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corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely) : StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health ca...

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thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse : StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

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smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money

smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; the...

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The Elitism of Art: i never realized how much i hate modern art until i took a class in modern art t's so pretentious, like half of the pieces we've looked at have been purportedly commenting on elitism in art and income disparities when the piece itself sold for thousands of dollars to be put in a museum for rich people to look at. you're supposed to look at barren canvases with vague splotches of color and meditate on the nature of life, navelgazing for an hour. bitch I can do that in my own home for free. most of the time the pieces themselves don't require any skill, it's just an asshole with some bright idea thatno one has ever thought of before(which is bullshit, originality is a myth) and the gall to pretend that they re saying something meaningful. A bunch of postmodernists specialize in literal plagiarism but with a different title. wow so edgy. really thought provoking. you sure are making a statement that's care the most egregious example is this bullshit this is an overhead view of a plaza wherein some famous guy was commissioned to design a public art piece for. The brick and nonfunctional fountain was already there. The sculpture? a literal wall of iron bisecting the courtyard. this guy was paid over 100k to design this. Now, this is located in a city, smack dab in the middle of a bunch of office buildings. Workers who had to spend 8 hours a day 5 days a week doing menial desk jobs had to look at this ugly piece of shit. You want to have a nice picnic during lunch break with your work buddies? tough shit. You get tilted arc instead fucko. You can't see from one end of the courtyard to another because some dick thought rebar sheet metal was more important. It also impeded movement between the buildings so that you have to go around this fucking obstacle instead of just fucking walking from one side to the other So yeah, these workers got pissed, because you're making an ugly place even uglier for obscene amounts of money without thinking about the ppl who actually have to look at it every day (who had no say in the design). There have been countless studies done on stress and related health problems in office workers and having to look at ugly as sin shit like this piece of work actually contributes to stress and decreases mental and physical health (as opposed to pretty scenery or When the designer was told what people thought of his masterplece, he threw an absolute shitfit. "art doesn't have to be pretty", he said. "art isn't for the public while it is absolutely true that art doesn't have to be aesthetically pleasing to be meaningful or relevant, putting this fucking monstrosity in a place where people are forced to look at it day in day out, in addition to the ugly buildings and streets and shit that comprises the rest of their lives is just kind of a dick move. Yes, people are painfully aware that life and art and all that shit isn't always pretty, they're the ones who have to live with that fact, not some pompous asshole who thinks he's god's gift to man because he put some metal wall in a And yeah, not all art is for the public. Art can be self- expression or just for your own enjoyment. But if you are being commissioned by the state, paid hundereds of thousands of tax dollars to make a PUBLIC art piece, yeah, it's for the public! saying that other people have no say in what that public art piece looks like, implying that if other people don't like your art that they just Don't Understand True Art TM, is this hugely egotistical self-masturbatory elitism that puts the artist above the working people (when like the whole point of art is supposed to be disrupting this kind of bullshit But that's not even the best part. This fucking douchebag. upon being told that people don't want this metal wall in their courtyard and that they want him to move it, freaks the FUCK out about how he "designed it just for this space and taking it out of its context would destroy it". Which like, yeah context is important when understanding the meaning of a piece. but iterally the only meaning of this piece was "i got paid obscene amounts of money and im gonna use it to make the ugliest thing i can think of literally just because. If you move it out of the context of the plaza it wouldn't be impeding foot traffic or being an eyesore to the workers who are forced to spend thein days there, which is destroying the purpose of the work. So in the end this guy opts to have the piece destroyed rather than moved because he can't stand to have hishigh art removed from its PurposeTM which is to be unpleasant. i dont give a single goddamn fuck about whatever the fuck, if it's causing people stress on top of their already stressful lives just because you thought it would be great to create this atrocity in a place where no one can escape from, you're not advancing anything. you're just So now the space has been converted to a rather plesant little oasis with plants and lots of benches. anyways thats my dissertation on how much i hate contemporary art and find it to lack relevance or meaning to the people it supposedly represents or defends. it takes itself too seriously and imposes arbitrary and hypocritical statements on the nature of art at the expense of any real substance. in the world we live in, pretty things for the sake of being pretty, having stories that are entertaining and engaging and relatable, having fun and feeling good in a world that devalues those things, etc. are far more impactful and radical than anything sitting in a museum created by some millionaire who jacks off to their 'fine art. thanks for coming to my ted talk have a good night #"that just means you're uncultured' i literally give no fucks susan #im not interested in elitism and you can suck a dick 53,922 notes The Elitism of Art
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Friends first Tinder date. She was handed this as soon as they met.: Letter 1 2/9/2018 Subject: Letter 1 Date: Mon, Jan 29, 2018 10:00 am To whom it may concern: My name is Alex. Although I may not be your bartender tonight (I sure do hope been Jason's bartender for the last decade. As a ba You get the opportunity to meet all different kinds someday I'm able to be!), I have of walks of life and learn how to read people very well. Some in and out of your life, while others you choose to keep around. When you come across someone as rtender you get to know some people on a very deep level votten to know Jason really well; everything from his taste in music, work ethic, and his le. Jason's taste in music could be summed up pretty easy (and this goes along with his personality, as they styl should reflect each other), he's got an old soul. He enjoys a classical style of music that helps to promotes thinking, relaxation, and self-growth. He's always been able to keep the bar in a good vibe as he picks the music on the jukebox. He has always kept a job for an extended period of time. He's well versed in bartending (customer service in general), welding, and he is currently an electrician. Jason is known to sport a fedora when it matches well with his jacket. He's always been able to rock those black frame glasses and stand out as a particular handsome fella in a crowd. One area that Jason has continuously impressed me is the way he has treated his past girlfriends and how deep and intimate their relationships were. He has always been a stand up gentleman and communicated with them very well about anything from their relationship to how he feels about something happening in his life. He isn't the kind of guy who's going to pay for everything for you. He enjoys a woman that is self-dependent and knows what she likes and wants out of life. But he is also willing to grow with you as you grow without jealousy regarding it. Jason has always had a confidence and carried himself in that manner. Jason, over the years, has spent his free time volunteering with the developmentally disabled. I feel this is an important point to make because it transitions into so many different aspects of his life. He's patient, trustworthy logical and funny. He has also had a few dogs over the years that were great dogs. His most recent dog (Sylvie) is just the sweetest animal and very fortunate to have Jason as her owner (especially with his tenderheartedness) considering her previous owner (ask Jason, it's his story to tell) I feel that this letter can really be summed up in a few sentences'. Jason is one of the best people I've had the pleasure of calling my friend. He's stands up for what he believes in, makes good choices and treats people well overall. Any woman who chooses to be in his life and he chooses to share his life with are extremely lucky in my opinion Kuddos to you for receiving this letter, as you must be a very spectacular gall Cheers, Alex O https://mail.aol.com/webmail-std/en-us/PrintMessage Friends first Tinder date. She was handed this as soon as they met.

Friends first Tinder date. She was handed this as soon as they met.

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