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noctiscorvus: squirenonny: anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when looking up this article for clarification i found this one that points out that period pain is actually typically MUCH WORSE than heart attacks - as heart attacks more commonly have dull pains  and, interestingly: Period pain happens mostly because of substances called prostaglandins, Gunter explained in the post. They’re released from the lining of the uterus and make it contract. And during these period contractions, pressure on the uterus can be just as high as it is during the “pushing” stage of labor, she added.“So if you need an analogy to describe period pain,” Gunter wrote, “use labor or cutting your finger off without an anesthetic.” “If you are waiting for terrible, excruciating chest pain to tell you that you are having a heart attack, well, you are going to miss the heart attack,” Gunter wrote. “Heart attacks often produce vague symptoms or mild pain, that is why many people ignore them … In addition, more than 40% of women have no pain with heart attacks. It would be dangerous for women to think that a heart attack should be at least as bad as their menstrual cramps.” ^^^ Important point from that article. It sounds like a dramatic comparison. “Cramps are as bad as heart attacks?!” But not only does it still actually downplay the pain many menstruating people feel, it increases the risk that those same people will ignore a heart attack because it doesn’t hurt enough to worry them. Can I add on that a lot of women think they’re suffering from menstrual cramps and do their best to go about their day when in reality their appendix is seconds away from bursting? This happens a lot. Seriously. : noctiscorvus: squirenonny: anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when looking up this article for clarification i found this one that points out that period pain is actually typically MUCH WORSE than heart attacks - as heart attacks more commonly have dull pains  and, interestingly: Period pain happens mostly because of substances called prostaglandins, Gunter explained in the post. They’re released from the lining of the uterus and make it contract. And during these period contractions, pressure on the uterus can be just as high as it is during the “pushing” stage of labor, she added.“So if you need an analogy to describe period pain,” Gunter wrote, “use labor or cutting your finger off without an anesthetic.” “If you are waiting for terrible, excruciating chest pain to tell you that you are having a heart attack, well, you are going to miss the heart attack,” Gunter wrote. “Heart attacks often produce vague symptoms or mild pain, that is why many people ignore them … In addition, more than 40% of women have no pain with heart attacks. It would be dangerous for women to think that a heart attack should be at least as bad as their menstrual cramps.” ^^^ Important point from that article. It sounds like a dramatic comparison. “Cramps are as bad as heart attacks?!” But not only does it still actually downplay the pain many menstruating people feel, it increases the risk that those same people will ignore a heart attack because it doesn’t hurt enough to worry them. Can I add on that a lot of women think they’re suffering from menstrual cramps and do their best to go about their day when in reality their appendix is seconds away from bursting? This happens a lot. Seriously.

noctiscorvus: squirenonny: anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when look...

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anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when looking up this article for clarification i found this one that points out that period pain is actually typically MUCH WORSE than heart attacks - as heart attacks more commonly have dull pains  and, interestingly: Period pain happens mostly because of substances called prostaglandins, Gunter explained in the post. They’re released from the lining of the uterus and make it contract. And during these period contractions, pressure on the uterus can be just as high as it is during the “pushing” stage of labor, she added.“So if you need an analogy to describe period pain,” Gunter wrote, “use labor or cutting your finger off without an anesthetic.” : PureWow Follow @PureWow Doctors Confirm Period Cramps Are as Painful as a Heart Attack (and No Woman on Earth Is Surprised) bit.ly/210Qex9 RRR RERRR 17 Jun 2019 8:58 AM SkinnyPetite Follow @RethabileQobose Replying to @PureWow I complained once, I got sent this When my girl has her period Ijust ignore her till she goes back to normal. I don't know who that other woman is... and | don't talk to strangers100 anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when looking up this article for clarification i found this one that points out that period pain is actually typically MUCH WORSE than heart attacks - as heart attacks more commonly have dull pains  and, interestingly: Period pain happens mostly because of substances called prostaglandins, Gunter explained in the post. They’re released from the lining of the uterus and make it contract. And during these period contractions, pressure on the uterus can be just as high as it is during the “pushing” stage of labor, she added.“So if you need an analogy to describe period pain,” Gunter wrote, “use labor or cutting your finger off without an anesthetic.”

anaryllis: uncommonbish: I can’t count how many times men have humiliated me by “IT’S JUST PERIOD” when looking up this article for clar...

