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Children, Destiny, and God: I dig this for a couple of reasons. First, it's got great style. Perhaps more interestingly though, is that it's a very different tone as far as the direction of aggression. Most people know the Clash of the Titans version where she's on the hunt for him once he shows up. But let's face it, Medusa really gets the shaft from destiny overal She starts out as a priestess in a temple who gets raped by Poseidon and gets cursed for it as if it was all her fault. The result is that she's basically doomed to live without human contact for eternity. Then she's hunted down specifically for her head by a demigod whose got all sorts of great toys and backing to get the job done and depicted as some sort of horrible monster for defending her turf from folks out to kill her There are some really interesting theories about regarding just what the whole 'gorgon thing was really about from a historical perspective. It's really quite a tragic tale about the rise of patriarchy and the purge of goddess-centric worshipers. There are also parallels to the Apollo versus Typhon story which is part of the same0 era. Harsh. See, even the demystified stories from ancient times are fascinating! deviantart Medusa by "MattRhodes Reblogging for commentary I wish there were more nuanced portrayals of Medusa than as just a scary. snake lady Not to mention all this shit went down while she was pregnant with twins, the Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor, as a result from the rape Perseus would mount Pegasus, and use him and Medusa's head to kill a sea monster, thus winning him a wife, Andromeda. Medusa was cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and aide her killers and betrayers. And she's supposed to be the monster? ei That's hoW Greek men saw the myth. Greek women viewed it as Athena protecting Medusa by giving her the power to make any man who looked at her completely harmless. Her head was used as a symbol to mark women's shelters in ancient Greece. ใ€‚ Friendly reminder to remember that women have their own vivid lives and cultures and that the stories which are preserved today come through a heavy filter of gender, race, and class biases VIA THEMETAPICTURE.COM srsfunny:I Dig This For A Couple Of Reasons
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Memes, Pool, and Sunrise: AP Photo/J. David Ake The U.S. Capitol and the base of the Washington Monument are mirrored in the reflecting pool on the National Mall at sunrise in Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Capitol and the base of the Washington Monument are mirrored in the reflecting pool on the National Mall at sunrise in Washington, ...

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Be Like, Complex, and Fail: renehta: Rick Sanchez, Don Draper, and BoJack Horseman are three examples of a popular male character trope: the intelligent, talented, toxic, disconnected, detached man who fails to connect with others and is consistently and wildly self destructive in his quest to fill an emotional void with anything but human connection. The problem with this character archetype lies with the fans, insofar as a lot of people, a specific subset of men in particular, miss the entire point of the character. Theyโ€™re so easily sucked in by the flashy veneer of masculine bravado on the surface of these damaged characters that they fail to understand why the characters are presented this way: you do not want to be like them. You are not supposed to identify with them positively or see them as someone to emulate, you are not supposed to sincerely root for them to win most of the time, they are antiheros. In spite of being the protagonist Rick, Don, and BoJack are almost never the โ€œgood guyโ€ in any given scenario, they are almost always selfishly motivated, and explicitly harming innocent people for their own gain. The rare moments of redemption usually donโ€™t last. Idolizing and lionizing these characters as an ideal or something to aspire to entirely misses the concept of the characters, and worse, celebrates behavior that is explicitly shown to be toxic and harmful. If you identify as โ€œa Rickโ€ then the entire concept of the show has gone completely over your head. The creators of all three shows position their characters clearly, and get more blatant with each season. To be clear, seeing negative traits in yourself and identifying with the struggle to improve them, or wanting these characters to change and grow is not what weโ€™re referring to here, but rather the explicit support for and celebration of these characters as they are. This isnโ€™t even a critique of the characters themselves. All of whom are well written, interesting, and complex, but rather itโ€™s a critique of how we see and interpret these characters. This archetype applies to many characters like Sherlock, House, and Archer, and is also mirrored in family members like Beth to Rick or Mycroft to Sherlock. Liking these characters is fine. Enjoying them ia fine, but acknowledge what they are.

renehta: Rick Sanchez, Don Draper, and BoJack Horseman are three examples of a popular male character trope: the intelligent, talented, to...

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Crazy, Fire, and Image: Mirrored forest fire image looks like crazy fire demon thing

Mirrored forest fire image looks like crazy fire demon thing

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