🔥 Popular | Latest

lobbygrl: lazypacific: “Imagine you’re at a party. A guy offers you a drink. You say no. He says ‘Come on, one drink!’ You say ‘no thanks.’ Later, he brings you a soda. ‘I know you said you didn’t want a drink, but I was getting one for myself and you looked thirsty.’ For you to refuse at this point makes you the asshole. He’s just being nice, right? Predators use the social contract and our own good hearts and fear of being rude against us. If you drink the drink, you’re teaching him that it just takes a little persistence on his part to overcome your ‘no.’ If you say ‘Really, I appreciate it, but no thanks’ and put the drink down and walk away from it, you’re the one who looks rude in that moment. But the fact is, you didn’t ask for the drink and you don’t want the drink and you don’t have to drink it just to make some guy feel validated.” —The Art of “No” (Jennifer P.) I’ve never seen this post with the original caption before. I thought I loved it simply from the photography but the depth of the meaning behind it…. Wow. : lobbygrl: lazypacific: “Imagine you’re at a party. A guy offers you a drink. You say no. He says ‘Come on, one drink!’ You say ‘no thanks.’ Later, he brings you a soda. ‘I know you said you didn’t want a drink, but I was getting one for myself and you looked thirsty.’ For you to refuse at this point makes you the asshole. He’s just being nice, right? Predators use the social contract and our own good hearts and fear of being rude against us. If you drink the drink, you’re teaching him that it just takes a little persistence on his part to overcome your ‘no.’ If you say ‘Really, I appreciate it, but no thanks’ and put the drink down and walk away from it, you’re the one who looks rude in that moment. But the fact is, you didn’t ask for the drink and you don’t want the drink and you don’t have to drink it just to make some guy feel validated.” —The Art of “No” (Jennifer P.) I’ve never seen this post with the original caption before. I thought I loved it simply from the photography but the depth of the meaning behind it…. Wow.
Save
Animals are incredible: Interesting Fact: Alex the parrot's (A subject of a 37-year experiment) last words to his caretaker were "You be good. I love you. interesting-fact.tumblr.com arry-truman casatoo: sugar-spider: a-whole-clan-of-johnnys: interesting-fact: Source CRY A LOT TRY NOT TO CRY LIE DOWN holy shit dude If you don't know Alex, I suggest you read up on him. Because yeah, sure, any parrot can mimic, but Alex was one of the first to prove on many occasions that he understood the meaning behind the words he said With that in mind, just think about what he said for a sec. Alex had to understand on some level that death means leaving. That's fucking mindblowing. Alex also was shown to have the intelligence of a young child, anywhere from 3 to 5 years old. He could do basic addition and subtraction, and independently taught himself the concept of zero (something that most CIVILIZATIONS couldn't do!) He had a vocabulary of thousands of words, some of which he made up himself, and had deep interpersonal bonds with many scientists and trainers, as well as other parrots. Alex the parrot is basically the coolest bird ever animals are often smarter than you think. There is/was a gorilla they taught sign language to. And one day she asked for a kitten. they gave her a stuffed animal but she signed sad. She wanted a real one. She was allowed to choose one from a litter. She named it All Ball and she loved it Except one day All Ball escaped from the cage and was hit by a car. And this shows you just how much animals can understand. They signed what had happened but didn't think the gorilla would understand. But she started making weeping, howling/crying sounds and the signs for bad, sad, etc. And then "Sleep, cat". She understood death. She's had two kittens since then Animals understand more than you think. Depends on the animal, yes. Animals are incredible
Save
lein-wahliik: appropriately-inappropriate: someoneintheshadow446: rainbownova: otakusapien: shrineart: joyfulldreams: senpaibowie: etirabys: skull-bearer: lolatsjw: ifonlyfor: nouveau-brut: humansofnewyork: “Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular.” I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races.  ^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though. Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good. When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares. Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing. ‘Appropriation’ is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things. Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress. uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook. Thank you!! I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug- Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me. # it’s not like wearing inaccurate and sacred native american clothing or wearing a bindi or a burqa wear you’re doing it disrespectfully and the people of that group is marginalized and made fun of for those things and there is meaning behind them that people ignore or take for granted kimonos are jusr robes and there isn’t really a stigma about people who wear them  (gifs from here) When foreign women come to India we give them pottus and sarees and teach them how to wear them.  Please stop speaking for us, SJWs.  There is a huge difference between wearing an item known for its religious or social significance (for example–a Plains headdress), and wearing something that is just a general item of clothing (like kimono). If you’re wearing it to sexualize it (ie: “sexy kimono” in the fetish scene) or to mock its origin (ie: “sexy geisha Halloween costume!”), then that’s inappropriate. But wearing a kimono in good faith–say to a cherry blossom festival–isn’t in any way cultural appropriation, it’s cultural appreciation. Like, I’m Dominican, and when people want to buy Mascaras de Carnaval, or learn to dance merengue or bachata, it’s not a bad thing. person: hey I find this culture interesting and I would like to learn more about it rather than impose my own culture on them.SJWs: how dare you.: lein-wahliik: appropriately-inappropriate: someoneintheshadow446: rainbownova: otakusapien: shrineart: joyfulldreams: senpaibowie: etirabys: skull-bearer: lolatsjw: ifonlyfor: nouveau-brut: humansofnewyork: “Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular.” I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races.  ^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though. Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good. When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares. Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing. ‘Appropriation’ is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things. Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress. uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook. Thank you!! I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug- Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me. # it’s not like wearing inaccurate and sacred native american clothing or wearing a bindi or a burqa wear you’re doing it disrespectfully and the people of that group is marginalized and made fun of for those things and there is meaning behind them that people ignore or take for granted kimonos are jusr robes and there isn’t really a stigma about people who wear them  (gifs from here) When foreign women come to India we give them pottus and sarees and teach them how to wear them.  Please stop speaking for us, SJWs.  There is a huge difference between wearing an item known for its religious or social significance (for example–a Plains headdress), and wearing something that is just a general item of clothing (like kimono). If you’re wearing it to sexualize it (ie: “sexy kimono” in the fetish scene) or to mock its origin (ie: “sexy geisha Halloween costume!”), then that’s inappropriate. But wearing a kimono in good faith–say to a cherry blossom festival–isn’t in any way cultural appropriation, it’s cultural appreciation. Like, I’m Dominican, and when people want to buy Mascaras de Carnaval, or learn to dance merengue or bachata, it’s not a bad thing. person: hey I find this culture interesting and I would like to learn more about it rather than impose my own culture on them.SJWs: how dare you.
