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Gym, Lol, and Tumblr: c-bassmeow: I went to the gym maybe four times this month to lift weights and I’ve already noticed a difference, or I’m delusional. Either way my arms are bigger lol

c-bassmeow: I went to the gym maybe four times this month to lift weights and I’ve already noticed a difference, or I’m delusional. Either ...

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Apparently, Asian, and Bitch: Detroit Rep. Bettie Cook Scott orn Asian opponent: Don't vote for the ching-chong! by Violet lkonomova August 16, 2018 at 11:09 AM comment v bizarre-transmission: thettasigma: ferventfox: awesome-everyday: internetdumpsterfires: Black people can’t be racist. Ugh, okay. The remark by this black woman was disrespectful and based on race. It was rude, bigoted and uncalled for. But no, in an anti black world, black people do not have the social, political or systemic financial power to be racist. Racism implies that beyond hurting and insulting that asian woman that this black woman is connected to a system that has the power to negatively impact this woman’s existence. That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do. And furthermore, there could be an argument made that deteoit is chocolate city and perhaps she does have that infrastructure of black networks to truly effect her opponent, but idk I was in Detroit last year and it looks a lot like Brooklyn does now. White and gentrified. White people with money, who control our political systems, finances, and predominant social narratives are claiming urban space like they’re colonizing pioneers looking to take the new world. Detroit isn’t the same anymore. Anyway, black people can be shitty insensitive bigots but we do not have the social capital to be racist, particularly not in the united states. “That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do.”  Ahahaha: No. A congressperson is the definition of systemic power. You can’t bitch about lack of political power when we are talking about elected politician.  Clearly the world isn’t so anti-black that it couldn’t vote her in.  Chang is also a first generation American, while Scott, to my knowledge, is not, and she specifically made anti-immigrant comments. She also has “power” within the context of her own ethnic community and she used that power to direct racism towards other African-Americans who supported Chang by implying they were somehow traitors, essentially dictating how they ought to act based on their race, particularly Chang’s husband for his interracial marriage (I don’t give a flying fuck what race you are, negative comments about interracial marriage and mixed race people are racist. period. end of story).  Even if I did accept the prejudice + power model or racism (which I don’t as that is neither the etymology or common usage of the word) Cook’s comments would certainly fit the bill. She made race based attacks on people based on types of marginalization that she is exempt from; and did so from a position of power partially gained by the fact that she is exempt from these types of discrimination.   It’s racist. Stop making excuses.  “That dark skinned woman who’s an incumbent running for office likely has about the same amount of systematic power as I do.” Is this person on drugs? They’re claiming that… A political person… A congresswoman… Has no power in the country in which she was elected… By the populace… As a politician. That, or they’re a politician too. Apparently we can say anything now and it makes sense. Huh. Also these remarks are the absolute epitomy of racism and if anyone refuses to see it, they’re not purely misinformed. They are delusional. *literally calls an Asian person ching chong*“How dare you say I’m being racist??” Thank you for attending today’s lecture on cognitive dissonance.
