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lebanon-hangover: partlysmith: gelunnucifera: callan-the-misandrist: positive-press-daily: This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x] NEAT YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious. The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground. Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light. At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above). And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.) solar punk sensibilities with cyber punk aesthetic Swamplamp : lebanon-hangover: partlysmith: gelunnucifera: callan-the-misandrist: positive-press-daily: This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x] NEAT YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious. The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground. Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light. At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above). And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.) solar punk sensibilities with cyber punk aesthetic Swamplamp

lebanon-hangover: partlysmith: gelunnucifera: callan-the-misandrist: positive-press-daily: This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than...

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shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: fluidwithwings: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: When I say that I live in Chicago, this is not what most people imagine. Same spot. Different day. Winter is coming. Again. Today is a nice day. Looks like winter is going to be waiting. October weather feels like October. The wind was blowing at my face pretty good. These Autumn Leaves, drift by my window. These Autumn Leaves, of red and gold….. I really expected that I would have missed all the leaf dropping. It’s quite beautiful out today. Even at the solstice, the tree still holds onto its leaves. Happy new year tree! The lake is starting to freeze here. It was a fun walk today! The lake was putting on quite a show today. The wind was blowing in from the Northeast. I ran in to a nice person taking photos as well, and had a small chat. I think that this is the earliest that I have been out. I need to remember to do this more often. I’m up eairly again! Turns out that there were no waves today, dispite the wind blowing in in about 15 miles an hour. The lake was frozen! It’s February thaw time! It’s hard to tell in the images but it’s actually raining pretty hard at this point. When I got home I had about 30 lb of water that is soaked into all my clothing. Went for a night time walk. It was supper windy out, but still warm enough to keep things from freezing again. Spring might be closer than I thought. This is a really nice set Today, as I approached the water, I thought that it looked rather brown for such a calm day. When I took a look down the pier I saw that it is just that the water is very clear now. The brown is the sand at the bottomThis is the time of year when shipwrecks are clearly visible from the air, it is before the algae has had a chance to grow this year. All the branches had little red-brown buds on them, it should be bright green the next time I come and see it. It was super windy today, and with the sun directly behind me it made it hard to see my screen. The buds are a bit larger now, but much less growth than I was expecting: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: fluidwithwings: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: shibariphoenix: When I say that I live in Chicago, this is not what most people imagine. Same spot. Different day. Winter is coming. Again. Today is a nice day. Looks like winter is going to be waiting. October weather feels like October. The wind was blowing at my face pretty good. These Autumn Leaves, drift by my window. These Autumn Leaves, of red and gold….. I really expected that I would have missed all the leaf dropping. It’s quite beautiful out today. Even at the solstice, the tree still holds onto its leaves. Happy new year tree! The lake is starting to freeze here. It was a fun walk today! The lake was putting on quite a show today. The wind was blowing in from the Northeast. I ran in to a nice person taking photos as well, and had a small chat. I think that this is the earliest that I have been out. I need to remember to do this more often. I’m up eairly again! Turns out that there were no waves today, dispite the wind blowing in in about 15 miles an hour. The lake was frozen! It’s February thaw time! It’s hard to tell in the images but it’s actually raining pretty hard at this point. When I got home I had about 30 lb of water that is soaked into all my clothing. Went for a night time walk. It was supper windy out, but still warm enough to keep things from freezing again. Spring might be closer than I thought. This is a really nice set Today, as I approached the water, I thought that it looked rather brown for such a calm day. When I took a look down the pier I saw that it is just that the water is very clear now. The brown is the sand at the bottomThis is the time of year when shipwrecks are clearly visible from the air, it is before the algae has had a chance to grow this year. All the branches had little red-brown buds on them, it should be bright green the next time I come and see it. It was super windy today, and with the sun directly behind me it made it hard to see my screen. The buds are a bit larger now, but much less growth than I was expecting

