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Ass, Children, and Grandma: Thread Zachary Fox and 3 others liked A$MR Rocky @ChristianMingel Trained psychologists: "Hitting your kids can cause them to be violent adults" Twitter genius: "l was hit and I never turned out violent. That's why l can't wait to hit my own kids when l get them" 1/4/18, 2:44 PM 19.2K Retweets 55.4K Likes imfemalewarrior: thebaconsandwichofregret: asexual-not-asexual-detective: Am I the only one who thinks that hitting a kid and abuse are different things? Like, if I ever had a kid, I wouldn’t spank their ass raw or something like that. But a bop on the mouth or the ear pull or a smack upside the head? Yea. Those are behavior modifiers. Except they’re not. The studies done by the trained psychologists in this joke show that little kids don’t associate being hit with the thing they’ve done wrong. Very small children only understand consequences that are directly caused by the thing they did. Steal a biscuit, biscuit tastes good. Then for no reason mummy hit me. Very different to stole a biscuit, now no biscuit after dinner because I stole a biscuit. And they also show that when a child is old enough to understand why they are being hit that non-physical punishment is equally as effective and less mentally harmful in the long run. Do you know who benefits the most from hitting as a punishment? The parent. It gives a satisfaction rush. Parents do it because it makes them feel good. Basically kids have two stages: too young to understand why they are being hit so physical punishment is useless for anything other than teaching a child that bigger stronger people can hit you whenever they like (Which sounds like the same lesson you would learn from abuse) And the second stage is old enough to be reasoned with so many punishment options are available and you chose physical violence because it makes *you* feel better, which is an abusive action. The only time a person should ever use violence against another human being, of any age, is to stop that person from being violent themselves. We need to listen to the professionals telling us what is actively harmful to our children and what is actually effective in helping them learn how to grow up and navigate each new stage of their development.  Children are people and you need to Respect them, part of that is learning how to help them and what harms them and not doing the thing that harms them.  -FemaleWarrior, She/They  i think it’s  a societal perversion to acknowledge that hitting your mother, your friend, your grandma if they did something “wrong” is not okay, yet for some strange reason this same correct logic is never used on children the irony is that children are objectively less culpable for their actions than adults yet we use the most violent methods available to “correct” their actions. I find this a disgusting paradox. 
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Being Alone, Children, and Friends: Tweet t1 DickMonger Retweeted Slim Dollars @SlimDollars some people wasnt raised. they was tolerated.. sat in front of a tv and given chicken nuggets and capri suns they whole childhood... we gotta really be mindful of that 4/2/18, 7:59 AM 2,085 Retweets 3,100 Likes smitethepatriarchy: bpdcalvinfischoeder: zakbaganses: jazzisback: sauvamente: Okay but how is this our problem? What’s the context? Thank you, like what does this have to do with me? I’m supposed to be considerate of what here, a lack of socialization? You’re supposed to be aware that some people were raised to be tolerated and that transfers into their adult life. Always being alone as a child doesn’t help you grow into a social adult. It leads you to be friends with people you believe are your friends but are only tolerating you. It leads you to believe that the people who love you and are around you are only tolerating you because you’re around. It feels scary to ask people for anything because you’re afraid they’ll give you what you want only to get you away from them. It makes you feel unlovable, unsocial, and intolerable to the people you love and should know, love you. This is also something that tends to happen to children of resentment; kids who were born to parents who had kids because they were expected to, or any other reason besides wanting kids unconditionally. It’s a very lonely, loveless childhood. It’s a childhood full of you trying to tell your parents about problems and they brush you off, or wanting to talk about something you like and you get “thats nice honey but could you -insert excuse to get you away from them-” You constantly second guess peoples motives. You don’t believe anyone could genuinely want to help you. You see yourself as a bother. You don’t trust people when they do nice things for you because you think theyre just trying to placate you and make you go away. Everyone is only doing nice things for you to be polite, not because theyre a nice person or they care about you. And usually this kind of childhood is accompanied by emotional abuse. Your parents tolerate you, but they would really rather you not be around. And kids aren’t stupid. They know. And it hurts them. It hurt me so much. You grow up believing no one would ever actually love you. Some people really just don’t give a fuck about anyone but themselves to the point that they get offended when you ask them to be aware that many individuals had shitty childhoods.