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Baseball, Carrie Fisher, and Complex: <p><a href="https://jackofallwhatsnew.tumblr.com/post/175181801577/an-average-sized-person-ineedfeminismbecuz" class="tumblr_blog">jackofallwhatsnew</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175180661577/ineedfeminismbecuz-an-average-sized-person" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://ineedfeminismbecuz.tumblr.com/post/175175790460/an-average-sized-person-celticpyro" class="tumblr_blog">ineedfeminismbecuz</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175175012287/celticpyro-devil-may-cry-baby" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://celticpyro.tumblr.com/post/175174833629/devil-may-cry-baby-an-average-sized-person" class="tumblr_blog">celticpyro</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://devil-may-cry-baby.tumblr.com/post/175168215330/an-average-sized-person-fullmetal-fabulous" class="tumblr_blog">devil-may-cry-baby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175167710562/fullmetal-fabulous-sleepyyseraph" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://fullmetal-fabulous.tumblr.com/post/174915311987/sleepyyseraph-adamneilcallaby-oarv-going" class="tumblr_blog">fullmetal-fabulous</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://sleepyyseraph.tumblr.com/post/165253576641/adamneilcallaby-oarv-going-through-day-after" class="tumblr_blog">sleepyyseraph</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://adamneilcallaby.tumblr.com/post/162640635063" class="tumblr_blog">adamneilcallaby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://oarv.tumblr.com/post/157964421887/going-through-day-after-day-of-excruciating-work" class="tumblr_blog">oarv</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>“Going through day after day of excruciating work was almost unbearable. Jack Nicholson’s character had to be crazy and angry all the time. And in my character I had to cry 12 hours a day, all day long, the last nine months straight, five or six days a week. I was there a year and a month, and there must be something to Primal Scream therapy, because after the day was over and I’d cried for my 12 hours … After all that work, hardly anyone even criticized my performance in it, even to mention it, it seemed like. The reviews were all about Kubrick, like I wasn’t there.” - Shelly Duvall, December 1980</p></blockquote> <p>To give a little more perspective on just how horrific this film was, I need to give people some information:</p> <p>Since retiring from acting in 2002, Shelley Duvall has lived a reclusive and isolated life. However, in November of 2016, <i><b>USA Today</b></i> reported that she appeared to be suffering from mental illness. And then later that month, to an incredible amount of hype, Shelley appeared on the <i><b>Dr. Phil</b></i> show where she basically looked unrecognisable, seemed delusional and talked about people trying to kill her. The episode basically confirmed there rumours.<br/></p> <p>You can find videos/clips of the interview on youtube, however I won’t link it because it’s upsetting and disrespectful.</p> <p>After the interview aired, Vivian Kubrick, daughter of <i><b>The Shining</b></i> director Stanley Kubrick, described the interview as “exploitative entertainment” and “appallingly cruel”. The show then received a lot of backlash (rightly so) and a number of other chat shows started discussing it (again, there’s some videos of these on youtube)</p> <p>Now, how does this all connect to <b>The Shining, </b>you ask? To quote Wikipedia:</p> <p>“Jack Nicholson states in the documentary <i><b>Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures</b></i>, that Kubrick was great to work with but that he was “<i>a different director</i>” with Duvall. Because of Kubrick’s methodical nature, principal photography took a <i>year</i> to complete. Kubrick and Duvall <i>argued frequently</i>, although Duvall later said she learned more from working with Kubrick on <i>The Shining</i> than she did on all her earlier films. In order to give <i>The Shining</i> the psychological horror it needed, director Stanley Kubrick <i>antagonised his actors.</i> The film’s script was changed so often that Nicholson stopped reading each draft. Kubrick <i><b>intentionally isolated Duvall and argued with her often.</b></i> Duvall was <i><b>forced to perform the iconic and exhausting baseball bat scene 127 times</b></i>. Afterwards, Duvall presented Kubrick with <i><b>clumps of hair that had fallen out due to the extreme stress of filming</b></i>.”</p> <p>One year of solid filming. She had to cry, panic and be scared for 12 hours a day, seven days a week, nine months straight. She was isolated and antagonised by the director. She had to perform the baseball bat scene 127 times in a row (that’s her crying and screaming, and Jack Nicholson being hit) And to top it all of, Jack and Kubrick get all the attention while she gets ignored?</p> <p>From my own personal experience of mental illness, being exposed to feelings of fear and distress for prolonged periods of time can cause the brain to learn and expect it. I’m not saying that filming <i>The Shining</i> caused Shelley Duvall to develop mental illness, I am <i><b>stating</b></i> that whether the movie brought out an existing condition, or prepared the bed for something to eventually develop, filming <i>The Shining</i> has a direct correlation with Shelley Duvall suffering from mental illness.</p> <p>Next time you watch the movie, bare that in mind. It’s much sadder.</p> <p><i>Side note: Three years prior to filming, her partner of two years, Paul Simon, walked off with her friend <b>Carrie Fisher</b>, after she introduced the two. So there’s that too.