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bunjywunjy: somnolenttt: bunjywunjy: earthstory: The difference between a good photograph and a National Geographic photograph is often just a slight shift in perspective. Sometimes a ladder is really inexpensive tool (less so in my case, since I had to fly it to the remote Indian Ocean atoll of Aldabra) to obtain a different point of view. This proved to be the case on assignment for @natgeo in Seychelles a few years ago, when the ladder helped me create the opening image for this story. I have posted that particular photograph before, but I will post it again tomorrow for reference. Aldabra has the highest concentration of blacktip reef sharks I have ever experienced. The sheer abundance of sharks there is completely out of this world. At low tide they congregate in a small lagoon on a reef flat where a brisk current bathes them in cooler well oxygenated water. They avoid the deeper water off the reef edge where bigger sharks may prey on them.Time lapse video by my assistant and talented videographer @ottowhitehead thomaspeschak “HEY! HEY HUMAN, HEY! TAKE OUR PICTURE TAKE OUR PICTURE!!!!” Heres the photo he took while on the ladder SO MANY GOOD BOYS : bunjywunjy: somnolenttt: bunjywunjy: earthstory: The difference between a good photograph and a National Geographic photograph is often just a slight shift in perspective. Sometimes a ladder is really inexpensive tool (less so in my case, since I had to fly it to the remote Indian Ocean atoll of Aldabra) to obtain a different point of view. This proved to be the case on assignment for @natgeo in Seychelles a few years ago, when the ladder helped me create the opening image for this story. I have posted that particular photograph before, but I will post it again tomorrow for reference. Aldabra has the highest concentration of blacktip reef sharks I have ever experienced. The sheer abundance of sharks there is completely out of this world. At low tide they congregate in a small lagoon on a reef flat where a brisk current bathes them in cooler well oxygenated water. They avoid the deeper water off the reef edge where bigger sharks may prey on them.Time lapse video by my assistant and talented videographer @ottowhitehead thomaspeschak “HEY! HEY HUMAN, HEY! TAKE OUR PICTURE TAKE OUR PICTURE!!!!” Heres the photo he took while on the ladder SO MANY GOOD BOYS
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lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times : Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times : Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times : Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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justsomeantifas: kirinandvlindertje: justsomeantifas: when will i stop thinking i’m funny tho? source  Okay, a quick and rough calculation I’d say that this person bought about 2000 kcal worth of food, aka about enough for 1 day. For that same $11 I can probably buy a medium bag of rice, a dozen eggs, and some frozen vegetables, allowing me to make over a week worths of food, that is more nutritionally balanced than this. but that doesn’t fit the glamorous aesthetic of a healthy lifestyle. whatever will you do??? : bryan @bryanbinaxas Aug 8 All this abundance for $11, don't ever come at me with "Eating healthy is too expensive" Monique Thebo @grapholect 21h looks like a waste do you know how much ramen i could get for 11 dollars or are you just bad at math and cost per calories. I m a o next bryan @bryanbinaxas 21h Who's eating ramen if they're trying to be healthy? Stop 3 Monique Thebo @grapholect Replying to @bryanbinaxas is the subject "healthy food isnt expensive" or is it "to be healthy" 9:10 PM-9 Aug 2018 1 Retweet 29 Likes justsomeantifas: kirinandvlindertje: justsomeantifas: when will i stop thinking i’m funny tho? source  Okay, a quick and rough calculation I’d say that this person bought about 2000 kcal worth of food, aka about enough for 1 day. For that same $11 I can probably buy a medium bag of rice, a dozen eggs, and some frozen vegetables, allowing me to make over a week worths of food, that is more nutritionally balanced than this. but that doesn’t fit the glamorous aesthetic of a healthy lifestyle. whatever will you do???

justsomeantifas: kirinandvlindertje: justsomeantifas: when will i stop thinking i’m funny tho? source  Okay, a quick and rough calcul...

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<p><a href="https://zengardenamaozn.tumblr.com/post/175492171045/amazing-buddhism-infographic-packed-with" class="tumblr_blog">zengardenamaozn</a>:</p><blockquote><h2><b>Amazing Buddhism infographic packed with mind-blowing facts, little-known history, surprising statistics</b></h2></blockquote> <p>I’ve wondered why so many Buddha statues are fat 🤔 Like is there a specific reason for that?</p>: Essential Buddhism "No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path'" Gautama Buddha What Did Buddha Learn? Life is sufferingSuffering is Suffering can be eliminated caused by desire and attachment How Can Suffering be Eliminated? ..The Eightfold Plan RIGHT VIEW: Know the Truth RIGHT EFFORT: Resist Evil RIGHT INTENTIONs: Free Your Mind of Evil RIGHT ACTION: Good of Others Work for the : : \ RIGHT SPEECH: Say Nothing that Hurts Others RIGHT CONCENTRATION: Practice Meditation RIGHT LIVELIHOOD: Respect Life RIGHT MINDFULNESS Control Your Thoughts What are the Eight Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism? Each symbol represents an aspect of Buddhist teachings: CONCH SHELL (sankha) The Spread of the Buddha's Teachings ENDLESS KNOT (shrivatsa): Infinite Wisdom of the Buddha PARASOL (chatra): Royalty and Protection GOLD FISHES (suvarnamatsya) Good Fortune, Fertility, and Salvation TREASURE VASE (kalasha) Spiritual and Material Abundance VICTORY BANNER (dhvaja) Victory of the Buddha's Wisdom over Ignorance WHEEL (dharmachakra): LOTUS (padma) Mental and Spiritual Purity The Teachings dr〒ソof the Buddha More Interesting Buddhism Facts Anyone can be a buddha, but there is only one "The Buddha" The three tallest statues in the world are of Buddha The Buddha was not chubby; he practiced moderation and was likely slim Unlike many other religions, Buddhism was primarily spread peacefully Buddhist temples are not places of worship but places where people come to study Buddha's teachings and meditate Popular Quotes from the Buddha: You will not be punished for your anger. You will be punished by your anger." What we think, we become." "You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." Three things cannot long be hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." https://www.factretriever.com/buddhism-facts Seek Your Inner Peace CNBUYS Zen Garden <p><a href="https://zengardenamaozn.tumblr.com/post/175492171045/amazing-buddhism-infographic-packed-with" class="tumblr_blog">zengardenamaozn</a>:</p><blockquote><h2><b>Amazing Buddhism infographic packed with mind-blowing facts, little-known history, surprising statistics</b></h2></blockquote> <p>I’ve wondered why so many Buddha statues are fat 🤔 Like is there a specific reason for that?</p>

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