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siryouarebeingmocked: smis-five-creedmoor: kongu2525: someoneintheshadow456: thenightling: pileofknives: honeybubb: me #can’t believe this movie is from 1998 It’s like y'all think people didn’t talk about shit before 2008. It’s because the “Woke” generation likes to pretend they invented inclusiveness and feminism. When I was in Kindergarten (in 1986) the school librarian read us a book about why it’s important to let little boys play with dolls and own dolls if they want them.   Again, this was in 1986 but that somehow blows the minds of this generation.  How did we go so backward that these things from our past surprise them?  I’ve seen kids try to argue how “unrealistic” Stranger Things and Stephen King’s It were because it had white kids friends with a black boy and how “that didn’t happen back then.”    And I’m sitting here like “Where do you think all your interracial friends came from?   Spawned from cabbages?”   Stephen King wrote “It” in 1986 and based it on the dynamic of real friendships he had in the 1950s. When my parents were in 6th grade they had a drawing teacher who was a pedophile. One day he reached under a girls shirt and pinched her breasts and the boys started screaming at him and throwing objects. Their antics alerted the principal, and the boys told him everything and the pedo bastard got fired. THIS WAS IN INDIA IN THE 70s. EVEN BACK THEN 10-12 YEAR OLD BOYS UNDERSTOOD THAT SEXUAL HARASSMENT WAS BAD. People didn’t live in caves and go “unga bunga rape is totes good” and then suddenly change 10 years ago. Because the media keeps acting like we dont already know its bad, they keep pushing the woke agenda when its been normal to call out sexist crap and to not be racist for years now. Lots of whites marched alongside MLK during the Civil Rights movement in the 60s. Because they too saw the bullshit that was Jim Crow Laws. Not being racist is nothing new. I think a lot of activists want to think they’re plucky rebels.I see lots of them who get outright upset when someone goes “the world is less prejudiced than you think”. I’m still reeling from the fact that apparently people don’t think black kids and white kids were friends in the fucking 80s? Like 50s I could at least get the assumption but the 80s???: LET'S NOT DO ANY GENDER STEREOTYPING. siryouarebeingmocked: smis-five-creedmoor: kongu2525: someoneintheshadow456: thenightling: pileofknives: honeybubb: me #can’t believe this movie is from 1998 It’s like y'all think people didn’t talk about shit before 2008. It’s because the “Woke” generation likes to pretend they invented inclusiveness and feminism. When I was in Kindergarten (in 1986) the school librarian read us a book about why it’s important to let little boys play with dolls and own dolls if they want them.   Again, this was in 1986 but that somehow blows the minds of this generation.  How did we go so backward that these things from our past surprise them?  I’ve seen kids try to argue how “unrealistic” Stranger Things and Stephen King’s It were because it had white kids friends with a black boy and how “that didn’t happen back then.”    And I’m sitting here like “Where do you think all your interracial friends came from?   Spawned from cabbages?”   Stephen King wrote “It” in 1986 and based it on the dynamic of real friendships he had in the 1950s. When my parents were in 6th grade they had a drawing teacher who was a pedophile. One day he reached under a girls shirt and pinched her breasts and the boys started screaming at him and throwing objects. Their antics alerted the principal, and the boys told him everything and the pedo bastard got fired. THIS WAS IN INDIA IN THE 70s. EVEN BACK THEN 10-12 YEAR OLD BOYS UNDERSTOOD THAT SEXUAL HARASSMENT WAS BAD. People didn’t live in caves and go “unga bunga rape is totes good” and then suddenly change 10 years ago. Because the media keeps acting like we dont already know its bad, they keep pushing the woke agenda when its been normal to call out sexist crap and to not be racist for years now. Lots of whites marched alongside MLK during the Civil Rights movement in the 60s. Because they too saw the bullshit that was Jim Crow Laws. Not being racist is nothing new. I think a lot of activists want to think they’re plucky rebels.I see lots of them who get outright upset when someone goes “the world is less prejudiced than you think”. I’m still reeling from the fact that apparently people don’t think black kids and white kids were friends in the fucking 80s? Like 50s I could at least get the assumption but the 80s???
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civil rights movement: Black Aziz aNANsi @Freeyourmindkid 1. When the rise of Nazism happened, Nazis were not all 6 foot tall super soldiers who carried quns They were the nice old lady next door, the house mother who plays with her kids, the store clerk who would give you free stuff, etc. Black Aziz aNANsi @Freeyourmindkid 2. During the civil rights movement of the 60's, it wasn't always creepy looking middle age white men who were going around and trying to intimidate and cause violence to black people. There were many everyday men women and children involved, some of who could be your parents. TO SCHOOL " WİTH NEGRO AGKins oChTo SCHOOL WTH NEGROES egroe Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h Replying to @Freeyourmindkid 3. And I'm just going to tell y'all, in the day and age that we are living in, it's not just a few bad apples who are responsible for the violence and hatred that we are seeing from the Trump crowd. It's literally everyone, because Trumps whole ideaology is base on othering ロ391 Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h 4. People and keeping them in a position or powerlessness through control and violence. I'm going to tell y'all right now, some of you may think that you have a friend whose only shitty quality is that they support Trump, but Im going to tell you right now, many Jewish people t1 238 1.1K 4 Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h 5. Had friends who turned them over to the German government because they cared more about othering Jewish folks than their friends. Many black folks who thought that they had a white friend or too would go out to protest back in the day only to see the snarling faces of thei 4 t 246 1K Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h 6. "Friends" in an angry white mob as it descends upon and beats black protesters. And I am guarantee you, that many of your "friends" would not hesitate to have you or somebody that you care about sent back to your county or origin, fired because they assume that you got your 4 ta 243 1K Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h 7. Job through affirmative action or have your reproductive rights taken away because they feel like they feel like what a woman wants to do with her body should be determined by bunch of old white men. I'm telling y'all right now, we are living in the same world that has breeded tl 221 979 Black Aziz aNANsi@Freeyo... 17h 8. Many of an ethnic cleansing and genocide. mean hell, we are already going through ethnic cleansing if you want to count Trump's immigration reforms and mass deportation. But what I'm telling y'all is to stay woke. You can't compromise with these people a nd there is no 243 O 11K Black Aziz aNANsi @Freeyourmindkid 9. Middle ground that can be reached when an ideaologv is base on hegemony and hate. There can be no compromise with evil, the only thing we can do is try to defeat this ideaology & make sure future generations view this ideaology the same way which segregation & Nazism is viewed Buila the BUILD QUM WAL I9 s OK N CE a NAZI.CAN YO SLAM SUCK'S
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Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in the history of the Jim Crow South. Mr. Reed saw him only once — on Aug. 28, 1955, during the last hours of Till’s life — in the back of a green and white Chevrolet pickup truck. Mr. Reed, a sharecropper, risked his life at 18 to appear as a surprise witness in the prosecution of the white men accused of the crime. He became the momentary hero of the Till trial, an event that helped spur the civil rights movement. Mr. Reed passed away in 2013 at a hospital in Oak Lawn, Illinois. He was 76, and he had lived in Chicago under a different name — first in secrecy and later in relative obscurity — since fleeing Mississippi for his safety over 65 years ago. For decades, he had worked as a hospital orderly. Mr. Reed knew speaking out against the defendants in the case would make him, too, a target for lynching. But he “couldn’t have walked away,” he said years later. “Emmett was 14,” Mr. Reed told the CBS News show “60 Minutes,” “and they killed him. I mean, that’s not right. . . . I knew that I couldn’t say no. Via: washingtonpost.com WillieReed EmmettTill theblaquelioness: At age 18, Willie Reed risked his life to appear as a surprise witness in the Emmett Till Murder Trial theblaquelioness @theblaquelioness Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in the history of the Jim Crow South. Mr. Reed saw him only once — on Aug. 28, 1955, during the last hours of Till’s life — in the back of a green and white Chevrolet pickup truck. Mr. Reed, a sharecropper, risked his life at 18 to appear as a surprise witness in the prosecution of the white men accused of the crime. He became the momentary hero of the Till trial, an event that helped spur the civil rights movement. Mr. Reed passed away in 2013 at a hospital in Oak Lawn, Illinois. He was 76, and he had lived in Chicago under a different name — first in secrecy and later in relative obscurity — since fleeing Mississippi for his safety over 65 years ago. For decades, he had worked as a hospital orderly. Mr. Reed knew speaking out against the defendants in the case would make him, too, a target for lynching. But he “couldn’t have walked away,” he said years later. “Emmett was 14,” Mr. Reed told the CBS News show “60 Minutes,” “and they killed him. I mean, that’s not right. . . . I knew that I couldn’t say no. Via: washingtonpost.com WillieReed EmmettTill theblaquelioness

Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in th...

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thegayalchemist: tommymitchell920: juptiers: maejemison: i read the “do kids really need love, simon” article and it sure is. bad imagine implying that gay kids don’t face internalized homophobia and struggle with coming out even if they have support systems and thinking that’s a hot take. wack Like….what? Imagine writing that article and thinking it was, like….good Who the fuck.? It seems that the author needs to be reminded that high schoolers don’t already have a degree in gender studies i guess racism ended with the civil rights movement and sexism ended when woman got the right to vote and homophobia ended when gay marriage was legal federally pack your bags there’s nothing left to solve! : But that's precisely the problem. Kids like Simon, in 2018, already have a good shot of fitting in. They don't need this movie. Will they look up from Netflix to notice that it has premiered? Love, Simon feels like a film responding to an entirely different culture, like one in which gay marriage was never legalized. That decision both acknowledged that equality for gays had won the day and opened the door for far more interesting and challenging fights, ones the next generation will lead. Movies that integrate those stories are ones worth anticipating with relish. Love, Simon, by contrast, simply feels like looking back in time thegayalchemist: tommymitchell920: juptiers: maejemison: i read the “do kids really need love, simon” article and it sure is. bad imagine implying that gay kids don’t face internalized homophobia and struggle with coming out even if they have support systems and thinking that’s a hot take. wack Like….what? Imagine writing that article and thinking it was, like….good Who the fuck.? It seems that the author needs to be reminded that high schoolers don’t already have a degree in gender studies i guess racism ended with the civil rights movement and sexism ended when woman got the right to vote and homophobia ended when gay marriage was legal federally pack your bags there’s nothing left to solve! 
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Happy Birthday to the one and only AngelaDavis! 🎉✊🏾🙌🏾 . Angela Davis is an American political activist, academic, and author. She emerged as a prominent counterculture activist in the 1960s as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human rights. She was a professor (now retired) at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in its History of Consciousness Department and a former director of the university's Feminist Studies department. Her research interests are feminism, African-American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons. She co-founded Critical Resistance, an organization working to abolish the prison–industrial complex.: "I am no longer accepting the things I can not change. I am changing the things I can not accept 93 DR. ANGELA DAVIS Happy Birthday to the one and only AngelaDavis! 🎉✊🏾🙌🏾 . Angela Davis is an American political activist, academic, and author. She emerged as a prominent counterculture activist in the 1960s as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human rights. She was a professor (now retired) at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in its History of Consciousness Department and a former director of the university's Feminist Studies department. Her research interests are feminism, African-American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons. She co-founded Critical Resistance, an organization working to abolish the prison–industrial complex.