</i></p> </blockquote> <p>Far too many directors love/loved tormenting their lead actresses. Hitchcock, Lars von Trier, David O. Russell, Bertolucci, Abdellatif Kechiche, and many more. What’s especially insulting to Duvall is that not only was she subjected to this treatment, but her performance has been largely unappreciated and even often ridiculed. </p> </blockquote> <p>This is why any time people say what a ~masterpiece~ the shining is I have to roll my eyes. It’s especially frustrating when the convo is “lol yeah kubrik was the worst, but made a really good movie.” No, kubrik was awful, it’s awful and it’s shameful to celebrate that, period.</p> </blockquote> <p>(Not so) Fun fact: Stanley Kubrick was a far-right social darwinist who considered democracy “a noble failure”. It shows.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another fun fact: Stephen King HATES Kubrick’s The Shining because of how it portrayed Shelley’s character. He has said that Kubrick’s version made her into a sexist stereotype and not at all like the woman he wrote in his novel.</p> </blockquote> <p style="">God that’s awful.</p> <p>And you know, maybe people didn’t like her performance because she just looked like a wreck constantly, so Kubrick’s “method acting” actually made it worse. <br/></p> </blockquote> <p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>And you somehow have the fucking idiocy to be an anti-feminist?</p> </blockquote> <p>My dude, this has fuck all to do with feminism. Especially third wave feminism.</p> </blockquote> <p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>It has literally everything to do with feminism. Patriarchal society let Kubrick get away with it because he was a Genius™ and turned Shelley Duvall into a punchline.</p> </blockquote> <p>Female actors aren’t the only people who have awful experiences. Male actors have been abused as well and been documented many of times.(<a href="http://madamenoire.com/492931/men-who-were-sexually-assaulted/">x</a>)(<a href="https://screenrant.com/times-actors-were-completely-abused-on-movie-sets/">x</a>) Actors in general has had a history of abuse with their directors, from horrible treatments to sexual abuse for both male and female. Kubrick has abused his male actors too, but of course didn’t know that in our patriarchal society no didn’t you. This has nothing to do with feminism but directors being dicks to their actors for their personal gain or for their art. Get over yourself.</p></blockquote> <p>Directors being cruel megalomaniacs with a God complex is nothing new and certainly not exclusive to female actresses.</p><p>Also</p><p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>Saying everything like this</p><p>doesn’t make your point any stronger <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/mWk_Fago5SyKpyXk-KOUmbw">@an-average-sized-person</a> </p>
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Baseball, Carrie Fisher, and Clothes: <p><a href="http://celticpyro.tumblr.com/post/175174833629/devil-may-cry-baby-an-average-sized-person" class="tumblr_blog">celticpyro</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://devil-may-cry-baby.tumblr.com/post/175168215330/an-average-sized-person-fullmetal-fabulous" class="tumblr_blog">devil-may-cry-baby</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175167710562/fullmetal-fabulous-sleepyyseraph" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://fullmetal-fabulous.tumblr.com/post/174915311987/sleepyyseraph-adamneilcallaby-oarv-going" class="tumblr_blog">fullmetal-fabulous</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://sleepyyseraph.tumblr.com/post/165253576641/adamneilcallaby-oarv-going-through-day-after" class="tumblr_blog">sleepyyseraph</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://adamneilcallaby.tumblr.com/post/162640635063" class="tumblr_blog">adamneilcallaby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://oarv.tumblr.com/post/157964421887/going-through-day-after-day-of-excruciating-work" class="tumblr_blog">oarv</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>“Going through day after day of excruciating work was almost unbearable. Jack Nicholson’s character had to be crazy and angry all the time. And in my character I had to cry 12 hours a day, all day long, the last nine months straight, five or six days a week. I was there a year and a month, and there must be something to Primal Scream therapy, because after the day was over and I’d cried for my 12 hours … After all that work, hardly anyone even criticized my performance in it, even to mention it, it seemed like. The reviews were all about Kubrick, like I wasn’t there.” - Shelly Duvall, December 1980</p></blockquote> <p>To give a little more perspective on just how horrific this film was, I need to give people some information:</p> <p>Since retiring from acting in 2002, Shelley Duvall has lived a reclusive and isolated life. However, in November of 2016, <i><b>USA Today</b></i> reported that she appeared to be suffering from mental illness. And then later that month, to an incredible amount of hype, Shelley appeared on the <i><b>Dr. Phil</b></i> show where she basically looked unrecognisable, seemed delusional and talked about people trying to kill her. The episode basically confirmed there rumours.<br/></p> <p>You can find videos/clips of the interview on youtube, however I won’t link it because it’s upsetting and disrespectful.