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kentuckwitch: missmeanest: hubbabubba-overlord: discoursegrips: cistrendered: democratic-bias: electoralcollege: trashgender-garbabe-nova: ladygolem: probablyasocialecologist: https://twitter.com/baldinternetman/status/793470278953238528  Funny enough, there’s a long history of worker’s struggle in the Appalachians and South. Redneck Revolt is a good group organizing in these areas around this identity and history. Yeah regions where mining, agriculture, and similar industries are dominant tend to have a history of socialist organizing and labor agitation, funny how that works i love how many people are commenting on this basically saying it’s an oxymoron for rednecks to be communists like… in what universe is it an oxymoron for… actual poor and working-class people… to be invested in an ideology movement that centers around working-class/labor struggle… lmao ???? literally the only reason why there has been a shift in later years is cus of fear mongering to the point where capitalist criticism has become a taboo even for lower class poor people. like many the southern states are some of the poorest states in usa?? “Let’s show these fascists what a couple of hillbillies can do!”  -Woody Guthrie coming from  a non-informed point of view i feel like once again this is Reagan’s fault because he targeted workers unions a good deal…  People are saying its a oxymoron because “redneck” is usually synonymous with “racist/stupid af” in america. And “racist/stupid af” in america tends to steer very far right. But there is a actually a whole population of “redneck” that isnt racist at all. They’re actually pretty well educated, theyre just poor and do poor people stuff. They’re the ones who end up introducing black people to white people shit. Like moonshine, mudding and camping. Theyre a trip to hang around. Theres actually a lot of overlap in the “redneck” and the “hood” culture (large tight knit families, general disdain for authorities, love of bbq…etc), but the rich white people in power dont want people to know that because if the all the poor people reguardless of color realize they have shared interests band together and raise hell. Its over for the 1%. So they try their hardest to emphasize and exaggerate the cultural differences, in hopes of convincing the low income disenfranchized whites to vote right. I LOVE capitalist critical Appalachian culture. One of the first things i learned that fueled my interest was the origin of the word ‘redneck.’ Coal mining was HUGE from the mid 1700s to the early 1900s in states like Virginia and Pennsylvania as coal was a primary source of fuel for a lotta shit. Unsurprisingly, mine owners were capitalist pigs and exploited the hell outta coal miners. Like, paying them by the pound of coal they brought in rather than by hours worked, paying them in vouchers that could only be used at the store owned by the mining company, and offering no kind of health assistance when workers would inevitably succumb to illness and injury caused by the work they did. So miners began to unionize in the mid 1840s. To show solidarity and to make their employers take notice, unionists would wear red bandanas around their necks. And thus, the term ‘redneck’ was coined to describe the union supporters who eventually dismantled a lot of the exploitive practices used by the coal industry. Love these! Just discovered the hillbilly leftie podcast the Trillbilly Worker’s Party, and I am so excited to see more leftist organizing in these parts. We have an amazing history of labor struggle, and a fair amount of labor wins, in this region. : Bout near tarred a you, boy! kentuckwitch: missmeanest: hubbabubba-overlord: discoursegrips: cistrendered: democratic-bias: electoralcollege: trashgender-garbabe-nova: ladygolem: probablyasocialecologist: https://twitter.com/baldinternetman/status/793470278953238528  Funny enough, there’s a long history of worker’s struggle in the Appalachians and South. Redneck Revolt is a good group organizing in these areas around this identity and history. Yeah regions where mining, agriculture, and similar industries are dominant tend to have a history of socialist organizing and labor agitation, funny how that works i love how many people are commenting on this basically saying it’s an oxymoron for rednecks to be communists like… in what universe is it an oxymoron for… actual poor and working-class people… to be invested in an ideology movement that centers around working-class/labor struggle… lmao ???? literally the only reason why there has been a shift in later years is cus of fear mongering to the point where capitalist criticism has become a taboo even for lower class poor people. like many the southern states are some of the poorest states in usa?? “Let’s show these fascists what a couple of hillbillies can do!”  -Woody Guthrie coming from  a non-informed point of view i feel like once again this is Reagan’s fault because he targeted workers unions a good deal…  People are saying its a oxymoron because “redneck” is usually synonymous with “racist/stupid af” in america. And “racist/stupid af” in america tends to steer very far right. But there is a actually a whole population of “redneck” that isnt racist at all. They’re actually pretty well educated, theyre just poor and do poor people stuff. They’re the ones who end up introducing black people to white people shit. Like moonshine, mudding and camping. Theyre a trip to hang around. Theres actually a lot of overlap in the “redneck” and the “hood” culture (large tight knit families, general disdain for authorities, love of bbq…etc), but the rich white people in power dont want people to know that because if the all the poor people reguardless of color realize they have shared interests band together and raise hell. Its over for the 1%. So they try their hardest to emphasize and exaggerate the cultural differences, in hopes of convincing the low income disenfranchized whites to vote right. I LOVE capitalist critical Appalachian culture. One of the first things i learned that fueled my interest was the origin of the word ‘redneck.’ Coal mining was HUGE from the mid 1700s to the early 1900s in states like Virginia and Pennsylvania as coal was a primary source of fuel for a lotta shit. Unsurprisingly, mine owners were capitalist pigs and exploited the hell outta coal miners. Like, paying them by the pound of coal they brought in rather than by hours worked, paying them in vouchers that could only be used at the store owned by the mining company, and offering no kind of health assistance when workers would inevitably succumb to illness and injury caused by the work they did. So miners began to unionize in the mid 1840s. To show solidarity and to make their employers take notice, unionists would wear red bandanas around their necks. And thus, the term ‘redneck’ was coined to describe the union supporters who eventually dismantled a lot of the exploitive practices used by the coal industry. Love these! Just discovered the hillbilly leftie podcast the Trillbilly Worker’s Party, and I am so excited to see more leftist organizing in these parts. We have an amazing history of labor struggle, and a fair amount of labor wins, in this region.
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Kevin Smith, aka Silent Bob, teaches us not to judge a book by its cover: Kevin Smith Like Page April 10,2016 I am a profiling asshole. Here's how I know: yesterday, I was traveling to #iowacity with a layover at the sprawling #Dallas airport. I had an hour to kill before my next light sol rolled up on a crowded @pappasitos and asked for a table for one. The hostess seated me next to an older couple who quietly sat across from one another. Based on nothing more than a one second observation, I clocked them as a pair of white hairs who'd been married so long that they'd run out of shit to talk to each other about while eating at a restaurant. I ordered fajitas and put in my earbuds, checking emails and listening to #digitalunderground until the food arrived. Then, as I was about to eat, I felt a tap on my arm. I pulled my earbuds out to hear the older man say "Mr. Smith. I hate to bother you, but can I get a picture?" was gobsmacked. Here I was reducing these folks to a stereotype, but they were only being quiet because they were like "Holy shit. it's Silent Bob.." We talked all through our meals and I learned that Marty & Patti Hansen of #Oklahoma knew a good deal of my work, turned onto it by their son. They were such lovely folks that when the check came, I thought "I'm gonna rock their tiny white-haired world by paying for their meal." But no check came for me because THEY bought MY meal. I was double gobsmacked, then gobsmacked a third time when I realized that even after l'd met and spoke with the Hansens, I was still profiling these fine folks by assuming l'd impress them if I picked up their tab. But in the end, Marty & Patty made an impression on me, as well as reminded me not to judge any book by the cover. Plus: free #fajtas! #Kevin Smith Kevin Smith, aka Silent Bob, teaches us not to judge a book by its cover
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iammissanna: tzikeh: the-fault-in-our-wifi: oh my fucking god Everyone go home. The internet is over. Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay? So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism. One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called “The Treachery of Images,” depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe. The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing. Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me. Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called “Pillz” in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images. Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead. Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.“ It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase. And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.” One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.” None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept. Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.” So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must: have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting. have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting. have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world). have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm. understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor. participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large. So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3 : Bítch 1 míaht be. magritte iammissanna: tzikeh: the-fault-in-our-wifi: oh my fucking god Everyone go home. The internet is over. Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay? So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism. One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called “The Treachery of Images,” depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe. The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing. Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me. Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called “Pillz” in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images. Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead. Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.“ It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase. And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.” One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.” None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept. Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.” So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must: have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting. have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting. have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world). have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm. understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor. participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large. So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3
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ais4antjuanette: abovetheignorance: inhale-the-frost: teavibes: christel-thoughts: httpmoonchild: jaded-sage: skindeeptales: 1. Do your research when choosing a tattoo and an artist. Don’t rush yourself when choosing an idea. You’re going to have to live with it forever. Most artists have a speciality, think about this when choosing one. If you want a photorealistic tattoo don’t choose an artist who specializes in American Traditional, for example. Don’t ask to have your neck/face/hands tattooed if it’s your first tattoo, you will most likely be denied. Look into the cost of the tattoo before walking into the shop, don’t sacrifice the tattoo you want to get a good deal. Save up to get the right ink. Be prepared to be placed on a large wait list for the more popular artists. 2. Prepare properly on the day you get your tattoo. Eat a full meal beforehand. Many artists recommend drinking orange juice prior to getting inked. Don’t drink alcohol beforehand. Getting tattooed is a pretty intimate experience, don’t forget to shower. 3. Bring a good reference photo. Bring in a high res photo if possible; at the very least a picture that is big and not blurry. 4. Don’t bring your entourage to the shop with you. It’s fine to bring a friend to hold your hand, any more than one is rude and obnoxious. Children are not permitted in most tattoo shops, leave them at home. 5. Trust your artist.  The artist knows what they are doing, there is no need to be a “backseat driver.” 6. Check out the stencil design, body placement, and spelling before the tattoo begins. via Inked Magazine Inked Magazine If you see something, say something. You aren’t going to hurt anyone’s feelings if you tell them that something is spelled incorrectly. 7. Be prepared to go through some pain, tattoos hurt. Don’t be afraid to tell your artist that you need to take a break if the pain is too much. Nobody wants a passed out client. Ribs, feet, hands, head, and the spine all really hurt. 8. Stay still! We know that it might be difficult to do so, but make every effort to remain as calm and still as possible while getting tattooed. If you are jittery the artist won’t be able to create straight lines. 9. Tip your artist. Most artists don’t own their shops and have to pay a percentage of the tattoo price to the shop. Tipping anywhere between 10-20% should be fine. If you really love the work don’t be afraid of tipping extra. 10. Take care of your tattoo once you leave the shop. Tattoo aftercare is a crucial step in assuring you have a good tattoo. Tattoos will scab and they should heal in 2-3 weeks. Avoid sun and going in bodies of water for the first 2 weeks. Keep the tattoo moist and clean as it heals. Once it’s healed don’t forget to use SPF 50 sunscreen when going outside, you don’t want your tattoo to fade. via Inked Magazine For future reference! THANKKKKK YOUUUUUU that foot tattoo was THE MOST PAINFUL BULLSHIT I HAD EVER EXPERIENCED and it was my 7th freaking tattoo.  i wish i’d seen something like this before hand to at least prepare myself.  