Happy Birthday to the one and only AngelaDavis! 🎉✊🏾🙌🏾 . Angela Davis is an American political activist, academic, and author. She emerged...

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Be PROUD little one and rise up! We got your back! 🇭🇹✊🏿✊🏽✊🏾✊🏼 Repost @activistnyc: “On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Haitian and African American communities gathered in Times Square for a direct action in response to Donald Trump's recent comments about Haitian and African immigrants. During a meeting with lawmakers, Trump described Haiti and certain African countries as "shithole countries" and questioned why so many immigrants from these countries are coming to the United States. Although Trump denies being a racist, he has become the role model for white supremacists in America. The fight against racism and oppression that Martin Luther King Jr. started during the civil rights movement is far from over. Today, we remember his legacy and continue his fight for justice and equality.” shitholecountries shitholepresident martinlutherking martinlutherkingjr MLK MLKday immigrants immigrantsmakeamericagreat immigrantswelcome immigrantsarewelcomehere immigrantrights immigration immigrantnation haiti haitian haitianamerican african africanamerican racism injustice oppression fucktrump dumptrump trumpsucks impeachtrump resist resisttrump activistny documentaryphotography photojournalism: PROUD HATIAN AMERICAN Be PROUD little one and rise up! We got your back! 🇭🇹✊🏿✊🏽✊🏾✊🏼 Repost @activistnyc: “On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Haitian and African American communities gathered in Times Square for a direct action in response to Donald Trump's recent comments about Haitian and African immigrants. During a meeting with lawmakers, Trump described Haiti and certain African countries as "shithole countries" and questioned why so many immigrants from these countries are coming to the United States. Although Trump denies being a racist, he has become the role model for white supremacists in America. The fight against racism and oppression that Martin Luther King Jr. started during the civil rights movement is far from over. Today, we remember his legacy and continue his fight for justice and equality.” shitholecountries shitholepresident martinlutherking martinlutherkingjr MLK MLKday immigrants immigrantsmakeamericagreat immigrantswelcome immigrantsarewelcomehere immigrantrights immigration immigrantnation haiti haitian haitianamerican african africanamerican racism injustice oppression fucktrump dumptrump trumpsucks impeachtrump resist resisttrump activistny documentaryphotography photojournalism
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9 Things You May Not Know About Martin Luther King Jr. - Blogged By @Climb_This_Hill ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Every year on January 15th marks a special remembrance for Martin Luther King Jr. as we celebrate his birthday and achievements as a civil rights leader and activist in black history. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As we remember his heroic efforts today, there are still a few things you may not have known about MLK. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 1. Martin Luther King Jr. was born Micheal King, and both he and his father changed their name after the German Protestant leader, Martin Luther. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 2. Martin Luther King Jr. began taking college classes full-time at Atlanta’s Morehouse College at the age of 15 and graduated with his Ph.D. at 25. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 3. On October 14th, 1964, at age 35, Martin Luther King Jr. became the youngest man to receive a Nobel Peace Prize for resisting racial inequality through non-violence. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 4. King donated all of the $54,123 (worth about $400,000 today) of his Nobel Peace Prize award to the Civil Rights movement. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 5. He was the first African American to be granted a national federal holiday. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 6. Over 1,000 streets in the U.S are named after Martin Luther King Jr. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 7. MLK was arrested more than 20 times for his non-violent civil rights protests. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 8. King won a Grammy for ‘Best Spoken Word Album’ for “Why I Oppose the War in Vietnam.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 9. In 2006, the Martin Luther King Jr. National Monument in Washington, D.C. was marked the first monument on the National Mall dedicated to an African-American. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Happy Birthday, MLK. We appreciate all that you’ve done for the black culture and the sacrifices you’ve made to help create equality inside and out of our oppressed community.: 9 Things You May Not Know About Martin Luther King Jr. @balleralert 9 Things You May Not Know About Martin Luther King Jr. - Blogged By @Climb_This_Hill ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Every year on January 15th marks a special remembrance for Martin Luther King Jr. as we celebrate his birthday and achievements as a civil rights leader and activist in black history. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As we remember his heroic efforts today, there are still a few things you may not have known about MLK. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 1. Martin Luther King Jr. was born Micheal King, and both he and his father changed their name after the German Protestant leader, Martin Luther. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 2. Martin Luther King Jr. began taking college classes full-time at Atlanta’s Morehouse College at the age of 15 and graduated with his Ph.D. at 25. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 3. On October 14th, 1964, at age 35, Martin Luther King Jr. became the youngest man to receive a Nobel Peace Prize for resisting racial inequality through non-violence. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 4. King donated all of the $54,123 (worth about $400,000 today) of his Nobel Peace Prize award to the Civil Rights movement. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 5. He was the first African American to be granted a national federal holiday. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 6. Over 1,000 streets in the U.S are named after Martin Luther King Jr. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 7. MLK was arrested more than 20 times for his non-violent civil rights protests. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 8. King won a Grammy for ‘Best Spoken Word Album’ for “Why I Oppose the War in Vietnam.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 9. In 2006, the Martin Luther King Jr. National Monument in Washington, D.C. was marked the first monument on the National Mall dedicated to an African-American. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Happy Birthday, MLK. We appreciate all that you’ve done for the black culture and the sacrifices you’ve made to help create equality inside and out of our oppressed community.