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Teach boys about periods via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2Z0YocM: bloodytales Teach boys about periods My mother also talked about periods to my brothers. When I first got mine I had terrible cramps. Crippling cramps. I once was camping with my family and a few of my big brother's friends when my period came. My cramps were so bad that my mom gave me a full pain killer (1 was 13 and before that she only gave me pills cut in half) T iterally laid down on my parents' air mattress and cried in pain for an hour before the pill kicked in. My brothers friend came in to the big tent and I was just curled up and sobbing. Now, I was quite the tomboy and was known to rough house with my brothers and their friends and made sure I wasnt seen as just "a little girl." So my brother's friend was confused to see me openly weeping in the fetal position (seriously, these were the worst cramps I have had in my life. My vision went white). He asked what was wrong with me. My big brother stood up immediately and suggested a nice long hike. During this hike I am sure he had a pretty awkward conversation with his friend explaining menstrual cramps, because when they got back the pain pill had (mostly) kicked in and I was sitting up at a table when my brother's friend sheepishly asked me if I was feeling better. I said I was better, and he said good. When we made s'mores that night my brother and his friend kept me well supplied with chocolate. Making sure sons know as much about periods and menstruation as daughters makes them better brothers, better sons better fathers, and better men. A man that understands a period will not lightly accuse a woman of "being on her period" if the woman is in an argument. Raise better sons Teach them about normal bodily functions Teach boys about periods via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2Z0YocM

Teach boys about periods via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2Z0YocM

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medicalbasics: pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - http://bit.ly/2ByDqHG According to my pharmacist mother some studies have shown that taking ibuprofen or another NSAID such as Aleve and then taking Tylenol a few hours later has the same pain killing power of narcotics without the addictive factor. That’s the combo I use when my cramps are really acting up.: When should I take: acetaminophen vs. ibuprofen? While both acetaminophen and ibuprofen provide relief these popular pain medications treat different ailments. Find out which remedy is best for you and how to take it correctly IBUPROFEN (Advil or Motrin) ACETAMINOPHEN (Tylenol) Pain Relief Best for Best for Muscle aches and joint pain Headaches Inflammation and swelling Lowering fever Menstrual pain Possible Side Effects . Upset stomach . Skin rash and blisters Heartburn . Stomach pain Warning: Stop taking immediately if a rash occurs. Tip: Take with food to help prevent upset stomach and ulcers. Toxicity . Increased risk of . Potential liver damage heart attack or stroke e Potential kidney damage Caution Be cautious of taking cold medications if you've already taken pain medicine. Many cold medications also contain acetaminophen, which may appear abbreviated as "APAP or "Acetam." Other over-the-counter products like naproxen (Aleve) are in the same class as ibuprofen and should not be taken WARNING Do NOT take Do NOT take: If you drink more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day If you have stomach ulcers or are taking blood pressure medication From the expert Both acetaminophen and ibuprofen are helpful for pain relief and reducing fever. However, ibuprofen also helps reduce sweling, while acetaminophen is generally safer and rarely has side effects. Remember that although both medications are available over-the- counter, each still carries risks Only take on an a basis and be careful not to exceed the recommended daily maximum dosage - Marwah Desoky, lead pharmacist at Sharp Coronado www.sharp.com/news 2016 Sharp HealthCare. All rights reserved SHARP medicalbasics: pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - http://bit.ly/2ByDqHG According to my pharmacist mother some studies have shown that taking ibuprofen or another NSAID such as Aleve and then taking Tylenol a few hours later has the same pain killing power of narcotics without the addictive factor. That’s the combo I use when my cramps are really acting up.

medicalbasics: pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - htt...