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toast-potent: postmakerextreme: biochemandstuff: sciencesourceimages: Video Clip SS218421 (Tardigrade Walking Through Algae) Tardigrade (Hypsibius dujardini) walking through algae, microscope view. Tardigrades are commonly known as water bears or moss piglets. They are found in practically every habitat on Earth, from hot springs to beneath ice sheets, and are renowned for their toughness.  See More Tardigrade Videos Experiments have shown they can survive being frozen to nearly absolute zero and heated to 150 degrees Celsius. They have survived pressures of more than 6000 atmospheres, and have survived after prolonged exposure to the vacuum and radiation found in space.  In unfavorable conditions they can dehydrate to 1% of their normal water content and remain alive in stasis for over a decade. In more normal conditions, they prefer moist environments where they feed on algae and bacteria.  This tardigrade is often used as a model organism in biological research, and its genome is being sequenced. © Sinclair Stammers / Science Source @thesleepiestpsleepscientist BABYBOY he is SO fucking valid : toast-potent: postmakerextreme: biochemandstuff: sciencesourceimages: Video Clip SS218421 (Tardigrade Walking Through Algae) Tardigrade (Hypsibius dujardini) walking through algae, microscope view. Tardigrades are commonly known as water bears or moss piglets. They are found in practically every habitat on Earth, from hot springs to beneath ice sheets, and are renowned for their toughness.  See More Tardigrade Videos Experiments have shown they can survive being frozen to nearly absolute zero and heated to 150 degrees Celsius. They have survived pressures of more than 6000 atmospheres, and have survived after prolonged exposure to the vacuum and radiation found in space.  In unfavorable conditions they can dehydrate to 1% of their normal water content and remain alive in stasis for over a decade. In more normal conditions, they prefer moist environments where they feed on algae and bacteria.  This tardigrade is often used as a model organism in biological research, and its genome is being sequenced. © Sinclair Stammers / Science Source @thesleepiestpsleepscientist BABYBOY he is SO fucking valid
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toast-potent: postmakerextreme: biochemandstuff: sciencesourceimages: Video Clip SS218421 (Tardigrade Walking Through Algae) Tardigrade (Hypsibius dujardini) walking through algae, microscope view. Tardigrades are commonly known as water bears or moss piglets. They are found in practically every habitat on Earth, from hot springs to beneath ice sheets, and are renowned for their toughness.  See More Tardigrade Videos Experiments have shown they can survive being frozen to nearly absolute zero and heated to 150 degrees Celsius. They have survived pressures of more than 6000 atmospheres, and have survived after prolonged exposure to the vacuum and radiation found in space.  In unfavorable conditions they can dehydrate to 1% of their normal water content and remain alive in stasis for over a decade. In more normal conditions, they prefer moist environments where they feed on algae and bacteria.  This tardigrade is often used as a model organism in biological research, and its genome is being sequenced. © Sinclair Stammers / Science Source @thesleepiestpsleepscientist BABYBOY he is SO fucking valid : toast-potent: postmakerextreme: biochemandstuff: sciencesourceimages: Video Clip SS218421 (Tardigrade Walking Through Algae) Tardigrade (Hypsibius dujardini) walking through algae, microscope view. Tardigrades are commonly known as water bears or moss piglets. They are found in practically every habitat on Earth, from hot springs to beneath ice sheets, and are renowned for their toughness.  See More Tardigrade Videos Experiments have shown they can survive being frozen to nearly absolute zero and heated to 150 degrees Celsius. They have survived pressures of more than 6000 atmospheres, and have survived after prolonged exposure to the vacuum and radiation found in space.  In unfavorable conditions they can dehydrate to 1% of their normal water content and remain alive in stasis for over a decade. In more normal conditions, they prefer moist environments where they feed on algae and bacteria.  This tardigrade is often used as a model organism in biological research, and its genome is being sequenced. © Sinclair Stammers / Science Source @thesleepiestpsleepscientist BABYBOY he is SO fucking valid
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comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them! BUCKET LIST. WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS. : comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them! BUCKET LIST. WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS.

comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to stin...

