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Children, Field Trip, and Target: O Xaran So wild-west-wind: ftcreature: Children, this is dirt.   dirt?dirt?  dirt?dirt? dirt?dirt? dirt?  dirt?    dirt? dirt?    dirt?  A geology field trip

wild-west-wind: ftcreature: Children, this is dirt.   dirt?dirt?  dirt?dirt? dirt?dirt? dirt?  dirt?    dirt? dirt?    dirt?  A geology ...

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Children, Field Trip, and Tumblr: O Xaran So wild-west-wind: ftcreature: Children, this is dirt.   dirt?dirt?  dirt?dirt? dirt?dirt? dirt?  dirt?    dirt? dirt?    dirt?  A geology field trip

wild-west-wind: ftcreature: Children, this is dirt.   dirt?dirt?  dirt?dirt? dirt?dirt? dirt?  dirt?    dirt? dirt?    dirt?  A geology ...

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Bad, Work, and Best: snowysauropteryx Can you lick the science? An abbreviated list. Genetics: Do not. Unless cheek swabs? Archaeology: Perhaps. But might be human bone. Geology: Sometimes needed, sometimes dangerous Psychology: Best not. Physics: ????????? How?????? Zoology: In zoology, science licks you seananmcguire Anthropology: Maybe ask first Herpetology: bad plan bad plan BAD PLAN whisperwhisk Sociology: Yes, if you have time and dedication and a willingness to piss a lot of people off. Botany: You might hallucinate or die, OR it might be delicious Computer Science: the tingle of electricity on your tongue is how you know it's working Epidemiology: FOR THE SAKE OF THE WORLD PLEASE DO NOT carpebutts Linguistics: Despite the name, please probably don't spooky-son-of-rome Engineering: Maybe, but it'll probably taste like spreadsheets small-home-repair-vikings Software engineering: nothing else has made the code work so you might as well try it swordwall Neuroscience: that is someone's brain. no. do not tinysquidrachel Marine biology: you can try, but you'll probably just get a mouthful of seawater thesketcherlass Astronomy: look, if your dedication to lick Uranus is what it takes get humankind to another planet, then so be it Source: snowysauropteryx 280,607 notes Can you lick the science? A comprehensive guide on which scientific careers one is able to taste what they study

Can you lick the science? A comprehensive guide on which scientific careers one is able to taste what they study

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Bad, Work, and Best: snowysauropteryx Can you lick the science? An abbreviated list. Genetics: Do not. Unless cheek swabs? Archaeology: Perhaps. But might be human bone. Geology: Sometimes needed, sometimes dangerous Psychology: Best not. Physics: ????????? How?????? Zoology: In zoology, science licks you seananmcguire Anthropology: Maybe ask first Herpetology: bad plan bad plan BAD PLAN whisperwhisk Sociology: Yes, if you have time and dedication and a willingness to piss a lot of people off. Botany: You might hallucinate or die, OR it might be delicious Computer Science: the tingle of electricity on your tongue is how you know it's working Epidemiology: FOR THE SAKE OF THE WORLD PLEASE DO NOT carpebutts Linguistics: Despite the name, please probably don't spooky-son-of-rome Engineering: Maybe, but it'll probably taste like spreadsheets small-home-repair-vikings Software engineering: nothing else has made the code work so you might as well try it swordwall Neuroscience: that is someone's brain. no. do not tinysquidrachel Marine biology: you can try, but you'll probably just get a mouthful of seawater thesketcherlass Astronomy: look, if your dedication to lick Uranus is what it takes get humankind to another planet, then so be it Source: snowysauropteryx 280,607 notes Can you lick the science? A comprehensive guide on which scientific careers one is able to taste what they study

Can you lick the science? A comprehensive guide on which scientific careers one is able to taste what they study

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America, Memes, and Nasa: The Mississippi River Delta has been an area of intense study for, among other things, the dynamic growth and loss of land experienced in the region due to natural and man-made causes. Although coastal wetlands are typically the topic of conversation, a recent paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters (Ortiz, Roy, & Edmonds, 2017) explores how pond expansion due to wind contributes to land loss, an inland erosion process referred to as ‘internal fragmentation.’ The scientists analyzed about 10,000 satellite images taken between 1982 and 2016 by the Landsat 8 satellite (a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey and NASA launched in 2013), and found that ponds in the area tend to grow in the direction of the prevailing winds. Their research led them to suggest that ponds in the Terrebonne and Barataria basins are unstable, where 80 percent of ponds are expanding. This image shows the area of study along the Atchafalaya Delta of Louisiana, which the authors deemed stable due to the fact that there are nearly as many ponds contracting as expanding. Have you ever visited the Mississippi River Delta region? Tell us your story! Photo: NASA, Joshua Stevens, U.S. Geological Survey. guffscience science geology geography river delta nature erosion earth education naturephotography bestoftheday interesting didyouknow nowyouknow america unitedstates nasa usgs mississippi louisiana mississippiriver mississippiriverdelta

The Mississippi River Delta has been an area of intense study for, among other things, the dynamic growth and loss of land experienced in th...

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America, Memes, and American: The formidable Black Canyon of the Gunnison River is an awe-inspiring canyon in the American West most famous for its dramatic depth, extremely steep cliffs, narrowness, and unforgiving darkness. Located in western Colorado and millions of years in the making, the Black Canyon stretches for 77 kilometers (48 miles), with the deepest (and arguably the most spectacular) 22.5-kilometer (14-mile) section making up Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park. The canyon reaches a maximum depth of 829.7 meters (2,722 feet) at Warner Point (accessible from the south), making it almost exactly as deep as the tallest free-standing structure in the world, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, which is about 828 meters (2,716.5 feet) in height. The canyon is also very narrow, reaching a width of 12 meters (40 feet) at a section called ‘The Narrows.’ The Black Canyon gets its name from the fact that its severe steepness prevents much sunlight from piercing its depths, blanketing much of the canyon in shadow. In fact, author Duane Vandenbusche reports that sections of the Black Canyon only see 33 minutes of sunlight a day! What’s your favorite local canyon? Photo: NPS. guffscience science geology geography rock nature canyon river earth education naturephotography bestoftheday interesting didyouknow nowyouknow america unitedstates colorado montrose nps blackcanyon gunnison gunnisonnationalpark blackcanyonofthegunnisonnationalpark

The formidable Black Canyon of the Gunnison River is an awe-inspiring canyon in the American West most famous for its dramatic depth, extrem...

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