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faikitty: mermaibee: ultrafacts: According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, having no idea it is happening. Drowning does not look like drowning—Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the Instinctive Drowning Response like this: “Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.” This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc. Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water: Head low in the water, mouth at water level Head tilted back with mouth open Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus Eyes closed Hair over forehead or eyes Not using legs—vertical Hyperventilating or gasping Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway Trying to roll over on the back Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK—don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you all right?” If they can answer at all—they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents—children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why. Source/article: [x] Follow Ultrafacts for more facts! BOOST FOR THE SUMMER. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE. Can I just say thank you to OP for putting such a detailed description on this? I’ve been a lifeguard for 6 years now and of all the saves I’ve done, maybe two or three had people drowning in the stereotypical thrashing style. And even those, like the save I made last weekend, it was exactly like OP describes where the person’s head is going in and out of the water but it isn’t long enough to get any air. Mostly you recognize drowning by the look on someone’s face. If someone looks wide eyed and terrified or confused, chances are they’re drowning. That look of “oh shit” is pretty easily recognizable. And even if you can’t tell for sure: GO AFTER THEM ANYWAY. I’ve done “saves” where a kid was pretending to drown and I mistook it for real drowning, but that’s preferable to a kid ACTUALLY drowning. Also please remember that even strong swimmers can drown if they have a medical emergency, get cramps, or get too tired. If your friend knows how to swim but they’re acting funny get them to land. And even if someone can respond when you ask them if they need help, if they say they do need help? GO HELP THEM. However . If the victim is a stranger, I can’t recommend trying to get them. Lifeguards literally train to escape “attacks,” because people who are drowning can freak the fuck out and grab you and make YOU drown as well. If you do go in after someone, take hold of them from the back and talk to them the whole time. IF YOU ARE GRABBED: duck down into the water as low as you can get. The person is panicking and won’t want to go under water and should release you. Shove up at their hands and push them away from you as you duck under. Don’t die trying to save someone else. Please guys, read and memorize this post. Not all places have lifeguards. Being able to recognize drowning is such an important skill to have and you can save someone’s life. : Drowning in real life looks nothing like in the movies, and in fact many parents actually watch their children drown, having no idea that it's happening Ultrafacts.tumblr.com faikitty: mermaibee: ultrafacts: According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, having no idea it is happening. Drowning does not look like drowning—Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the Instinctive Drowning Response like this: “Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.” This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc. Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water: Head low in the water, mouth at water level Head tilted back with mouth open Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus Eyes closed Hair over forehead or eyes Not using legs—vertical Hyperventilating or gasping Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway Trying to roll over on the back Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK—don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you all right?” If they can answer at all—they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents—children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why. Source/article: [x] Follow Ultrafacts for more facts! BOOST FOR THE SUMMER. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE. Can I just say thank you to OP for putting such a detailed description on this? I’ve been a lifeguard for 6 years now and of all the saves I’ve done, maybe two or three had people drowning in the stereotypical thrashing style. And even those, like the save I made last weekend, it was exactly like OP describes where the person’s head is going in and out of the water but it isn’t long enough to get any air. Mostly you recognize drowning by the look on someone’s face. If someone looks wide eyed and terrified or confused, chances are they’re drowning. That look of “oh shit” is pretty easily recognizable. And even if you can’t tell for sure: GO AFTER THEM ANYWAY. I’ve done “saves” where a kid was pretending to drown and I mistook it for real drowning, but that’s preferable to a kid ACTUALLY drowning. Also please remember that even strong swimmers can drown if they have a medical emergency, get cramps, or get too tired. If your friend knows how to swim but they’re acting funny get them to land. And even if someone can respond when you ask them if they need help, if they say they do need help? GO HELP THEM. However . If the victim is a stranger, I can’t recommend trying to get them. Lifeguards literally train to escape “attacks,” because people who are drowning can freak the fuck out and grab you and make YOU drown as well. If you do go in after someone, take hold of them from the back and talk to them the whole time. IF YOU ARE GRABBED: duck down into the water as low as you can get. The person is panicking and won’t want to go under water and should release you. Shove up at their hands and push them away from you as you duck under. Don’t die trying to save someone else. Please guys, read and memorize this post. Not all places have lifeguards. Being able to recognize drowning is such an important skill to have and you can save someone’s life.
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corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely) : StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health ca...

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thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse : StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

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smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money

smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; the...

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