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ruthion: zottgrammes: there was talk today about the diamond pearls being sad and stuff and i’m here to say#NoSadPearls2016oh i guess the blue diamond refers to yellow as ‘allnatt’, one of the most famous yellow diamonds in the world. the equiv for blue would be ‘hope’, but that seemed like an odd name for diamonds to address each other by.inspired by two comics!@amberfigueroa: http://amberfigueroa.tumblr.com/post/137042331079@sunrayeearts: http://sunrayeearts.tumblr.com/post/136858919577 Oh YIS! This is CUTE!!: ALLNATT & BLUE pt.1 HM? who is it Pear l? bveep! oh. its Yellow Diamond.. | Bhnr! HAlMAtt m so DONE wih Peido KAZZA RZZ ANG D SA ER I S All nate Calm Joun What nspened? Shes cute when she gers worked чр. vSi Uro DoES SHO AN'T TAUK TWME THAT o SHE S J%ouLD ww ARE L EVEN USTENI To ME?! BLU mhm. ALLNATT & BLUE Pt, 2 EAR qUSH KI DESTROY mh m.. And? Oh... STAMP STAMP ZoHg 16 SIAM? N ruthion: zottgrammes: there was talk today about the diamond pearls being sad and stuff and i’m here to say#NoSadPearls2016oh i guess the blue diamond refers to yellow as ‘allnatt’, one of the most famous yellow diamonds in the world. the equiv for blue would be ‘hope’, but that seemed like an odd name for diamonds to address each other by.inspired by two comics!@amberfigueroa: http://amberfigueroa.tumblr.com/post/137042331079@sunrayeearts: http://sunrayeearts.tumblr.com/post/136858919577 Oh YIS! This is CUTE!!

ruthion: zottgrammes: there was talk today about the diamond pearls being sad and stuff and i’m here to say#NoSadPearls2016oh i guess t...

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the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL I found something too awesome not share with you!  I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! Bread fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from. Undersized rolls/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn’t be punished for shorting someone. [wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments] [holds it in] bread police Reblogging this tasty Bread History for 2016! @the-real-ted-cruz loafs were too valuable  i love lore: the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL I found something too awesome not share with you!  I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! Bread fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from. Undersized rolls/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn’t be punished for shorting someone. [wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments] [holds it in] bread police Reblogging this tasty Bread History for 2016! @the-real-ted-cruz loafs were too valuable  i love lore

the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals:...

