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leatherwoodharris2017: zoekravitzdaily: bluraycharles: Jussie is a symbol of strength. Thinking of him today 🙏🏻 Jussie is such a beautiful and kind person. I truly cannot believe this happened to him Smdh. Sending prayers to he and his family💔 This blog supports and stands with Jussie! Homophobia and Racism have no place in our hearts, our homes, or our society. All Black people esp Gay Black Men and Woman have the right to be safe in our own bodies and communities and not live in fear targeted harassment, taunts, stares or physical violence of any kind at all ever. I truly wish him a speedy recovery love, light, healing and justice. I hope his attackers are punished to the fullest extent of the law. We love you Jussie Smollett!❤ #JussieSmollett #Justiceforjussie This post aged really well: leatherwoodharris2017: zoekravitzdaily: bluraycharles: Jussie is a symbol of strength. Thinking of him today 🙏🏻 Jussie is such a beautiful and kind person. I truly cannot believe this happened to him Smdh. Sending prayers to he and his family💔 This blog supports and stands with Jussie! Homophobia and Racism have no place in our hearts, our homes, or our society. All Black people esp Gay Black Men and Woman have the right to be safe in our own bodies and communities and not live in fear targeted harassment, taunts, stares or physical violence of any kind at all ever. I truly wish him a speedy recovery love, light, healing and justice. I hope his attackers are punished to the fullest extent of the law. We love you Jussie Smollett!❤ #JussieSmollett #Justiceforjussie This post aged really well

leatherwoodharris2017: zoekravitzdaily: bluraycharles: Jussie is a symbol of strength. Thinking of him today 🙏🏻 Jussie is such a beau...

