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80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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Bad, Drugs, and Food: The LAD Bible 2 hrs LADOIbi When you break out of prison and find out about McDonald's monopoly... 20th Century Fox Television WH Photography ldr Like Comment →Share Top Comments 12,516 shares Wentworth Miller Today I found myself the subject of an Internet meme. Not for the first time. This one, however, stands out from the rest. In 2010, semi-retired from acting, I was keeping a low-profile for a number of reasons. First and foremost, I was suicidal This is a subject I've since written about, spoken about, shared about. But at the time l suffered in silence. As so many do. The extent of my struggle known to very, very few. Ashamed and in pain, I considered myself damaged goods. And the voices in my head urged me down the path to self-destruction. Not for the first time. I've struggled with depression since childhood. It's a battle that's cost me time, opportunities, relationships, and a thousand sleepless nights In 2010, at the lowest point in my adult life, I was looking everywhere for relief/comfort/distraction. And I turned to food. It could have been anything Drugs. Alcohol. Sex. But eating became the one thing I could look forward to. Count on to get me through. There were stretches when the highlight of my week was a favorite meal and a nevw episode of TOP CHEF. Sometimes that was enough. Had to be. And I put on weight. Big f--king deal. One day, out for a hike in Los Angeles witha friend, we crossed paths with a film crew shooting a reality show. Unbeknownst to me, paparazzi were circling. They took my picture, and the photos were published alongside images of me from another time in my career. "Hunk To Chunk." "Fit To Flab." Etc. My mother has one of those "friends" who's always the first to bring you bad news. They clipped one of these articles from a popular national magazine and mailed it to her. She called me, concerned. In 2010, fighting for my mental health, it was the last thing I needed. Long story short, I survived. So do those pictures. I'm glad. Now, when I see that image of me in my red t shirt, a rare smile on my face, I am reminded of my struggle. My endurance and my perseverance in the face of all kinds of demons. Some within. Some without. Like a dandelion up through the pavement, I persist. Anyway. Still. Despite. The first time I saw this meme pop up in my social media feed, I have to admit, it hurt to breathe. But as with everything in life, I get to assign meaning. And the meaning I assign to this/my image is Strength. Healing. Forgiveness. Of myself and others. If you or someone you know is struggling, help is available. Reach out. Text. Send an email. Pick up the phone. Someone cares. They're waiting to hear from you. Much love . -W.M. drethelin: legally-bitchtastic: funniest-stuff: Great lesson in empathy, you never know what someone is going through. “And I put on weight. Big f–ing deal” is gonna be my new mantra Wentworth Miller is really good
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Anaconda, Apple, and Batman: Christian Bale weight loss and weight gain On the left is Christian Bale in the 2004 film The Machinist- the film he did before being cast as Batman in Batman Begins. Check out (The Machinist) if you get a chance. It's one of Bale's best performances. He took up smoking to help curb his appetite when he was crash-dieting for The Machinist. He wanted to drop down to 100 pounds, but the director said no out of fear that his health could be in too much jeopardy. Bale drank one cup of black unsweetened coffee, and ate one can of tuna or one apple each day- for 4 months prior to filming. On the DVD featurette, he said he found that his weakened condition caused problems such as having trouble running because he litterally had no leg muscles left. He then started eating both the apple & tuna on days he would be shooting a phyhical scene. His 63-pound weight loss is one of the most drastic for any actor-actress in film history. Director (Brad Anderson) had planned on using some CGI to thin Bale out and was shocked & impressed when he saw Bale's appearance on the first day of shooting knowing he wouldn't need CGI. After Bale was cast as Bruce Wayne-Batman, he was told to get as big as possible. Bale underwent a 6 month dietary and exercise regimen and ended up weighing about 220 pounds- 40 pounds above his normal weight, and 100 pounds from what he weighed in The Machinist. It was decided that Bale had become too large. Friends of his and some of the film crew dubbed him "Fatman". He quickly shed about 20 pounds to have a leaner, more muscular frame. Bale described the experience as an unbearable physical ordeal ☆ BatmanBegins ChristianBale ChristopherNolan ChrisNolan Nolanverse TheBatman BruceWayne GothamCity TheMachinist BradAnderson TrevorReznik TheDarkKnight DarkKnight TheDarkKnightRises DarkKnightRises TDK TDKR DcMovies DcFilms DcMovie DcFilm DcComics DcMultiverse DcComicsFan CapedCrusader TheCapedCrusader DcFans DcComicsUniverse DcComicsUnited DcUniverse

On the left is Christian Bale in the 2004 film The Machinist- the film he did before being cast as Batman in Batman Begins. Check out (The M...

