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Disney, Family, and Girls: Megan Greenwell @megreenwell after seeing 'get out' in a very white crowd, all of us cheering wildly for chris, i keep remembering this, from elif batuman's 'the idiot. recognize it and laugh. I found myself remembering the day in kindergarten whe the teachers showed us Dumbo: a Disney movie about a puny, weind looking circus elephant that everyone made fun of. As the story u- folded, I realized to my amazement that all the kids in the class, even the bullies, the ones who despised and tormented the weak and the ugly, were rooting against Dumbo's tormentors. Over and over thry laughed and cheered, both when Dumbo succeeded and when biu things happened to the bullies. But they're you, I thought to myel. How did they not know? They didn't know. It was astounding, im astounding truth. Everyone thougbt they were Dumbo. Again and again I saw the phenomenon repeated. The mosta trary and tyrannical girls, the ones who started secret clubs to ostr youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil.

youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of...

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Disney, Family, and Girls: Megan Greenwell @megreenwell after seeing 'get out' in a very white crowd, all of us cheering wildly for chris, i keep remembering this, from elif batuman's 'the idiot. recognize it and laugh. I found myself remembering the day in kindergarten whe the teachers showed us Dumbo: a Disney movie about a puny, weind looking circus elephant that everyone made fun of. As the story u- folded, I realized to my amazement that all the kids in the class, even the bullies, the ones who despised and tormented the weak and the ugly, were rooting against Dumbo's tormentors. Over and over thry laughed and cheered, both when Dumbo succeeded and when biu things happened to the bullies. But they're you, I thought to myel. How did they not know? They didn't know. It was astounding, im astounding truth. Everyone thougbt they were Dumbo. Again and again I saw the phenomenon repeated. The mosta trary and tyrannical girls, the ones who started secret clubs to ostr youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil.

youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified o...

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America, Gif, and Love: This isn't freedom, this is fear. ask-cap-america-anything: raavynndigital: minuiko: wintercyan: onegoodey: jumpingjacktrash: hobbitkaiju: verysharpteeth: jenngeek: doktorfylthe: Characterization done right. Steve Rogers in a single gif. We joke about Steve’s patriotism as his strong suit, but his actual strength was his sense of moral right. His whole philosophy is summed up in the line “I don’t like bullies” in the first movie. Steve loves his country. He loves it enough to be at the front of the line trying to fix what he sees as moral wrong in it. kehinki: #there isn’t even any indication he loves his country t b h#all we know is that he wants to fix what he deems morally impermissible#”I don’t like bullies /I don’t care where they’re from/”#that last bit is important steve rogers is patriotic in the most real sense: he represents the concept at the core of the american ideal, the concept of freedom that is the reason our political system is designed to adapt and alter itself for constant improvement. he is not loyal to any momentary leader or agenda, and when those leaders and agendas stand contrary to his core ideal of self-determination and freedom from oppression, he’ll speak up without hesitation. honestly, i never would’ve thought captain america would be my favorite superhero, but he’s the activist i aspire to be. Captain America is loyal to nothing but the dream. The problem with Captain America’s image in the public mind is that people recite the first line of his byword and ignore the last part : “My country, right or wrong;if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right.” Not to mention his speech in Spiderman #537. My favorite line from the issue: “This nation was founded on one principle above all else: The requirement that we stand up for what we believe, no matter the odds or the consequences. When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree besides the river of truth, and tell the whole world— —No, you move.” Steve Rogers is a radical and that’s why I love him. I agree with all this.
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Bad, Books, and Candy: The creative writing classatmy school is writing children's books. This is a list the teacher made of books not to write. 1. You are Different and That's Bad 2. The Boy Who Died From Eating All His Vegetables 3. Dad's New Wife Greg 4. Fun Four-letter Words to Know and Share 5. Hammers, Screwdrivers and Scissors: An "I-Can-Do-It Book 6. The Kids Guide to Hitchhiking 7. Kathy Was So Bad Her Mommy Stopped Loving Her 8 Curious George and the High-Voltage Fence 9. All Cats Go to Hell 10. The Little Sissy Who Snitched 11. Some Kittens Can Fly 12, That's It: I'm Putting You Up for Adoption 13. Grandpa Gets a Casket 14. The Magic World Inside the Abandoned Refrigerator 15. Garfield Gets Feline Leukemia 16. The Pop-Up Book of Human Anatomy 17. Strangers Have the Best Candy 18. Whining, Kicking and Crying to Get your Way 19. You were an Accident 20. Things Rich Kids Have, But You Never Will 21 Popl Goes the Hamster. And Other Great Microwave Games 22. The Man in the Moon is Actually Satan 23. Your Nightmares Are Real 24. Where Would You Like to be Buried? 25. Eggs. Toilet Paper, and Your School 26. Why Can't Mr. Fork and Ms. Electrical Outlet Be Friends? 27 Places Where Mommy and Daddy Hide Neat Things 28. Daddy Drinks Because You Cry 29. The Surprise at the Bottom of the Pool 30. Making Grown-Up Friends On the Internet 31. 101 Fun Games To Play in the Road 32. You Can't Help It If You're Stupid 33. Patty Went Splati (Don't YOU Forget Your Seatbelt) 34. Bullies Deserve To Die 35. Go to Your Room: Mommy's Got A New Baby To Love 36 Timmy's The Wrong Color To Be your Friend 37. I Dare You! 101 Challenges To Prove You're Not A Sissy 38. Trixie Goes to the Big City srsfunny:Books That Should Probably Never Be Written

srsfunny:Books That Should Probably Never Be Written

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