9 Things You May Not Know About Martin Luther King Jr. - Blogged By @Climb_This_Hill ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Every year on January 15th marks a s...

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President DonaldTrump has asked Cuba to return American fugitive AssataShakur to the United States, but a top Cuban official has said that the country's government has no plans to. "I can say it is off the table," Gustavo Machin, deputy director for American affairs at the Cuban Ministry of Foreign Affairs, reportedly told Yahoo News. Assata Shakur was a member of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and 1970s, and was convicted in 1977 of murdering a police officer. Many believe Shakur was targeted and framed by COINTELPRO, an FBI-sanctioned program that was used to neutralize people and organizations involved in the Civil Rights Movement (among others). Shakur served six and a half years in prison before escaping in 1979 and fleeing to Cuba, where she received political asylum from Fidel Castro. She has lived in Cuba ever since, and remains on the FBI's most wanted fugitives list, with a $2 million bounty. Artists like The Roots, Jay Z, and Common, who has a song titled "A Song For Assata," have all mentioned or paid homage to her legacy in their music. Last week, President Donald Trump revealed plans to cancel policy from the Obama Adminstration that eased longstanding tensions between America and Cuba. He then called for Cuba to "return the fugitives from American justice, including the return of the cop killer Joanne Chesimard," referring to Shakur by her former name. Machin said Cuba has no plans to return her to the U.S., because its government believes that she was unjustly imprisoned in the first place. “There are very serious doubts about that case," Machin said. "We consider that a politically motivated case against that lady." Via @revolttv revolttv realrozay rozayblog: REVOLT Rippedemup.com Cuba will keep Assata Shakur, despite Trump's request to return her to U.S A top Cuban official says returning the prison escapee is "off the table.' President DonaldTrump has asked Cuba to return American fugitive AssataShakur to the United States, but a top Cuban official has said that the country's government has no plans to. "I can say it is off the table," Gustavo Machin, deputy director for American affairs at the Cuban Ministry of Foreign Affairs, reportedly told Yahoo News. Assata Shakur was a member of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and 1970s, and was convicted in 1977 of murdering a police officer. Many believe Shakur was targeted and framed by COINTELPRO, an FBI-sanctioned program that was used to neutralize people and organizations involved in the Civil Rights Movement (among others). Shakur served six and a half years in prison before escaping in 1979 and fleeing to Cuba, where she received political asylum from Fidel Castro. She has lived in Cuba ever since, and remains on the FBI's most wanted fugitives list, with a $2 million bounty. Artists like The Roots, Jay Z, and Common, who has a song titled "A Song For Assata," have all mentioned or paid homage to her legacy in their music. Last week, President Donald Trump revealed plans to cancel policy from the Obama Adminstration that eased longstanding tensions between America and Cuba. He then called for Cuba to "return the fugitives from American justice, including the return of the cop killer Joanne Chesimard," referring to Shakur by her former name. Machin said Cuba has no plans to return her to the U.S., because its government believes that she was unjustly imprisoned in the first place. “There are very serious doubts about that case," Machin said. "We consider that a politically motivated case against that lady." Via @revolttv revolttv realrozay rozayblog

President DonaldTrump has asked Cuba to return American fugitive AssataShakur to the United States, but a top Cuban official has said tha...