I had ZERO pain with my foot tattoo.. but this is a great guide!!!! Gearing up for my ankle and this makes me at ease I’ve got some work in the blue zones, and that shit is no joke. Please don’t rush and get your tattoo, PLEASE. : 10 Rutes of Getting INHEA A Tatroo 00 Calte Wanna see how bad a tattoo will hurt? Pass Out Irritation ais4antjuanette: abovetheignorance: inhale-the-frost: teavibes: christel-thoughts: httpmoonchild: jaded-sage: skindeeptales: 1. Do your research when choosing a tattoo and an artist. Don’t rush yourself when choosing an idea. You’re going to have to live with it forever. Most artists have a speciality, think about this when choosing one. If you want a photorealistic tattoo don’t choose an artist who specializes in American Traditional, for example. Don’t ask to have your neck/face/hands tattooed if it’s your first tattoo, you will most likely be denied. Look into the cost of the tattoo before walking into the shop, don’t sacrifice the tattoo you want to get a good deal. Save up to get the right ink. Be prepared to be placed on a large wait list for the more popular artists. 2. Prepare properly on the day you get your tattoo. Eat a full meal beforehand. Many artists recommend drinking orange juice prior to getting inked. Don’t drink alcohol beforehand. Getting tattooed is a pretty intimate experience, don’t forget to shower. 3. Bring a good reference photo. Bring in a high res photo if possible; at the very least a picture that is big and not blurry. 4. Don’t bring your entourage to the shop with you. It’s fine to bring a friend to hold your hand, any more than one is rude and obnoxious. Children are not permitted in most tattoo shops, leave them at home. 5. Trust your artist.  The artist knows what they are doing, there is no need to be a “backseat driver.” 6. Check out the stencil design, body placement, and spelling before the tattoo begins. via Inked Magazine Inked Magazine If you see something, say something. You aren’t going to hurt anyone’s feelings if you tell them that something is spelled incorrectly. 7. Be prepared to go through some pain, tattoos hurt. Don’t be afraid to tell your artist that you need to take a break if the pain is too much. Nobody wants a passed out client. Ribs, feet, hands, head, and the spine all really hurt. 8. Stay still! We know that it might be difficult to do so, but make every effort to remain as calm and still as possible while getting tattooed. If you are jittery the artist won’t be able to create straight lines. 9. Tip your artist. Most artists don’t own their shops and have to pay a percentage of the tattoo price to the shop. Tipping anywhere between 10-20% should be fine. If you really love the work don’t be afraid of tipping extra. 10. Take care of your tattoo once you leave the shop. Tattoo aftercare is a crucial step in assuring you have a good tattoo. Tattoos will scab and they should heal in 2-3 weeks. Avoid sun and going in bodies of water for the first 2 weeks. Keep the tattoo moist and clean as it heals. Once it’s healed don’t forget to use SPF 50 sunscreen when going outside, you don’t want your tattoo to fade. via Inked Magazine For future reference! THANKKKKK YOUUUUUU that foot tattoo was THE MOST PAINFUL BULLSHIT I HAD EVER EXPERIENCED and it was my 7th freaking tattoo.  i wish i’d seen something like this before hand to at least prepare myself.  I had ZERO pain with my foot tattoo.. but this is a great guide!!!! Gearing up for my ankle and this makes me at ease I’ve got some work in the blue zones, and that shit is no joke. Please don’t rush and get your tattoo, PLEASE.
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ais4antjuanette: abovetheignorance: inhale-the-frost: teavibes: christel-thoughts: httpmoonchild: jaded-sage: skindeeptales: 1. Do your research when choosing a tattoo and an artist. Don’t rush yourself when choosing an idea. You’re going to have to live with it forever. Most artists have a speciality, think about this when choosing one. If you want a photorealistic tattoo don’t choose an artist who specializes in American Traditional, for example. Don’t ask to have your neck/face/hands tattooed if it’s your first tattoo, you will most likely be denied. Look into the cost of the tattoo before walking into the shop, don’t sacrifice the tattoo you want to get a good deal. Save up to get the right ink. Be prepared to be placed on a large wait list for the more popular artists. 2. Prepare properly on the day you get your tattoo. Eat a full meal beforehand. Many artists recommend drinking orange juice prior to getting inked. Don’t drink alcohol beforehand. Getting tattooed is a pretty intimate experience, don’t forget to shower. 3. Bring a good reference photo. Bring in a high res photo if possible; at the very least a picture that is big and not blurry. 4. Don’t bring your entourage to the shop with you. It’s fine to bring a friend to hold your hand, any more than one is rude and obnoxious. Children are not permitted in most tattoo shops, leave them at home. 5. Trust your artist.  The artist knows what they are doing, there is no need to be a “backseat driver.” 