Save
iammissanna: tzikeh: the-fault-in-our-wifi: oh my fucking god Everyone go home. The internet is over. Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay? So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism. One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called “The Treachery of Images,” depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe. The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing. Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me. Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called “Pillz” in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images. Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead. Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.“ It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase. And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.” One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.” None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept. Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.” So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must: have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting. have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting. have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world). have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm. understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor. participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large. So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3 : Bítch 1 míaht be. magritte iammissanna: tzikeh: the-fault-in-our-wifi: oh my fucking god Everyone go home. The internet is over. Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay? So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism. One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called “The Treachery of Images,” depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe. The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing. Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me. Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called “Pillz” in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images. Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead. Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.“ It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase. And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.” One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.” None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept. Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.” So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must: have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting. have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting. have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world). have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm. understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor. participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large. So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3
Save
badmagictattoos: growlbeast: painted-bees: gn-a: Sak Yant or Yantra Tattooing are  believed to give the wearer magic powers associated with healing, luck, strength, and protection against evil. You can get these here in thailand by a monk, they look beautiful but I’d never recommend it. Essentially, you’re making a pact with a spirit to protect you in exchange for sacrificing an activity or habit you may have previously enjoyed (the monk decides what this is, not you). These tattoos are contracts.  Breaking your side of the bargain may encourage the spirit to ‘punish’ you, and these contracts are not easily voided.  Reblogging for the informative caption. A lot of young people want things like this to be cool hipster fucks and they entirely disrespect the meaning behind these ceremonies In tattooing ritual imagery, you are inviting spirits (or types of energy, if you will) into your life. Tattooing ritual imagery on your body is not something to be done lightly and ABSOLUTELY not to be done unless you have deep intellectual, spiritual and communal ties to those rituals. : badmagictattoos: growlbeast: painted-bees: gn-a: Sak Yant or Yantra Tattooing are  believed to give the wearer magic powers associated with healing, luck, strength, and protection against evil. You can get these here in thailand by a monk, they look beautiful but I’d never recommend it. Essentially, you’re making a pact with a spirit to protect you in exchange for sacrificing an activity or habit you may have previously enjoyed (the monk decides what this is, not you). These tattoos are contracts.  Breaking your side of the bargain may encourage the spirit to ‘punish’ you, and these contracts are not easily voided.  Reblogging for the informative caption. A lot of young people want things like this to be cool hipster fucks and they entirely disrespect the meaning behind these ceremonies In tattooing ritual imagery, you are inviting spirits (or types of energy, if you will) into your life. Tattooing ritual imagery on your body is not something to be done lightly and ABSOLUTELY not to be done unless you have deep intellectual, spiritual and communal ties to those rituals.
Save
baaaaoooo: tfw news outlets and media are way more outraged by a celebrity in a cecil the lion costume than they ever were/will be about racist halloween costumes fetishizing and sexualizing people of color and their cultures. so many celebrities have done blackface for halloween and news outlets weren’t /this/ upset. i hate everything : The Huffington Post 6 hrs : Like Page Н No matter the meaning behind it...this is tasteless. Ashley Benson Casually Promoted An Offensive Halloween Costume Offensive Halloween costumes are nothing new. SOCIAL.REFINERY29.COM 352 Likes 442 Comments 56 Shares Share Like Comment Like Page HuffPost Entertainment Н 7 hrs · O First offensive celeb costume of the year, coming right up. Ashley Benson Wore A 'Cecil The Lion' Costume Last Night A poor choice for the "Pretty Little Liars" star. HUFF.TO 80 Likes 61 Comments 15 Shares Like Share Comment t Like Page People.com People 6 hrs · O A friendly reminder to Ashley Benson and the rest of the world: a Cecil the Lion costume is NOT a good idea. Ashley Benson Backtracks After Posing in Controversial Cecil the Lion Halloween Costume Ashley Benson edited her Instagram caption to omit Cecil's name... PEOPLEM.AG 437 Likes 331 Comments 102 Shares Share Like Comment I Like Page Z95.3 Vancouver 7 hrs · O TMZed: People were upset with Ashley Benson from Pretty Little Liars when she posted this lion costume because they think it is too soon since Cecil the Lion. What do you think? itsashbenzo 292k likes 17h itsashbenzo Help! Can't decide on my Halloween costume this year! What do you guys think of this lion costume? @yandy #thanksyandy #halloweencostume 28 Likes 99 Comments 11 Shares Share Like Comment Like Page Seventeen 17 3 hrs · O Here's why people are freaking out about Ashley Benson's Halloween costume. Ashley Benson Criticized for Instagramming a Cecil the Lion Halloween Costume Fans thought it was in poor taste. www.SEVENTEEN.COM 502 Likes 30 Comments 2 Shares Comment Share Like baaaaoooo: tfw news outlets and media are way more outraged by a celebrity in a cecil the lion costume than they ever were/will be about racist halloween costumes fetishizing and sexualizing people of color and their cultures. so many celebrities have done blackface for halloween and news outlets weren’t /this/ upset. i hate everything