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18 JUNE: James Baldwin's 1963 classic book 'The Fire Next Time' addressed the racism facing Black people in America. Photographer Steve Schapiro read one of James Baldwin's essays and he pitched an idea to Life Magazine; to follow James Baldwin across the US on his speaking tour for one month. Both Life Magazine and James Baldwin agreed, and his photographs documented that journey of the Civil Rights movement. They showed people who would become inspirations, like Martin Luther King Jr, who fought against segregation and the struggle to get the vote for African Americans. Now the publisher Taschen has reprinted the book, complete with never seen before pictures to mark this time. Photos: Steve Schapiro-TASCHEN More: bbc.in-blackinterest racism civilrights civilrightsmovement martinlutherking jamesbaldwin thefirenexttime america usa steveschapiro photography bbcshorts bbcnews @bbcnews: THE CIVIL RIGHTS JOURNEY 18 JUNE: James Baldwin's 1963 classic book 'The Fire Next Time' addressed the racism facing Black people in America. Photographer Steve Schapiro read one of James Baldwin's essays and he pitched an idea to Life Magazine; to follow James Baldwin across the US on his speaking tour for one month. Both Life Magazine and James Baldwin agreed, and his photographs documented that journey of the Civil Rights movement. They showed people who would become inspirations, like Martin Luther King Jr, who fought against segregation and the struggle to get the vote for African Americans. Now the publisher Taschen has reprinted the book, complete with never seen before pictures to mark this time. Photos: Steve Schapiro-TASCHEN More: bbc.in-blackinterest racism civilrights civilrightsmovement martinlutherking jamesbaldwin thefirenexttime america usa steveschapiro photography bbcshorts bbcnews @bbcnews
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<p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/158118559340/march-7th-1965-bloody-sunday-in-selma-on-this" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2><b>March 7th 1965: Bloody Sunday in Selma</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1965, a civil rights march took place from Selma to Birmingham, Alabama; it became known as ‘Bloody Sunday’. At this stage, the Civil Rights Movement had been in motion for over a decade and already achieved legislative success with the Civil Rights Act. However the focus of the movement now became making the promise of equal franchise guaranteed in the Fifteenth Amendment a reality. While African-Americans exercised the right to vote in the years after the amendment’s passage in 1870, discriminatory measures like literacy tests, poll taxes, and grandfather clauses were soon implemented across the country to deprive them of the vote. Thus in 1965 civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. made voter registration the core of their efforts, centering the campaign on the particularly discriminatory Selma, AL. On March 7th - ‘Bloody Sunday’ - as the six hundred unarmed marchers were crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were descended upon by state troopers who viciously beat the protestors. The violence encountered by these peaceful marchers, which was captured on television and broadcast around the world, led to national outcry and caused President Johnson to publicly call for the passage of his administration’s proposed voting rights bill. After securing the support of federal troops, another march was held on March 21st, and with the protection of soldiers the marchers managed to arrive in Montgomery after three days. The marchers were met in Montgomery - the epicentre of the movement and the site of the 1954 bus boycott - by 50,000 supporters, who were <a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fmlk-kpp01.stanford.edu%2Findex.php%2Fencyclopedia%2Fdocumentsentry%2Fdoc_address_at_the_conclusion_of_selma_march%2F&amp;t=ODFiYTlmNTUzMDBkNDZlNDZmNWY3ZmRlMzUxZmFlM2IwZTFhYjJjMCxmektqZnFpQQ%3D%3D&amp;b=t%3AK8nQSpQKtfYKCWU81c9qzQ&amp;p=http%3A%2F%2Ftodayinhistory.tumblr.com%2Fpost%2F112966559746%2Fmarch-7th-1965-bloody-sunday-in-selma-on-this&amp;m=1">addressed by King</a>. Their efforts were rewarded when, in August of that year, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act that ensured all Americans could vote. This was one of the crowning achievements of the Civil Rights Movement, and the Selma to Montgomery march is commemorated as one of the most important moments of the struggle.</small></p><blockquote><p><b><i><small>“We are on the move and no wave of racism can stop us. The burning of our churches will not deter us. The bombing of our homes will not dissuade us. We are on the move now…not even the marching of mighty armies can halt us. We are moving to the land of freedom”</small></i></b><br/><small>- King’s &lsquo;Address at the Conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery March’ - 25th March, 1965</small></p></blockquote></blockquote>: 15 GE <p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/158118559340/march-7th-1965-bloody-sunday-in-selma-on-this" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2><b>March 7th 1965: Bloody Sunday in Selma</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1965, a civil rights march took place from Selma to Birmingham, Alabama; it became known as ‘Bloody Sunday’. At this stage, the Civil Rights Movement had been in motion for over a decade and already achieved legislative success with the Civil Rights Act. However the focus of the movement now became making the promise of equal franchise guaranteed in the Fifteenth Amendment a reality. While African-Americans exercised the right to vote in the years after the amendment’s passage in 1870, discriminatory measures like literacy tests, poll taxes, and grandfather clauses were soon implemented across the country to deprive them of the vote. Thus in 1965 civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. made voter registration the core of their efforts, centering the campaign on the particularly discriminatory Selma, AL. On March 7th - ‘Bloody Sunday’ - as the six hundred unarmed marchers were crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were descended upon by state troopers who viciously beat the protestors. The violence encountered by these peaceful marchers, which was captured on television and broadcast around the world, led to national outcry and caused President Johnson to publicly call for the passage of his administration’s proposed voting rights bill. After securing the support of federal troops, another march was held on March 21st, and with the protection of soldiers the marchers managed to arrive in Montgomery after three days. The marchers were met in Montgomery - the epicentre of the movement and the site of the 1954 bus boycott - by 50,000 supporters, who were <a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fmlk-kpp01.stanford.edu%2Findex.php%2Fencyclopedia%2Fdocumentsentry%2Fdoc_address_at_the_conclusion_of_selma_march%2F&amp;t=ODFiYTlmNTUzMDBkNDZlNDZmNWY3ZmRlMzUxZmFlM2IwZTFhYjJjMCxmektqZnFpQQ%3D%3D&amp;b=t%3AK8nQSpQKtfYKCWU81c9qzQ&amp;p=http%3A%2F%2Ftodayinhistory.tumblr.com%2Fpost%2F112966559746%2Fmarch-7th-1965-bloody-sunday-in-selma-on-this&amp;m=1">addressed by King</a>. Their efforts were rewarded when, in August of that year, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act that ensured all Americans could vote. This was one of the crowning achievements of the Civil Rights Movement, and the Selma to Montgomery march is commemorated as one of the most important moments of the struggle.</small></p><blockquote><p><b><i><small>“We are on the move and no wave of racism can stop us. The burning of our churches will not deter us. The bombing of our homes will not dissuade us. We are on the move now…not even the marching of mighty armies can halt us. We are moving to the land of freedom”</small></i></b><br/><small>- King’s &lsquo;Address at the Conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery March’ - 25th March, 1965</small></p></blockquote></blockquote>