</p> <p>After the interview aired, Vivian Kubrick, daughter of <i><b>The Shining</b></i> director Stanley Kubrick, described the interview as “exploitative entertainment” and “appallingly cruel”. The show then received a lot of backlash (rightly so) and a number of other chat shows started discussing it (again, there’s some videos of these on youtube)</p> <p>Now, how does this all connect to <b>The Shining, </b>you ask? To quote Wikipedia:</p> <p>“Jack Nicholson states in the documentary <i><b>Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures</b></i>, that Kubrick was great to work with but that he was “<i>a different director</i>” with Duvall. Because of Kubrick’s methodical nature, principal photography took a <i>year</i> to complete. Kubrick and Duvall <i>argued frequently</i>, although Duvall later said she learned more from working with Kubrick on <i>The Shining</i> than she did on all her earlier films. In order to give <i>The Shining</i> the psychological horror it needed, director Stanley Kubrick <i>antagonised his actors.</i> The film’s script was changed so often that Nicholson stopped reading each draft. Kubrick <i><b>intentionally isolated Duvall and argued with her often.</b></i> Duvall was <i><b>forced to perform the iconic and exhausting baseball bat scene 127 times</b></i>. Afterwards, Duvall presented Kubrick with <i><b>clumps of hair that had fallen out due to the extreme stress of filming</b></i>.”</p> <p>One year of solid filming. She had to cry, panic and be scared for 12 hours a day, seven days a week, nine months straight. She was isolated and antagonised by the director. She had to perform the baseball bat scene 127 times in a row (that’s her crying and screaming, and Jack Nicholson being hit) And to top it all of, Jack and Kubrick get all the attention while she gets ignored?</p> <p>From my own personal experience of mental illness, being exposed to feelings of fear and distress for prolonged periods of time can cause the brain to learn and expect it. I’m not saying that filming <i>The Shining</i> caused Shelley Duvall to develop mental illness, I am <i><b>stating</b></i> that whether the movie brought out an existing condition, or prepared the bed for something to eventually develop, filming <i>The Shining</i> has a direct correlation with Shelley Duvall suffering from mental illness.</p> <p>Next time you watch the movie, bare that in mind. It’s much sadder.</p> <p><i>Side note: Three years prior to filming, her partner of two years, Paul Simon, walked off with her friend <b>Carrie Fisher</b>, after she introduced the two. So there’s that too.</i></p> </blockquote> <p>Far too many directors love/loved tormenting their lead actresses. Hitchcock, Lars von Trier, David O. Russell, Bertolucci, Abdellatif Kechiche, and many more. What’s especially insulting to Duvall is that not only was she subjected to this treatment, but her performance has been largely unappreciated and even often ridiculed. </p> </blockquote> <p>This is why any time people say what a ~masterpiece~ the shining is I have to roll my eyes. It’s especially frustrating when the convo is “lol yeah kubrik was the worst, but made a really good movie.” No, kubrik was awful, it’s awful and it’s shameful to celebrate that, period.</p> </blockquote> <p>(Not so) Fun fact: Stanley Kubrick was a far-right social darwinist who considered democracy “a noble failure”. It shows.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another fun fact: Stephen King HATES Kubrick’s The Shining because of how it portrayed Shelley’s character. He has said that Kubrick’s version made her into a sexist stereotype and not at all like the woman he wrote in his novel.</p> </blockquote> <p style="">God that’s awful.</p><p>And you know, maybe people didn’t like her performance because she just looked like a wreck constantly, so Kubrick’s “method acting” actually made it worse. <br/></p></blockquote> <p>Oh yeah during a bird attack scene Hitchcock tied a bunch of fucking live birds onto Tippi Hedren’s clothes while handlers threw more birds at her and he didn’t let her take a break until one of them nearly poked her damn eye out and she outright refused to continue filming the scene and her doctor basically forced Hitchcock to let her take a bed rest. He was pretty fucked up too.</p>
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Anna, Brains, and Church: SKILL HARD WORK TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF SKILL IN ANYTHING YOU HAVE TO STAND ON A PILLAR OF HARD WORK. OH, I JUST STARTED HERE TALENT & I HARD WORK TALENTHARD WORK owLTURD.com violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”. I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated:  Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever.  What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring.  It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach.  Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever.  The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes).  For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all.  In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it.  In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it).  Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math.  The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed.   And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.)  And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her.  I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw.  You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna.  But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist.  So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want.  The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust.  But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys.  We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 
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