeling really depressed. But I have absolutely no reason to be depressed. I am actually not joking. I really need help. I have a loving family, great friends, good grades, but I'm fucking depressed for some reason. 151 Reply ItsJustinM 13 minutes ago Depression comes and goes. Everyone has been down at some point and their life. What I would do if I were you is go out and do something exciting. Set up something fun with your friends that will make you happy. Spending time with your friends and family and having fun is honestly the best way to get through a random stage of depression. (The pornhub community is the best community to come to for anything) Hope all turns out well 1 Reply Jmcy11 1 hour ago You aren't alone mate, there are a lot of people that feel the same way you do. Don't be afraid to go to a counselor and seek help, internalizing your problems won't solve anything, I think you should go talk to someone 1 Reply NightDoll 19 hours ago You have a loving family and friends dont be afraid to ask them for help. You're not alone 5 Reply brandJames 23 hours ago I've been feeling the same way, man. Like WalkerTexasNutter (great name by the way) said, find someone to talk to. The brain is a funny thing, and sometimes shit gets imbalanced up there. Don't let it cut your life short It's not worth it. It's never is. 5 Reply WalkerTexasNutter Yesterday Don't be afraid to seek professional help man. I've been there and asking for help was the hardest damn thing i've ever done but it saved my life. Good luck 1 Reply Sexless SexAddict Yesterday All you need to know, really, is that everything starts within the mind. 21 Reply <p>Even Pornhub can be wholesome via /r/wholesomememes <a href="http://ift.tt/2ydirb8">http://ift.tt/2ydirb8</a></p>
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Berenstain Bears, Books, and Children: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://theavc.tumblr.com/post/126364951791">theavc</a>:</p> <blockquote> <h2><b><a href="http://www.avclub.com/article/how-you-spell-berenstain-bears-could-be-proof-para-223615">How you spell “The Berenstain Bears” could be proof of parallel universes</a></b></h2> <blockquote><p>“You need to look up the Berenst#in Bears problem.”</p></blockquote> <p>It was this innocent comment left on a post about parallel universes that first pulled by <a href="http://www.strangerdimensions.com/2015/01/21/the-berenstin-bears-problem-are-we-living-in-an-alternate-worldline/">Rob Schwarz of </a><i><a href="http://www.strangerdimensions.com/2015/01/21/the-berenstin-bears-problem-are-we-living-in-an-alternate-worldline/">Stranger Dimensions</a> </i>into one of the internet’s strangest theories. It involves The Berenstein Bears,<i> </i>a loving family of anthropomorphized bears who taught children life lessons via hundreds of picture books and two TV shows. But the problem is they aren’t <i>The Berenstein Bears, </i>they’re <i>The Berenstain Bears.</i></p> <p>Though a startling number of people remember the name as BerenstEin, it’s in fact spelled BerenstAin, just like the authors Stan and Jan Berenstain. But is it possible that so many people are just wrong about the title? Back in 2012, <a href="http://woodbetweenworlds.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-berenstein-bears-we-are-living-in.html">blogger Reece</a>offered up another explanation: Some of us have recently crossed over from a parallel universe.</p> <p>He argues:</p> <blockquote><p>… at some time in the last 10 years or so, reality has been tampered with and history has been retroactively changed. The bears <i>really were </i>called the “BerenstEin Bears” when we were growing up, but now reality has been altered such that the name of the bears has been changed post hoc.</p></blockquote> <figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="246" data-orig-width="608"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/d8a52c2fd54b490097fe8868e0ca69db/tumblr_inline_nsvw8gFfCh1r079yu_540.jpg" data-orig-height="246" data-orig-width="608"/></figure><blockquote><p>Somehow, we have all undergone a π/2 phase change in all 4 dimensions so that we moved to the stAin hexadectant, while our counterparts moved to our hexadectant (stEin). They are standing around expressing their confusion about the “Berenstein Bears” and how they all remember “Berenstain Bears” on the covers growing up.</p></blockquote> <p>Those who remember the name as “Berenstain” are native to this “A” Universe, while those who are sure it’s “Berenstein” traveled over from the “E” Universe.</p> <p><b>More at avclub.com</b></p> </blockquote>

theavc: How you spell “The Berenstain Bears” could be proof of parallel universes “You need to look up the Berenst#in Bears problem.” It wa...