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💯✊ Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael) was a Trinidadian-American who became a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement and the global Pan-African movement. He grew up in the United States from the age of 11 and became an activist while he attended Howard University. He would eventually become active in the Black Power movement, first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and finally as a leader of the All-African People's Revolutionary Party (A-APRP). stokleycarmichael, kwameture blacklivesmatter, blackkings blackqueens BlackGirlMagic blackisbeautiful, blackandproud, blackandbeautiful melaninpower melanin proudtobeblack unapologeticallyblack blackhistory blackexcellence blackpride blackpower blackhistory365, blackhistorymonth: #BHM He went from being a student of nonviolence to the Creator of "Black Power Stokely Carmichael encouraged us to be BLACK and FEARLESS POLICE DEPT JACKBON, M188 2097 💯✊ Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael) was a Trinidadian-American who became a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement and the global Pan-African movement. He grew up in the United States from the age of 11 and became an activist while he attended Howard University. He would eventually become active in the Black Power movement, first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and finally as a leader of the All-African People's Revolutionary Party (A-APRP). stokleycarmichael, kwameture blacklivesmatter, blackkings blackqueens BlackGirlMagic blackisbeautiful, blackandproud, blackandbeautiful melaninpower melanin proudtobeblack unapologeticallyblack blackhistory blackexcellence blackpride blackpower blackhistory365, blackhistorymonth

💯✊ Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael) was a Trinidadian-American who became a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement and the glo...

