🔥 Popular | Latest

Charlie, Creepy, and Respect: Hari Kondabolu @harikondabolu When someone says "l am not politically correct," what I hear is"I don't really care how these words affect you.' ithelpstodream: everything-casey: ithelpstodream: i can’t believe all the people losing their shit over this post are the same people who make ‘triggered’ jokes. Here’s the thing. If you at all monitor your language based on your audience—avoiding curse words in front of kids, using bigger words in front of your boss—you obviously care about the impression your words give people.  Do you avoid talking about the attractive sex after your bestie’s breakup? Congratulations, friend, you’re being a decent human being. Your friend wishes you call them Charlie instead of Charlotte. It’s just a nickname. Would you say “No, your birth certificate says Charlotte so I’m calling you Charlotte?” Your co-worker tells you that he gets extremely uncomfortable when you clap him on the shoulder, due to a creepy uncle who did the same thing. Do you make a point to clap him on the shoulder every time you see him? It is really not that difficult to be “politically correct.” It does not mean that you must eliminate all opinions completely, it merely means—at a basic level—that you should attempt to be aware of your audience and how your words and actions affect them.  Don’t call it being “PC,” if you must. Call it being “aware and empathetic.” Being a human with decency and respect for other people, cultures, and experiences. ^boom. couldn’t have said it better myself.
Save
Advice, Anaconda, and Bad: somuchforthetolerantleft: straightwhiteboyproblems: one of the reasons why I did straight white boy problems was because I wanted to grow as a person. This blog was my medium and I pushed myself to create, and to create, I had to expand my perspectives.  In some ways, the straight white boy character that you became acquainted with was an exaggerated version of myself. Many of the problems were real life occurrences/observations/events that I drew from personal experience, but some problems also came from friends or were satirized to the point where the anecdote was unrealistic. Straight White Boy Problem #965 is honestly one of my personal favorites because this “problem” was actually a real situation in my life, and this situation could apply for several dudes that are questioning the meaning of masculinity. The person that started at problem #1 is not the same person that finished with problem #1000. I was very much a self-entitled brat when I started this blog, but i have grown since then. I will be graduating college in december with a dual degree, leadership positions in student organizations, and the confidence that I can go out and do anything I set my mind to. having a level of internet popularity (this blog finished with just over 164k followers) on a medium such as tumblr is very scary. one bad move, and you lose your rep - we have seen that with zubat, pizza, and most recently, sixpenceee. my advice to yall is to keep holding people in these positions accountable, but NEVER elevate internet famous people above other people. not everything i said over 3 years was 100% politically correct, but when i was in the wrong, i had fair and jovial conversations with people to figure out why i was in the wrong. no matter where you go in life, try to treat everybody fairly and equally - hopefully they will do the same to you.  as for my name, you can call me alec. i did promise i’d tell you guys who i was after everything was said and done so there ya go. thank you for following this blog and thank you for being a part of this experience. this blog was a giant, beautiful mistake that just kinda happened and im happy that yall enjoyed it as much as i did. i may do something in the future, i may not, but i leave this blog a changed and better person. sincerely, swbp swbp actually being a straight white boy is imo the biggest plot twist of the year Anyways who like dick?
Save
Birthday, Club, and Dad: Handle w ith care SON his mind to imsobadatnicknames: ftm-liamxezra: This is my dad on my 21st birthday. It has taken him 21 years to call me his son. It’s taken 21 years for him to tell me that he’s proud of me. It’s taken him 21 years to tell me that he loves me. It’s taken us 21 years to love each other. When I first came out as transgender my dad didn’t understand and so he reacted with hatred, anger and disappointment. He shamed me for my gender expression and we had to cut off communication. But after my chest surgery in December of 2016 he finally opened his eyes to how happy I finally was. He made the decision to attend rehab and therapy to better himself and focus on his own mental health issues in order to restore our relationship. Since my surgery he’s been nothing but loving and supportive. He always calls me Liam and uses the correct pronouns. He calls me his son and we’re more connected now then ever. In these photos I’m opening a birthday present from my dad. His present was a black ball cap that read “The Jet-Lag Club”. He explained that it was a bar in Japan only for international flight crews. A bar that his father had gone to and he had frequently gone to as well. He got the hat from being such a frequent customer, but it has closed since and now there is no possible was to get one of these hats. He told me it’s his most prized possession. And then he handed it to me and said… “It’s yours now. It’s tradition, from father to son.” Remember that people can grow and change. They can accept and love even after hatred emerged. Remember that people can see who you are. Don’t give up just yet, things can change and they can get better. @xxdarthvaderofmiddle-earthxx

imsobadatnicknames: ftm-liamxezra: This is my dad on my 21st birthday. It has taken him 21 years to call me his son. It’s taken 21 years f...

Save