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Ass, Children, and Crime: Thread Zachary Fox and 3 others liked A$MR Rocky @ChristianMingel Trained psychologists: "Hitting your kids can cause them to be violent adults" Twitter genius: "l was hit and I never turned out violent. That's why l can't wait to hit my own kids when l get them" 1/4/18, 2:44 PM 19.2K Retweets 55.4K Likes holyfuckabear: thebaconsandwichofregret: asexual-not-asexual-detective: Am I the only one who thinks that hitting a kid and abuse are different things? Like, if I ever had a kid, I wouldn’t spank their ass raw or something like that. But a bop on the mouth or the ear pull or a smack upside the head? Yea. Those are behavior modifiers. Except they’re not. The studies done by the trained psychologists in this joke show that little kids don’t associate being hit with the thing they’ve done wrong. Very small children only understand consequences that are directly caused by the thing they did. Steal a biscuit, biscuit tastes good. Then for no reason mummy hit me. Very different to stole a biscuit, now no biscuit after dinner because I stole a biscuit. And they also show that when a child is old enough to understand why they are being hit that non-physical punishment is equally as effective and less mentally harmful in the long run. Do you know who benefits the most from hitting as a punishment? The parent. It gives a satisfaction rush. Parents do it because it makes them feel good. Basically kids have two stages: too young to understand why they are being hit so physical punishment is useless for anything other than teaching a child that bigger stronger people can hit you whenever they like (Which sounds like the same lesson you would learn from abuse) And the second stage is old enough to be reasoned with so many punishment options are available and you chose physical violence because it makes *you* feel better, which is an abusive action. The only time a person should ever use violence against another human being, of any age, is to stop that person from being violent themselves. Hitting a stranger is a crime. Hitting someone small who relies on you for food, love, and shelter should be as well. Don’t hit your fucking kid.
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Alive, Ass, and Beautiful: E a : Garrett Watts @Garrett_Watts Something sad happened today that inspired a thought that l'd love to share with anyone who cares to read this. I mean no shade to any one person with my words but I've seen remarkable, generous people be needlessly lowkey bullied for this & l'd like to shed some light on it. 7:561 < iCloud June 2, 2018 at 7:53 PM Something heartbreaking happened today that inspired a thought which inspired this post. I broke my favorite wand. No, that is not an analogy for anything. I broke my wand and it broke my heart. This may immediately seem like this is about to verge into the territory of being a comical post... which is a natural assumption when a grown man states that he had his heartbroken from "breaking his wand"... but I very much mean what I am about to say because this seemingly silly piece of wood breaking (because my slightly fat ass sat on it) made me realize something that I would like to publicly address. A behavior I have seen flaring up on social media recently, and that is, people passive aggressively judging others for the things that they purchase, cherish & own. Stick with me here cause I have a point... 7:56 1 .uil Cloud For years, I have collected wands of all different kinds, and for years I have been lightheartedly teased by friends and family for such an odd infatuation. Yes, it was my love of the Harry Potter novels that started this collection, but it's turned into something more. I have many wands from different carvers & countries and some of them are so damn beautiful that I legitimately cannot believe I get the honor of owning themm Some of them taking their makers weeks, maybe months to create. tH To me, my wands are beautiful little manifestations of the importance of keeping ones imagination alive through the years. I even keep a few close by to remind me of this. This one was in my car because l sometimes pretend to blast cars into oblivion in LA Traffic. If you ever see me doing this while blasting Missy Elliot through my speakers, I apologize in advance. If you've stuck with me this long, firstly, god bless you. Secondly, I'm about to get to where I'm going with all this 8:051 .ail iCloud Recently on social media I've seen a toxic little trend of people passive aggressively shading others based on the things they choose to purchase with their own money. Some of the wands (or other things I own) didn't come cheap to me, but we as people, buy things consciously & with pride bec they are important to us, and as long as they cause no harm to others, we reserve that right to use our resources as we see fit. ause So whether it be a wand, a pair of Gucci slides, a pair of jeans to boost confidence, a car, a vinyl record... hell, even a taxidermy collection! Whatever! Allow people these things, & furthermore, if you're at all confused or intrigued about said purchase, don't silently judge them for making it or project your own narrative onto it. In fact, try politely asking them about it! If they choose to share with you why they've invested in something in their lives, you might just learn something beautiful & cool about them and make a new friend! Love - Garrett garrettsiwicki:Garrett Watts talking about judging others for their collectibles via his Twitter
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Beer, Confidence, and Driving: 15 Dead Giveaways That Somebody Is American, As Told Bv Non-Americans. Friendly to the point that you become suspicious of their intent 1. Americans generally are more confident in the way they present themselves, most other countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into a room full of different nationalities, I guarantee the American person will be the first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence thing, and I admire it. 2. 3. When they use the imperial system. 4. Wearing sneakers with anything 5. Big smiles, firm handshakes Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!") 6. Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look they have about them (fanny pack, backpack, bottled water, camera pouch) compared to various other tourists Asians tend to herd together for safety, while Europeans vary between blend-right-in Scandinavian to designer-brands-everywhere French and traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But Americans are the only ones who seem to view a perfectly civilized, modern city like some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap bottled water. 7. 8. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I can't even begin to imagine making a sentence where great actually means great. 9. Constant clapping Being surprised about the topless models on page 3. 10. Speaking as a former barman or "bartender" as American customers would say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a barman. I'll occasionally get bought a drink by drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving me money for doing a job that I was already being paid for? Never happened. I would listen for American accents (which were easy to hear due to their natural loudness) and immediately serve them next. 11. Americans describe distances in driving time, as opposed to miles or kilometers. 12. The dead giveaway is when they call you "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling". 13. 14. North face jackets. Everywhere. Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly Very often you can hear them before you see them 15. srsfunny:We Do Love Americans

srsfunny:We Do Love Americans

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