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Watch this important full video: tailopez.com-mentors - Here's a list of famous people and their mentors: MENTEE-MENTORS - DESCRIPTION 1. Steve Jobs-Robert Friedland - Founded Apple... 2. Albert Einstein-Max Talmey - Developed the Theory of Relativity... 3. Stephen Hawkings-Dennis W. Sciama - Developed Theories of Black Holes and Quantum Physics... 4. Mark Zuckerberg-Steve Jobs - Created Facebook... 5. Bill Gates-Ed Roberts - Created Microsoft... 6. Bruce Lee-IP Man - Martial Artist... 7. Warren Buffett-Benjamin Graham - Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway worth over $500 billion... 8. Jeff Bezos-Bill Campbell - Created Amazon... 9. Conor McGregor-John Kavanagh - MMA Fighter... 10. Andrew Carnegie-Thomas Scott - Industrialist, Expanded Steel Industry... 11. Robin-Batman - Fought Evil Super Villains 12. Michael Jordan-Phil Jackson-Dean Smith - 6 Time NBA Champion, 5 Time NBA MVP... 13. Oprah Winfrey-Mary Duncan-Maya Angelou - Highest Rated Talk Show... 14. Sam Walton-L. S. Robson - Created Walmart.... 15. Jay Z-Lyor Cohen - Started Roc NationSteve n 16. Martin Luther King Jr.-Benjamin Mays - Led Civil Rights Movement... 17. Will Smith-Muhammad Ali - Actor and Producer... 18. Barrack Obama-Frank Marshall Davis - Former President Of The United States... 19. Tom Hanks-Rawley Farnsworth - Actor and Filmmaker... 20. Denzel Washington-Sidney Poitier - Academy Award Winning Actor.... 21. Larry Page-Steve Jobs - Co-founder of Google... 22. Bill Hewlett and David Packard-Frederick Terman - Started Hewlett-Packard... 23. Marc Benioff-Larry Ellison - Founder and Chairman of Salesforce... 24. Michael Dell-Lee Walker - Chairman and CEO of Dell... 25. Jack Dorsey-Ray Chambers - Founded Twitter 26. Kobe Bryant-Michael Jordan - 5 Time NBA Champion, 4 Time NBA MVP... 27. Nikola Tesla-Sir William Crookes - Famous Engineer and Inventor, Invented the “Tesla coil”.. People lie, but the numbers don't. Look at the numbers above is a list of facts you can check yourself if you don't believe that.: DOYOUNEED MENTORS? (OR BOOKS)... the youngest billionaire at the started WATCH THE FULL VIDEO: TAILOPEZ.COMMENTORS Watch this important full video: tailopez.com-mentors - Here's a list of famous people and their mentors: MENTEE-MENTORS - DESCRIPTION 1. Steve Jobs-Robert Friedland - Founded Apple... 2. Albert Einstein-Max Talmey - Developed the Theory of Relativity... 3. Stephen Hawkings-Dennis W. Sciama - Developed Theories of Black Holes and Quantum Physics... 4. Mark Zuckerberg-Steve Jobs - Created Facebook... 5. Bill Gates-Ed Roberts - Created Microsoft... 6. Bruce Lee-IP Man - Martial Artist... 7. Warren Buffett-Benjamin Graham - Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway worth over $500 billion... 8. Jeff Bezos-Bill Campbell - Created Amazon... 9. Conor McGregor-John Kavanagh - MMA Fighter... 10. Andrew Carnegie-Thomas Scott - Industrialist, Expanded Steel Industry... 11. Robin-Batman - Fought Evil Super Villains 12. Michael Jordan-Phil Jackson-Dean Smith - 6 Time NBA Champion, 5 Time NBA MVP... 13. Oprah Winfrey-Mary Duncan-Maya Angelou - Highest Rated Talk Show... 14. Sam Walton-L. S. Robson - Created Walmart.... 15. Jay Z-Lyor Cohen - Started Roc NationSteve n 16. Martin Luther King Jr.-Benjamin Mays - Led Civil Rights Movement... 17. Will Smith-Muhammad Ali - Actor and Producer... 18. Barrack Obama-Frank Marshall Davis - Former President Of The United States... 19. Tom Hanks-Rawley Farnsworth - Actor and Filmmaker... 20. Denzel Washington-Sidney Poitier - Academy Award Winning Actor.... 21. Larry Page-Steve Jobs - Co-founder of Google... 22. Bill Hewlett and David Packard-Frederick Terman - Started Hewlett-Packard... 23. Marc Benioff-Larry Ellison - Founder and Chairman of Salesforce... 24. Michael Dell-Lee Walker - Chairman and CEO of Dell... 25. Jack Dorsey-Ray Chambers - Founded Twitter 26. Kobe Bryant-Michael Jordan - 5 Time NBA Champion, 4 Time NBA MVP... 27. Nikola Tesla-Sir William Crookes - Famous Engineer and Inventor, Invented the “Tesla coil”.. People lie, but the numbers don't. Look at the numbers above is a list of facts you can check yourself if you don't believe that.
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Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in the history of the Jim Crow South. Mr. Reed saw him only once — on Aug. 28, 1955, during the last hours of Till’s life — in the back of a green and white Chevrolet pickup truck. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed, a sharecropper, risked his life at 18 to appear as a surprise witness in the prosecution of the white men accused of the crime. He became the momentary hero of the Till trial, an event that helped spur the civil rights movement. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed died July 18 at a hospital in Oak Lawn, Ill. He was 76, and he had lived in Chicago under a different name — first in secrecy and later in relative obscurity — since fleeing Mississippi for his safety over 60 years ago. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed knew speaking out against the defendants in the case would make him, too, a target for lynching. But he “couldn’t have walked away,” he said years later. “Emmett was 14,” Mr. Reed told the CBS News show “60 Minutes,” “and they killed him. I mean, that’s not right. . . . I knew that I couldn’t say no. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ May we be him. May we know him. May we raise him. WillieReed EmmettTill theblaquelioness: May the spirit of Willie Reed, who risked his life heblaquellonesS to testify in the Emmett Till murder trial, guide us all in 2017 Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in the history of the Jim Crow South. Mr. Reed saw him only once — on Aug. 28, 1955, during the last hours of Till’s life — in the back of a green and white Chevrolet pickup truck. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed, a sharecropper, risked his life at 18 to appear as a surprise witness in the prosecution of the white men accused of the crime. He became the momentary hero of the Till trial, an event that helped spur the civil rights movement. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed died July 18 at a hospital in Oak Lawn, Ill. He was 76, and he had lived in Chicago under a different name — first in secrecy and later in relative obscurity — since fleeing Mississippi for his safety over 60 years ago. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Mr. Reed knew speaking out against the defendants in the case would make him, too, a target for lynching. But he “couldn’t have walked away,” he said years later. “Emmett was 14,” Mr. Reed told the CBS News show “60 Minutes,” “and they killed him. I mean, that’s not right. . . . I knew that I couldn’t say no. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ May we be him. May we know him. May we raise him. WillieReed EmmettTill theblaquelioness

Willie Reed did not know Emmett Till, the young man whose murder in the Mississippi Delta became one of the most infamous lynchings in th...