6. Check out the stencil design, body placement, and spelling before the tattoo begins. via Inked Magazine Inked Magazine If you see something, say something. You aren’t going to hurt anyone’s feelings if you tell them that something is spelled incorrectly. 7. Be prepared to go through some pain, tattoos hurt. Don’t be afraid to tell your artist that you need to take a break if the pain is too much. Nobody wants a passed out client. Ribs, feet, hands, head, and the spine all really hurt. 8. Stay still! We know that it might be difficult to do so, but make every effort to remain as calm and still as possible while getting tattooed. If you are jittery the artist won’t be able to create straight lines. 9. Tip your artist. Most artists don’t own their shops and have to pay a percentage of the tattoo price to the shop. Tipping anywhere between 10-20% should be fine. If you really love the work don’t be afraid of tipping extra. 10. Take care of your tattoo once you leave the shop. Tattoo aftercare is a crucial step in assuring you have a good tattoo. Tattoos will scab and they should heal in 2-3 weeks. Avoid sun and going in bodies of water for the first 2 weeks. Keep the tattoo moist and clean as it heals. Once it’s healed don’t forget to use SPF 50 sunscreen when going outside, you don’t want your tattoo to fade. via Inked Magazine For future reference! THANKKKKK YOUUUUUU that foot tattoo was THE MOST PAINFUL BULLSHIT I HAD EVER EXPERIENCED and it was my 7th freaking tattoo.  i wish i’d seen something like this before hand to at least prepare myself.  I had ZERO pain with my foot tattoo.. but this is a great guide!!!! Gearing up for my ankle and this makes me at ease I’ve got some work in the blue zones, and that shit is no joke. Please don’t rush and get your tattoo, PLEASE. : 10 Rutes of Getting INHEA A Tatroo 00 Calte Wanna see how bad a tattoo will hurt? Pass Out Irritation ais4antjuanette: abovetheignorance: inhale-the-frost: teavibes: christel-thoughts: httpmoonchild: jaded-sage: skindeeptales: 1. Do your research when choosing a tattoo and an artist. Don’t rush yourself when choosing an idea. You’re going to have to live with it forever. Most artists have a speciality, think about this when choosing one. If you want a photorealistic tattoo don’t choose an artist who specializes in American Traditional, for example. Don’t ask to have your neck/face/hands tattooed if it’s your first tattoo, you will most likely be denied. Look into the cost of the tattoo before walking into the shop, don’t sacrifice the tattoo you want to get a good deal. Save up to get the right ink. Be prepared to be placed on a large wait list for the more popular artists. 2. Prepare properly on the day you get your tattoo. Eat a full meal beforehand. Many artists recommend drinking orange juice prior to getting inked. Don’t drink alcohol beforehand. Getting tattooed is a pretty intimate experience, don’t forget to shower. 3. Bring a good reference photo. Bring in a high res photo if possible; at the very least a picture that is big and not blurry. 4. Don’t bring your entourage to the shop with you. It’s fine to bring a friend to hold your hand, any more than one is rude and obnoxious. Children are not permitted in most tattoo shops, leave them at home. 5. Trust your artist.  The artist knows what they are doing, there is no need to be a “backseat driver.” 6. Check out the stencil design, body placement, and spelling before the tattoo begins. via Inked Magazine Inked Magazine If you see something, say something. You aren’t going to hurt anyone’s feelings if you tell them that something is spelled incorrectly. 7. Be prepared to go through some pain, tattoos hurt. Don’t be afraid to tell your artist that you need to take a break if the pain is too much. Nobody wants a passed out client. Ribs, feet, hands, head, and the spine all really hurt. 8. Stay still! We know that it might be difficult to do so, but make every effort to remain as calm and still as possible while getting tattooed. If you are jittery the artist won’t be able to create straight lines. 9. Tip your artist. Most artists don’t own their shops and have to pay a percentage of the tattoo price to the shop. Tipping anywhere between 10-20% should be fine. If you really love the work don’t be afraid of tipping extra. 10. Take care of your tattoo once you leave the shop. Tattoo aftercare is a crucial step in assuring you have a good tattoo. Tattoos will scab and they should heal in 2-3 weeks. Avoid sun and going in bodies of water for the first 2 weeks. Keep the tattoo moist and clean as it heals. Once it’s healed don’t forget to use SPF 50 sunscreen when going outside, you don’t want your tattoo to fade. via Inked Magazine For future reference! THANKKKKK YOUUUUUU that foot tattoo was THE MOST PAINFUL BULLSHIT I HAD EVER EXPERIENCED and it was my 7th freaking tattoo.  i wish i’d seen something like this before hand to at least prepare myself.  I had ZERO pain with my foot tattoo.. but this is a great guide!!!! Gearing up for my ankle and this makes me at ease I’ve got some work in the blue zones, and that shit is no joke. Please don’t rush and get your tattoo, PLEASE.
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