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<p><a href="https://egalitarian-gamer.tumblr.com/post/176426152109/unaffiliatedpangolin-feminismisahatemovement" class="tumblr_blog">egalitarian-gamer</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="https://unaffiliatedpangolin.tumblr.com/post/175600733132/feminismisahatemovement-yes-even-beer-is-sexist" class="tumblr_blog">unaffiliatedpangolin</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://feminismisahatemovement.tumblr.com/post/175599904628/yes-even-beer-is-sexist-and-racist-now-next" class="tumblr_blog">feminismisahatemovement</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Yes, <i>even </i>beer is sexist and racist now.</p> <h2>“NEXT WEEK:<i> </i>ARE YOUR TOWELS TRANSPHOBIC?”<br/></h2> </blockquote> <p>“How LGBTAAIOPQQ Friendly Is Your Stamp Collection?”</p> <p>“Does Your Lawn Show That You Are A Feminist Ally?”</p> <p>“Does Your Brand Of Canned Soup Challenge The Gender Binary?”<br/></p> </blockquote> <p>“Are your shoes Nazis?”</p> <p>“Is your toilet paper cisgendered and white?”</p> <p>“Is your spaghetti sauce homophobic?”</p> <p>“Do your cleaning supplies break heteronormative gender roles?”</p> </blockquote> <p>“Is your couch gender fluid?”</p><p>“How queer is your refrigerator?”</p><p>“Is your cat litter socially conscious?”</p>: diversity "When you look at craft beer, it's really white and it's really male. Women are starting to get in there, but it's white women, too. When I go into a bar, and I look around, everyone's there...it's like, why aren't you represented in the peo- ple who make the beer?" she explained. "My push with the website] is that it's a conversation. It's not just me showing up yelling at people that you need more people of colour, you need more wom en, you need more queer [people]. Let's just talk about it." beer industry This project, however, wasn't just an overnight decision. As a queer woman of colour, Navarro has always been trying to make space for everyone in the Ontario craft beer industry, with a specific focus on gender identity, race, sexuality, etc. Beer is not a guy's thing anymore There's a tone of female sales reps, there's a tone of female brewers," Na- varro said JULY 2018 II @THECOMMUNITYED HOW DIVERSE IS YOUR BEER? FORMER KW BASED BEER REP EMBARKS ON NEW PROJECT <p><a href="https://egalitarian-gamer.tumblr.com/post/176426152109/unaffiliatedpangolin-feminismisahatemovement" class="tumblr_blog">egalitarian-gamer</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="https://unaffiliatedpangolin.tumblr.com/post/175600733132/feminismisahatemovement-yes-even-beer-is-sexist" class="tumblr_blog">unaffiliatedpangolin</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://feminismisahatemovement.tumblr.com/post/175599904628/yes-even-beer-is-sexist-and-racist-now-next" class="tumblr_blog">feminismisahatemovement</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Yes, <i>even </i>beer is sexist and racist now.</p> <h2>“NEXT WEEK:<i> </i>ARE YOUR TOWELS TRANSPHOBIC?”<br/></h2> </blockquote> <p>“How LGBTAAIOPQQ Friendly Is Your Stamp Collection?”</p> <p>“Does Your Lawn Show That You Are A Feminist Ally?”</p> <p>“Does Your Brand Of Canned Soup Challenge The Gender Binary?”<br/></p> </blockquote> <p>“Are your shoes Nazis?”</p> <p>“Is your toilet paper cisgendered and white?”</p> <p>“Is your spaghetti sauce homophobic?”</p> <p>“Do your cleaning supplies break heteronormative gender roles?”</p> </blockquote> <p>“Is your couch gender fluid?”</p><p>“How queer is your refrigerator?”</p><p>“Is your cat litter socially conscious?”</p>
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Bread Police! Open up!: wine-loving-vagabond A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeil, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud (via Ridiculously Interesting) dduane (sigh) I've seen these before, but this one's particularly beautiful. hungrylikethewolfie I feel like I'm supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that's been preserved for thousands of years, and don't get me wrong, that's hella cool. But honestly, I'm mostly struck by the unexpected news that "bread fraud" was apparently once a serious concem. ironychan Bread Fraud was a huge thing, Bread was provided to the Roman people by the govermment bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and wouid add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. dancingspirals Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to dentify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdie cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. it's a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever traudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn't easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hoie, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stoien dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of ruies and records of people being shifty Check out Fabulous Feasts. Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Peiner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400 Plus the color plates are fantastic hjuliana ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL thisandthathistoryblog l found som ething too awesome not share with you! I'm completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! youmightbeamisogynist fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from Undersized rolis/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn't be punished for shorting someone. donesparce wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments holds it inj bread police Bread Police! Open up!

Bread Police! Open up!

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haiku-robot: areyoutryingtodeduceme: diglettdevious: soylent-queen: gallifrey-feels: drtanner: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. Holy shit.  Bread is serious fucking business. bread is STILL serious fucking business I recently had to deal with a sack of flour that had been half replaced with soap powder. No jokes. Another really good and informative book about bread’s significance and place in history is 6000 Years Of Bread! It’s fairly academic, but a fascinating topic and an engaging read. you guys found out the history of bread FOOD HISTORY IS THE FUCKING BEST SHUT UP DON’T EVEN LOOK AT ME food history is the fucking best shut up don’t even look at me ^Haiku^bot^9. I detect haikus with 5-7-5 format. Sometimes I make mistakes.Help me pay my electicity bills! Being robot is sometimes expensive thing. | PayPal | Patreon : haiku-robot: areyoutryingtodeduceme: diglettdevious: soylent-queen: gallifrey-feels: drtanner: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. Holy shit.  Bread is serious fucking business. bread is STILL serious fucking business I recently had to deal with a sack of flour that had been half replaced with soap powder. No jokes. Another really good and informative book about bread’s significance and place in history is 6000 Years Of Bread! It’s fairly academic, but a fascinating topic and an engaging read. you guys found out the history of bread FOOD HISTORY IS THE FUCKING BEST SHUT UP DON’T EVEN LOOK AT ME food history is the fucking best shut up don’t even look at me ^Haiku^bot^9. I detect haikus with 5-7-5 format. Sometimes I make mistakes.Help me pay my electicity bills! Being robot is sometimes expensive thing. | PayPal | Patreon
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