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👀🐸☕️ The LIAR who said EmmettTill made physical advances at her admits that she lied. Carolyn Bryant Donham, claimed the young African-American boy made physical advances at her in 1955 confessed that she fabricated it. Her claims led to her husband and his brother killing Till. Till's death propelled the civil rights movement. StayWoke America FakeNews RealNews @melaninvibez400 17thsoulja BlackIG17th Former Barack Obama signed legislation that allows the FBI and the Department of Justice to reopen unsolved civil rights cases. Initially titled Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes, the updated version of this bill now allows both agencies to bring to justice those who committed crimes prior to 1970. Named after Emmett Till, the 14-year-old boy from Chicago who was taken from his bed in the middle of night, beat and shot by two white men for allegedly whistling at a white woman, the Justice Department is being encouraged to reach out to “activists, advocates and academics working on these issues.” Other departments who will aid in resolving these cases include the Cold Case Justice Initiative at Syracuse University, Northeastern University School of Law’s Civil Rights and and Restorative Justice Project, The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University. Introduced in 2005 by activist Alvin Sykes, Sykes vowed to Till’s mother Mamie Elizabeth Till-Mobley that he would reopen the case. Originally her son’s killers were acquitted by an all white jury for their crimes. The case was reopened in 2004 and closed three years later when a jury decided not to indict Carolyn Bryant, the woman who accused Emmett Till for whistling at her. Several politicians believe the new bill will allow more cases to be solved. Those politicians include Sen. Claire McCaskill, Rep. John Lewis and Jim Sensenbrenner.: Emmett Till was MURDERED cause a white woman said he whistled at her. She admits today that he really didn't. Why isn't she in jail? I'm lost GIF 👀🐸☕️ The LIAR who said EmmettTill made physical advances at her admits that she lied. Carolyn Bryant Donham, claimed the young African-American boy made physical advances at her in 1955 confessed that she fabricated it. Her claims led to her husband and his brother killing Till. Till's death propelled the civil rights movement. StayWoke America FakeNews RealNews @melaninvibez400 17thsoulja BlackIG17th Former Barack Obama signed legislation that allows the FBI and the Department of Justice to reopen unsolved civil rights cases. Initially titled Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes, the updated version of this bill now allows both agencies to bring to justice those who committed crimes prior to 1970. Named after Emmett Till, the 14-year-old boy from Chicago who was taken from his bed in the middle of night, beat and shot by two white men for allegedly whistling at a white woman, the Justice Department is being encouraged to reach out to “activists, advocates and academics working on these issues.” Other departments who will aid in resolving these cases include the Cold Case Justice Initiative at Syracuse University, Northeastern University School of Law’s Civil Rights and and Restorative Justice Project, The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University. Introduced in 2005 by activist Alvin Sykes, Sykes vowed to Till’s mother Mamie Elizabeth Till-Mobley that he would reopen the case. Originally her son’s killers were acquitted by an all white jury for their crimes. The case was reopened in 2004 and closed three years later when a jury decided not to indict Carolyn Bryant, the woman who accused Emmett Till for whistling at her. Several politicians believe the new bill will allow more cases to be solved. Those politicians include Sen. Claire McCaskill, Rep. John Lewis and Jim Sensenbrenner.

👀🐸☕️ The LIAR who said EmmettTill made physical advances at her admits that she lied. Carolyn Bryant Donham, claimed the young African-Am...

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Decades Later, Emmett Till’s Accuser Admits She Lied- blogged by: @msjennyb- ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On August 21, 1955, 14-year-old EmmettTill arrived in Money, Mississippi to visit his uncle, Mose Wright. Three days later, Till went to a store owned by a white couple to buy bubble gum. As he left the establishment, he reportedly whistled at the 21-year-old owner, CarolynBryant. At the time, Bryant claimed Till grabbed her hand and tried to come on to her, asking for a date, which was later revealed in her testimony. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Four days after the encounter, Bryant’s husband and his half-brother, John William “J.W.” Milam, kidnapped Till, beat and shot him to death, leaving his body terribly disfigured. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The two men were arrested and charged, however with the help of an all-white, all-male jury, they were acquitted. Decades later, the woman behind the murder that helped drive the American civil rights movement, admitted to exaggerating the story that led to the mutilation of Till’s body. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him,” Carolyn Bryant Donham is quoted saying in “The Blood of Emmett Till” by Timothy Tyson. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ For years after the trial, Bryant went into hiding. She divorced, remarried, divorced and remarried again, without ever giving an interview on what really happened on August 24th at the store in Mississippi. However, in 2007, things changed when the then-72-year-old agreed to speak with Tyson. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In her conversation with Tyson, she confessed to fabricating the main part of her testimony. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “That part’s not true,” Bryant said, referring to her claim that Till tried to come on to her with verbal and physical advances. In regards to what else really happened at the store in 1955, she said she couldn’t remember, but she did say she .....to read the rest log on to BallerAlert.com (clickable link on profile) logon readmore: Decades Later, Emmett Till's Accuser Admits She Lied @balleralert Read more: www.balleralert.com Decades Later, Emmett Till’s Accuser Admits She Lied- blogged by: @msjennyb- ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On August 21, 1955, 14-year-old EmmettTill arrived in Money, Mississippi to visit his uncle, Mose Wright. Three days later, Till went to a store owned by a white couple to buy bubble gum. As he left the establishment, he reportedly whistled at the 21-year-old owner, CarolynBryant. At the time, Bryant claimed Till grabbed her hand and tried to come on to her, asking for a date, which was later revealed in her testimony. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Four days after the encounter, Bryant’s husband and his half-brother, John William “J.W.” Milam, kidnapped Till, beat and shot him to death, leaving his body terribly disfigured. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The two men were arrested and charged, however with the help of an all-white, all-male jury, they were acquitted. Decades later, the woman behind the murder that helped drive the American civil rights movement, admitted to exaggerating the story that led to the mutilation of Till’s body. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him,” Carolyn Bryant Donham is quoted saying in “The Blood of Emmett Till” by Timothy Tyson. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ For years after the trial, Bryant went into hiding. She divorced, remarried, divorced and remarried again, without ever giving an interview on what really happened on August 24th at the store in Mississippi. However, in 2007, things changed when the then-72-year-old agreed to speak with Tyson. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In her conversation with Tyson, she confessed to fabricating the main part of her testimony. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “That part’s not true,” Bryant said, referring to her claim that Till tried to come on to her with verbal and physical advances. In regards to what else really happened at the store in 1955, she said she couldn’t remember, but she did say she .....to read the rest log on to BallerAlert.com (clickable link on profile) logon readmore

Decades Later, Emmett Till’s Accuser Admits She Lied- blogged by: @msjennyb- ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On August 21, 1955, 14-year-old EmmettTi...

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