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80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
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Bad, Comfortable, and Drugs: The LAD Bible 2 hrs. When you break out of prison and find out about McDonald's monopoly... C 20th Century Fox Television WH Photography Like Comment A Share 101K Top Comments 12,516 shares Wentworth Miller Today I found myself the subject of an Internet meme. Not for the first time. This one, however, stands out from the rest. In 2010, semi-retired from acting, I was keeping a low-profile for a number of reasons. First and foremost, I was suicidal This is a subject l've since written about, spoken about, shared about. But at the time l suffered in silence. As so many do. The extent of my struggle known to very, very few. Ashamed and in pain l considered myself damaged goods. And the voices in my head urged me down the path to self-destruction. Not for the first time. I've struggled with depression since childhood. It's a battle that's cost me time, opportunities, relationships, and a thousand sleepless nights. In 2010, at the lowest point in my adult life, l was looking everywhere for relief/comfort/distraction And I turned to food. It could have been anything Drugs. Alcohol. Sex. But eating became the one thing I could look forward to. Count on to get me through. There were stretches When the highlight of my week was a favorite meal and a new enough. Had to be And I put on weight. Big f--king deal One day, out for a hike in Los Angeles with a friend, we crossed paths with a film crew shooting a reality show. Unbeknownst to me, paparazzi were circling. They took my picture, and the photos were published alongside images of me from another time in my career. "Hunk To Chunk." "Fit To Flab." Etc My mother has one of those "friends" who's always the first to bring you bad news. They clipped one of these articles from a popular national magazine and mailed it to her. She called me, concerned In 2010, fighting for my mental health, it was the last thing needed Long story short, I survived So do those pictures. I'm glad. Now, when I see that image of me in my red t- shirt, a rare smile on my face, l am reminded of my struggle. My endurance and my perseverance in the face of all kinds of demons. Some within. Some without Like a dandelion up through the pavement, l persist. Anyway. Still. Despite. The first time I saw this meme pop up in my social media feed, I have to admit, it hurt to breathe. But as with everything in life, I get to assign meaning And the meaning l assign to this/my image is Strength. Healing. Forgiveness. Of myself and others. If you or someone you know is struggling, help is available. Reach out. Text. Send an email. Pick up the phone. Someone cares. They're waiting to hear from you. Much love. W.M. #koalas thinneractivist Prison broken

Prison broken

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Apparently, Club, and Drinking: DOCUMENT: Drunk, Internet NOVEMBER 12, 2014 "Drunk Girl" Video Is Latest Viral Hoax Purported "social experiment" was staged by its Los Angeles creators Comments (28) Drunk Girl In Public (Social Experiment) LI NOVEMBER 12-The viral video claiming to show a series of men plotting to take advantage of a drunk Los Angeles woman was staged by the clip's creators, who fed lines to the purported predators, dupes who thought they were appearing in a student film, The Smoking Gun has learned. SUBMIT A TIP! The video, Drunk Girl In Public," is described as a "social experiment by creator Stephen Zhang, 20, who apparently sought to ride the coattails of the 35 million- view Hollaback! video showing a woman being peppered with catcalls as she walked across New York City. Boulevard, has been viewed nearly 4.5 million times since it was uploaded to YouTube on November 8. The clip stars actress Jennifer Box, 24, who teeters on high heels while drinking from a paper bag. The clip portrays the tipsy Box as prey being stalked by the men she encounters When one of the men seen in the clip complained bitterly about his portray al as a wannabe rapist, one of the video's creators sent a private Facebook message advising him to, "Just go with it dude, you are in our team now and we will take care of you. <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://underattack86.tumblr.com/post/102538158928/the-pietriarchy-wyoh-literalscumblr-oh">underattack86</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://the-pietriarchy.tumblr.com/post/102530852612/wyoh-literalscumblr-oh-look-it-was-a">the-pietriarchy</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://wyoh.tumblr.com/post/102527352349/literalscumblr-oh-look-it-was-a-fucking-hoax">wyoh</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://literalscumblr.tumblr.com/post/102520006702/oh-look-it-was-a-fucking-hoax-source">literalscumblr</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><strong>Oh look, it was a fucking hoax.</strong> [<a href="http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/drunk-girl-viral-hoax-video-785463">source</a>]</p> </blockquote> <blockquote> <p>According to two sources familiar with the clip’s production, the men in the video were approached on the street to take part in a “comedic, hidden camera” video. One source, who said he declined an invitation to be in the video, told TSG that he was told the production was a “student video.” He added that the film crew did not ask for participants to sign releases or any other “paperwork.”</p> <p>Josh Blaine, the shaggy-haired man wearing sunglasses in the video, drives a Hollywood tour bus. In a message to his Facebook friends, Blaine said that he did “a favor for some camera crew guess this is what I get for being agreeable to someones project.” He added that, “it was supposed to be a funny skit. here’s to watching my back with virtually no friends. fuck my life.”</p> </blockquote> <p>They’ve basically been portrayed as would-be rapists for the world to see and they weren’t asked any release and were not paid?!</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="http://www.laweekly.com/informer/2014/11/12/drunk-girl-video-was-a-big-fat-set-up">From another article.</a> <a href="http://laist.com/2014/11/12/that_viral_video_of_a_drunk_girl_as.php">And another.</a></p> <blockquote> <p><span>Christine Michaels, owner of </span>LA Epic Club Crawls<span>, says employee Mike “Mokii” Koshak told her he was approached by the video’s maker and told to act the part of a zealous suitor for what he believed was a student comedy short film.</span><span>(…) Koshak later said he felt duped by the producer when he saw the final product.</span></p> </blockquote> <blockquote> <p><span>Koshak said on his Facebook page today that “the video that has me in it that’s going around the web was all staged and all of the people in it were acting.”</span></p> <p><span>We were told that Koshak, who had not apparently signed a release, is now seeking legal representation in the matter.</span></p> </blockquote> <p><span>Falsely making innocent men look like rapists so that someone can get a viral video out there is incredibly horrible behavior. I hope that tumblr spreads that this was all a set-up and that these men are actually victims here instead of giving more attention to the original video that is still going around. They now have their faces tied to horrible behavior that they did not commit and one of them already lost a contracting job over it. <em>This is not okay.</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>Yo it’s just another page in the tumblr feminist’s big book of Shit That Never Happened.</p> </blockquote> <p>NB4 tumblrfems come rolling up with #yesallwomen bullcrap.</p>
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