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Berenstain Bears, Books, and Children: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://theavc.tumblr.com/post/126364951791">theavc</a>:</p> <blockquote> <h2><b><a href="http://www.avclub.com/article/how-you-spell-berenstain-bears-could-be-proof-para-223615">How you spell “The Berenstain Bears” could be proof of parallel universes</a></b></h2> <blockquote><p>“You need to look up the Berenst#in Bears problem.”</p></blockquote> <p>It was this innocent comment left on a post about parallel universes that first pulled by <a href="http://www.strangerdimensions.com/2015/01/21/the-berenstin-bears-problem-are-we-living-in-an-alternate-worldline/">Rob Schwarz of </a><i><a href="http://www.strangerdimensions.com/2015/01/21/the-berenstin-bears-problem-are-we-living-in-an-alternate-worldline/">Stranger Dimensions</a> </i>into one of the internet’s strangest theories. It involves The Berenstein Bears,<i> </i>a loving family of anthropomorphized bears who taught children life lessons via hundreds of picture books and two TV shows. But the problem is they aren’t <i>The Berenstein Bears, </i>they’re <i>The Berenstain Bears.</i></p> <p>Though a startling number of people remember the name as BerenstEin, it’s in fact spelled BerenstAin, just like the authors Stan and Jan Berenstain. But is it possible that so many people are just wrong about the title? Back in 2012, <a href="http://woodbetweenworlds.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-berenstein-bears-we-are-living-in.html">blogger Reece</a>offered up another explanation: Some of us have recently crossed over from a parallel universe.</p> <p>He argues:</p> <blockquote><p>… at some time in the last 10 years or so, reality has been tampered with and history has been retroactively changed. The bears <i>really were </i>called the “BerenstEin Bears” when we were growing up, but now reality has been altered such that the name of the bears has been changed post hoc.</p></blockquote> <figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="246" data-orig-width="608"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/d8a52c2fd54b490097fe8868e0ca69db/tumblr_inline_nsvw8gFfCh1r079yu_540.jpg" data-orig-height="246" data-orig-width="608"/></figure><blockquote><p>Somehow, we have all undergone a π/2 phase change in all 4 dimensions so that we moved to the stAin hexadectant, while our counterparts moved to our hexadectant (stEin). They are standing around expressing their confusion about the “Berenstein Bears” and how they all remember “Berenstain Bears” on the covers growing up.</p></blockquote> <p>Those who remember the name as “Berenstain” are native to this “A” Universe, while those who are sure it’s “Berenstein” traveled over from the “E” Universe.</p> <p><b>More at avclub.com</b></p> </blockquote>
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Abc, Bad, and Children: PARENTING 9:44am May 5, 2015 Bedtime reading could disadvantage other children, academic says Could snuggling up in bed and reading a bedtime story to your children b bad ng? ninemsn An ABC Radio National program about whether "Having a loving family is an unfair advantage" has questioned whether bedtime reading is causing an uneven playing field for more unfortunate children. 76 <p><a href="http://minority-privilege.tumblr.com/post/118702377020/proudblackconservative-cishetwhiteoppressor" class="tumblr_blog">minority-privilege</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/118702066969/cishetwhiteoppressor-that-moment-when-youre-so" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://cishetwhiteoppressor.tumblr.com/post/118636306691/that-moment-when-youre-so-deluded-your-first" class="tumblr_blog">cishetwhiteoppressor</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>That moment when you’re so deluded, your first reaction upon hearing that reading bedtime stories to children benefits them more than private schooling, is to call it an “unfair advantage”.</p><p><a href="http://www.9news.com.au/national/2015/05/05/09/44/bedtime-reading-could-disadvantage-other-children-academic-says">http://www.9news.com.au/national/2015/05/05/09/44/bedtime-reading-could-disadvantage-other-children-academic-says</a><br/></p></blockquote> <p>Just don’t spend any time with your kids. Don’t read to them. Don’t teach them how to write. Don’t give them affection and nurturing. Let the state handle all of it. The state will take care of them. The state will raise them. Trust the state for everything.</p></blockquote> <p>I could be wrong but I think the guy that wrote that was trying to make a point about how stupid it is to say that private schools should be banned because they present an unfair advantage to children whose families can’t afford private school.</p></blockquote> <p>Was he? I can&rsquo;t find a source on that. Is this like a parody article or something?</p>

minority-privilege: proudblackconservative: cishetwhiteoppressor: That moment when you’re so deluded, your first reaction upon hearing th...

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