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Albert Einstein, Fam, and Tumblr: FAM PRO fakehistory: Albert Einstein conceives of the theory of general relativity, 1915 (Colorized)

fakehistory: Albert Einstein conceives of the theory of general relativity, 1915 (Colorized)

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Albert Einstein, College, and Einstein: Albert Einstein explaining his Theory of Relativity to college students (1922)

Albert Einstein explaining his Theory of Relativity to college students (1922)

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Earth, How, and Newton: How newton depicted earth to look like before writing his theory of relativity 1940

How newton depicted earth to look like before writing his theory of relativity 1940

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Apparently, Arguing, and Complex: STEPHEN HAWKINGS LAST WORDS WELIVEINTHEMATRI If you asked an astrophysicist today to describe what happened after the Big Bang, he would likely start with the concept of “cosmic inflation.” Cosmic inflation argues that right after the Big Bang — we’re talking after a teeny fraction of a second — the universe expanded at breakneck speed like dough in an oven. But this exponential expansion should create, due to quantum mechanics, regions where the universe continues to grow forever and regions where that growth stalls. The result would be a multiverse, a collection of bubblelike pockets, each defined by its own laws of physics. “The local laws of physics and chemistry can differ from one pocket universe to another, which together would form a multiverse,” Hertog said in a statement. “But I have never been a fan of the multiverse. If the scale of different universes in the multiverse is large or infinite the theory can’t be tested.” Along with being difficult to support, the multiverse theory, which was co-developed by Hawking in 1983, doesn’t jibe with classical physics, namely the contributions of Einstein’s theory of general relativity as they relate to the structure and dynamics of the universe. “As a consequence, Einstein’s theory breaks down in eternal inflation,” Hertog said. Einstein spent his life searching for a unified theory, a way to reconcile the biggest and smallest of things, general relativity and quantum mechanics. He died never having achieved that goal, but leagues of physicists like Hawking followed in Einstein’s footsteps. One path led to holograms. Instead of the 'standard' description of how the 'universe' unfolded (and is unfolding), the authors argue the Big Bang had a finite boundary, defined by string theory and holograms. The new theory - which sounds simplistically like the world of the red-pill-blue-pill Matrix movies - embraces the strange concept that the universe is like a vast and complex hologram. In other words, 3D reality is an illusion, and that the apparently "solid" world around us - and the dimension of time - is projected from information stored on a flat 2D surface.

If you asked an astrophysicist today to describe what happened after the Big Bang, he would likely start with the concept of “cosmic inflati...

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Anaconda, Waves, and Holes: The collision of a pair of neutron stars, marked by ripples through the fabric of space-time and a flaslh brighter than a billion suns, has been witnessed for the first time in the most intensely observed astronomical event to date. The sequence, in which the two ultra-dense stars spiralled inwards, violently collided and, in all likelihood, immediately collapsed into a black hole, was first picked up by the US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (Ligo). It's probably the first observation of a black hole being created where there was none before. Gravitational waves were first directly detected two years ago, proving Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. Those gravitational waves were the result of two black holes colliding, and the signal lasted for only a fraction of a second. Because black holes don't emit light, these waves were invisible and only "heard" as thumps This discovery of two neutron stars colliding to create the same type of waves, in addition to light, allowed astronomers to study gravitational waves in a new way. The signal lasted for 100 seconds, providing them with even more data and insight. It revealed that light and gravitational waves travel at the same speed. Previously, scientists had speculated that the sheer force of neutron star collisions would be enough to force extra neutrons into the nuclei of atoms, forging heavy elements like gold and platinum, but until now this idea was purely theoretical. "This is the first real confirmation that heavy elements such as gold, platinum and uranium are either solely or predominantly produced in binary neutron star collisions," Dave Reitze, executive director of Ligo, "The wedding band on your finger or the gold watch you're wearing was most likely produced a billion years ago by two neutron stars colliding. That's pretty cool. Theories and mysteries were tested and revealed in this rare observation. Events like this happen less than 100 times per million years in a galaxy First-Seen Neutron Stars Collision Solve Major Astronomical Mysteries

First-Seen Neutron Stars Collision Solve Major Astronomical Mysteries

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