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theamazingsallyhogan: 17mul: mighty-mouth: Colonizers gone colonize. 😂😂 @lmsig In December of 1940, America still hadn’t entered the war. There were a lot of Americans - such as the 800,000 paying members of the America First Committee - who looked at fascists massacring their way through Europe and declared “that’s not our problem.” Captain America was created by two poor Jewish Americans, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, with the specific intent of trying to convince Americans that entering the war was the right thing to do.  It wasn’t easy - Kirby went far beyond what was expected of artists at the time, penciling the entire issue with a deadline that would have been difficult for a two-man crew to pull off.   Captain America punched Hitler right on the cover, at a time when a majority of Americans just didn’t feel like doing anything decisive against the Nazis. Kirby and Simon faced considerable resistance for their creation, including steady hate mail and outright death threats.   Once, while Jack was in the Timely office, a call came from someone in the lobby. When Kirby answered, the caller threatened Jack with bodily harm if he showed his face. Kirby told the caller he would be right down, but by the time Jack reached street level, there was no one to be found. Both creators enlisted after America entered the war.  Kirby, as an artist, was called upon to do the extremely dangerous work of scouting ahead to draw maps.  He also went on to co-create Black Panther in 1966. They didn’t create Captain America to be an accurate depiction of America-As-It-Is.  The character was meant to inspire and embolden, to show America-As-It-Should-Be. The subject of where the Vibranium for the shield came from actually never came up for decades of comics, until it was finally addressed by Black Panther’s writer, Christopher Priest, in 2001.  Priest never shied away from acknowledging America’s racism, but he also understood that Captain America represented an ideal, intended to inspire Americans to be better.  The story mixed together a “present day” discussion between Cap and T’Challa with flashbacks to when Cap met the Black Panther ruling Wakanda during World War II. FLASHBACK: PRESENT: PRESENT - FLASHBACK PRESENT: The Vibranium was given, freely, by one good man to another good man. It is right to rage against the injustices done by our governments.  We must call them out, and we must fight for what’s right. But if you can’t even stand to see the symbols created to inspire people to be better, and rail against those, then you’re just confusing cynicism for realism. : Charlie Griffith Thursday at 9:28 AM So Captain America's shield, perhaps the greatest symbol he has, is made from stolen Wakandan vibrainium. I don't know of many better metaphors in the world. Like Comment Share O You, Ashante Lucombe and 713 others theamazingsallyhogan: 17mul: mighty-mouth: Colonizers gone colonize. 😂😂 @lmsig In December of 1940, America still hadn’t entered the war. There were a lot of Americans - such as the 800,000 paying members of the America First Committee - who looked at fascists massacring their way through Europe and declared “that’s not our problem.” Captain America was created by two poor Jewish Americans, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, with the specific intent of trying to convince Americans that entering the war was the right thing to do.  It wasn’t easy - Kirby went far beyond what was expected of artists at the time, penciling the entire issue with a deadline that would have been difficult for a two-man crew to pull off.   Captain America punched Hitler right on the cover, at a time when a majority of Americans just didn’t feel like doing anything decisive against the Nazis. Kirby and Simon faced considerable resistance for their creation, including steady hate mail and outright death threats.   Once, while Jack was in the Timely office, a call came from someone in the lobby. When Kirby answered, the caller threatened Jack with bodily harm if he showed his face. Kirby told the caller he would be right down, but by the time Jack reached street level, there was no one to be found. Both creators enlisted after America entered the war.  Kirby, as an artist, was called upon to do the extremely dangerous work of scouting ahead to draw maps.  He also went on to co-create Black Panther in 1966. They didn’t create Captain America to be an accurate depiction of America-As-It-Is.  The character was meant to inspire and embolden, to show America-As-It-Should-Be. The subject of where the Vibranium for the shield came from actually never came up for decades of comics, until it was finally addressed by Black Panther’s writer, Christopher Priest, in 2001.  Priest never shied away from acknowledging America’s racism, but he also understood that Captain America represented an ideal, intended to inspire Americans to be better.  The story mixed together a “present day” discussion between Cap and T’Challa with flashbacks to when Cap met the Black Panther ruling Wakanda during World War II. FLASHBACK: PRESENT: PRESENT - FLASHBACK PRESENT: The Vibranium was given, freely, by one good man to another good man. It is right to rage against the injustices done by our governments.  We must call them out, and we must fight for what’s right. But if you can’t even stand to see the symbols created to inspire people to be better, and rail against those, then you’re just confusing cynicism for realism.
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ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and it’s only when she’s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.  The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yu’s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldn’t even have been allowed to try.  This commentary is so curious to me because it’s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men. Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy. And it’s all the more curious because at the end of the day it’s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us. : ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and it’s only when she’s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.  The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yu’s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldn’t even have been allowed to try.  This commentary is so curious to me because it’s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men. Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy. And it’s all the more curious because at the end of the day it’s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us.
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arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts off: “Because the above ornament, which has been a sign of friendship among our forefathers for many centuries has been desecrated recently by another nation of peoples.” [second paragraph] “Therefore it is resolved that henceforth from this date on and forever more our tribes renounce the use of the emblem commonly known today as the swastika or fylfot on our blankets, baskets, art objects, sandpaintings and clothing.” “But I’m using it in it’s ORIGINAL meaning!” Nope. My respect and my heart goes out to the Navajo nation for the willing amputation of a symbol that belonged to them. I had no idea. : C MANY CES HAS BEEN SECTED RECENT By HEREFCRE T. IS RESOLVEN THAT HENCERORTH FROM THIS DATE ON AND FOREVER MORE OR TRIBES RENOUNCE THE USE OF THE EMBLEM СО"MONLY KNOWN TODAy AS THE SVAT AA OR FYLFOT ON OUR BLANKETS, BASKETS, AT ORJECTS, SANDPAINTINGS AND CLOTHING arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts off: “Because the above ornament, which has been a sign of friendship among our forefathers for many centuries has been desecrated recently by another nation of peoples.” [second paragraph] “Therefore it is resolved that henceforth from this date on and forever more our tribes renounce the use of the emblem commonly known today as the swastika or fylfot on our blankets, baskets, art objects, sandpaintings and clothing.” “But I’m using it in it’s ORIGINAL meaning!” Nope. My respect and my heart goes out to the Navajo nation for the willing amputation of a symbol that belonged to them. I had no idea.

arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts...

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