🔥 Popular | Latest

Community, Fire, and Police: Robert Littal Follow aso @BSO Cops Resign After MO Town Elects 1st Black Female Mayor bit.ly/1F41Fdw wia @Tamantha5 7:15 PM - 19 Apr 2015 わ ★ 180 RETWEETS 47 FAVORITES David Waldman @Kagrox Follow Refusing to abide by your oath of office bc the mayor is black tells us everything we need to know about how you regarded the oath before. 8:25 AM-20 Apr 2015 27 RETWEETS 18 FAVORITES bilt2tumble: lisafer: peroxidepirate: antilla-dean: micdotcom: Several Missouri cops have resigned after their town elected a black female mayor  The city of Parma, Missouri, has seen mass resignations among the local police force after the city’s first black female mayor, Tyrus Byrd, was sworn in on Tuesday. Five of the force’s six officers handed in their resignations to the outgoing mayor — but they weren’t the only ones to quit on the new mayor. Beyond microaggressions.   This is what black women have to deal with in any professional situation.  This is the most extreme, but we are constantly having to prove our competence. I feel for this woman. I really do. But those cops who are such racist pieces of shit they refuse to work for a Black woman? Good riddance. Mayor Byrd and the whole community will be better off without them in positions of authority. Wait, it’s bigger than this. This mayor ran on an anti-corruption platform, and there were a total of twenty people who resigned from various parts of the city - city attorney, police, water supervision. It’s suspected that they were all linked to the previous mayor and were part of the corruption she was campaigning against. Citizens have been complaining for years about the corruption with the previous Mayor Randall, and it’s suspected that these resignations were from his cronies. Which makes her the one of the most effective mayors in the U.S. simply by being elected. Going through the records to figure out just how corrupt/racist/abusive they were before she stepped into Office and handing out indictments/canceling pensions is gonna be hard enough. But, at least, now she won’t have to fire their asses.
Save
American, Ford, and Vice: American President Richard Nixon discusses his decision to resign the Presidency with Vice President Gerald Ford (August 2, 1974 - colourized)

American President Richard Nixon discusses his decision to resign the Presidency with Vice President Gerald Ford (August 2, 1974 - colourize...

Save
Church, Desperate, and Family: apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important. heroic
Save
Apple, Facebook, and Football: tibets Reporter wears grape costume to defend boy suspended for banana suit shatterstag: gaymergirls: basedheisenberg: Real recognizes real. I finally got curious and decided to google this story, and the headline is just the tip of the iceberg.  Let it never be said again that journalism is a humorless business. Covering an odd tale about a 14-year-old autistic boy who was handcuffed by police and suspended for running down the sidelines of a high school football game at halftime wearing a banana costume, Washington, D.C. reporter Pat Collins donned a grape suit and went out to get his story. Speaking to Bryan Thompson, who pulled the prank on Sept. 14 and found himself at the center of a controversy over the school’s response, Collins’ sarcastic outrage seemed palpable. “School officials accused him of being disruptive and disrespectful,” Collins said. “Frankly, I don’t see what all the fuss is about.” He asked the student: “Why a banana? Why not a … grape?” “I don’t know,” Thompson replied. “Potassium is great.” Following the prank, Colonial Forge High School Principal Karen Spillman suspended Thompson for 10 days, and even recommended that he be kicked out of school for the entire year. Shortly thereafter, Thompson had composed his own rap song about the incident (called “Free Banana Man!”), set up a Facebook page dedicated to “Banana Man,” and someone even launched a petition calling for his suspension to be lifted. Thompson’s outrage at the punishment was shared by his fellow students, who began creating yellow t-shirts that read, “Free Banana Man!” So the school did what schools so often do when their authority is challenged: they banned the shirts, began confiscating them, and sent students to detention for supporting their classmate. That’s when the American Civil Liberties Union got involved, telling the principal that her actions were unconstitutional. “But when you think about it, you might see [the school’s] point,” Collins jokingly concluded. “It starts with a banana. Then, all of the sudden, you have an apple, and an orange, and maybe a grape! And before you know it, you have fruit salad in the schools! We can’t have that.” The school’s principal was ultimately forced to resign, and Thompson has since returned to his studies. [x] NICE

shatterstag: gaymergirls: basedheisenberg: Real recognizes real. I finally got curious and decided to google this story, and the headlin...

Save