baaaaoooo: tfw news outlets and media are way more outraged by a celebrity in a cecil the lion costume than they ever were/will be about...

Save
meme-mage: How Traditional Gender Roles Inspired Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch’s Super Powers Over the course of time the meaning behind the hero has certainly changed. One would have never imagined that heroes thousands of years in the future would have cosmic rings that allow them to fly through space or have an average teenage boy inherit super strength and senses from being bitten from a spider. The heroes and Gods of the past were often a reflection of the culture and humanity during that period of time. You could easily say the same is true today with heroes and villains in X-Men leading the way on social commentary. Despite the continuation of good story telling and commentary, the identity on who can be a hero has changed significantly over time. In today’s day and age anybody can be a hero and can have any super power they desire. Who wouldn’t want to have super strength with flight and the ability to read people’s minds?http://www.everythinggeekdom.com/2015/09/how-traditional-gender-roles-inspired.html Currently looking for writers. If interested, email atcontact@everythinggeekdom.com : meme-mage: How Traditional Gender Roles Inspired Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch’s Super Powers Over the course of time the meaning behind the hero has certainly changed. One would have never imagined that heroes thousands of years in the future would have cosmic rings that allow them to fly through space or have an average teenage boy inherit super strength and senses from being bitten from a spider. The heroes and Gods of the past were often a reflection of the culture and humanity during that period of time. You could easily say the same is true today with heroes and villains in X-Men leading the way on social commentary. Despite the continuation of good story telling and commentary, the identity on who can be a hero has changed significantly over time. In today’s day and age anybody can be a hero and can have any super power they desire. Who wouldn’t want to have super strength with flight and the ability to read people’s minds?http://www.everythinggeekdom.com/2015/09/how-traditional-gender-roles-inspired.html Currently looking for writers. If interested, email atcontact@everythinggeekdom.com

meme-mage: How Traditional Gender Roles Inspired Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch’s Super Powers Over the course of time the meaning behi...

Save
joy-eous: i’ll forget about this in .3 seconds but hey give it a try anyways? #freeblogratesyo: 1: Full name. 2: Zodiac sign. 3:3 fears. 4: 3 things I love. 5: 4 turn on's. 6: 4 turn off's. 7: My best friend? 8: Sexual orientation? 9: My best first date? 10: How tall am I? 11: What do I miss? 12: What time was I born? 13: Favorite color? 14: Do I have a crush? 15: Favorite quote? 16: Favorite place? 17: Favorite food? 18: Do Iuse sarcasm? 19: What am I listening to right now? 20: First thing I notice in new person? 21: Shoe size? 22: Eye color? 23: Hair color? 24: Favorite style of clothing? 25: Ever done a prank call? 26: What color of underwear I'm wearing now? 27: Meaning behind my URL? 28: Favorite movie? 29: Favorite song? 30: Favorite band? 31: How I feel right now? 32: Someone I love. 33: My current relationship status. 34: My relationship with my parents. 35: Favorite holiday 36: Tattoos and piercing I have. 37: Tattoos and piercings I want. 38: The reason I joined Tumblr 39. Last bookIread? 40: Do I ever get good morning" or "good night" texts? 41: Have I ever kissed the last person I texted? 42: When did I last hold hands? 43: How long does it take me to get ready in the mor 44: Have I shaved my legs in the past three days? 45: Where am I right now? 46: If I was drunk & ning .can't stand, who's taking care of me? 47: Do I like my music loud or at a reasonable level? joy-eous: i’ll forget about this in .3 seconds but hey give it a try anyways? #freeblogratesyo

joy-eous: i’ll forget about this in .3 seconds but hey give it a try anyways? #freeblogratesyo

Save