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comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them! BUCKET LIST. WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS. : comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them! BUCKET LIST. WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS.

comedownstairsandsayhello: frecklesandink: momamiaaa: Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to stin...

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kaijutegu: hotbabespaghetti: This is probably the cutest This is the perfect pet for people who want to keep a small container of water with something pretty in it. Even though it’s a plant and not a fish, it’s way cuter than a sad, cramped betta- and less maintenance, too. A marimo is perfect for that pretty aesthetic or your college dorm room. Want a mason jar aquarium? A marimo will be perfectly happy in there. Want a fishbowl with pretty rocks? Get a marimo, or even a few of them! I can’t overstate how wonderful and cute marimo are. : About this item Hi. I'm your new Marimo (Japanese) Cladophora Ball, or Moss Ball (English). I am a rare algae growth that only forms in a few lakes in Iceland, Scotland, Japan and Estonia. Many cultures consider me good luck. l'm very easy to care for. Just place me in a container with tap water and change it every one or two weeks. Please rinse anything you add to my container to keep my home clean. You don't need to feed me. I don't require anything but low light and clean water to live. Please don't put me in direct sunlight. We don't get much of that on the lake floor, so I don't like it. I am most comfortable in normal to low household lighting. The gentle lake currents give me my beautiful round shape. If you gently swirl my water every once in a while that would be great. As a special treat you could even take me out and gently roll me across your palm. I sink or float depending on my mood (oxygen produced by the photosynthesis moves me up and down.) If turn brown you can help me by replacing my water, squeezing me under running water to wash out any dirt, and adding about 5% table salt to my water. I will recover quickly. Also, a night in the fridge is like a week at the spa for me as I prefer cold water. I can live up to 200 years and grow about.5cm per year. Thanks for being so kind to me. Now I'm going to get to work being awesome. kaijutegu: hotbabespaghetti: This is probably the cutest This is the perfect pet for people who want to keep a small container of water with something pretty in it. Even though it’s a plant and not a fish, it’s way cuter than a sad, cramped betta- and less maintenance, too. A marimo is perfect for that pretty aesthetic or your college dorm room. Want a mason jar aquarium? A marimo will be perfectly happy in there. Want a fishbowl with pretty rocks? Get a marimo, or even a few of them! I can’t overstate how wonderful and cute marimo are.

kaijutegu: hotbabespaghetti: This is probably the cutest This is the perfect pet for people who want to keep a small container of water...

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Researchers discovered that algae and salamanders have a tendency to share cells. Scientists aren't sure why they've evolved this way, but it could be a sign of a new symbiotic relationship. Apparently, cell-within-cell arrangements are common between different species, including coral, clams and different kinds of insects, but the relationship between algae and salamanders seems odd mainly because it seems to not be mutually beneficial. Research shows that the salamander doesn't appear to have any problem sharing a cell — scientists think it may actually be benefiting from it in some way — while the algae, on the other hand, finds its roommate stressful and is forced to rely on alternative methods of energy production. Kind of like when your roommate uses most of the internet bandwidth.. (Image via Roger Hangarter): Researchers discover rare inter-species relationship between salamanders and algae Researchers discovered that algae and salamanders have a tendency to share cells. Scientists aren't sure why they've evolved this way, but it could be a sign of a new symbiotic relationship. Apparently, cell-within-cell arrangements are common between different species, including coral, clams and different kinds of insects, but the relationship between algae and salamanders seems odd mainly because it seems to not be mutually beneficial. Research shows that the salamander doesn't appear to have any problem sharing a cell — scientists think it may actually be benefiting from it in some way — while the algae, on the other hand, finds its roommate stressful and is forced to rely on alternative methods of energy production. Kind of like when your roommate uses most of the internet bandwidth.. (Image via Roger Hangarter)

Researchers discovered that algae and salamanders have a tendency to share cells. Scientists aren't sure why they've evolved this way, bu...

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