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ochyming: Charles White Headlines, 1944 © The Charles White Archives. Photo by Gregory R. Staley.  Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art : onetenth ot Butler county, there nevec move o sol- ir Presl- REPORT FROM THE NATION Dixie Ways Rule Memphis; Skilled Jobs For White Only begun , when Texas at to the eallng the idicrs 50 Farmers Prefer Jail To Aceptanceaf Negroes Officer Tells Southerners Race Bias Not Tolerated 3tand tions R came on ttee of the soldler votel at adopted Although femp mber of Commerco By BENJAMIN F. BELL JR. Executive Seereiary, Memphls Urban Leagae Tbis is th d to pe MEMPHIS-Job opporta doa tles (or the Negro ke and Navy here, in spite o aseertaln theexigencles, have fot the trad apendmen ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Jan. (ANP)- n tolerate no racial fooling at Aberdeen, declared Kelly, director of training for the Aberdeen cement Training center, in a recent leeture basic trainees in the heater on hax comme from a reginentwith a ing. record onee resses of lpart fo owed and nav atter So are msta ১০ spill- f গ post.Yon mansbi the T , and rvealed i ieir messs 24 Gag? newspaper Press re Nazis Divide Worker o Prevent Organiza ong hefore the Nazis made a science of race in- was an effecive antlelabor wespon, his History of Bigotry In the Unite Yark $3.50). Even a superf ment will agree. Union ar yera and the frand by wieh mon leading familes go the ntory of ngotry to eary colonial New En brings the reader to e gbFather Ca the Cbris1 JANUARY 22, 1944 Smith Committee in Try Speakers Link Anti-Negroism He Sorde Nogro RiahAnti-Semitism, ochyming: Charles White Headlines, 1944 © The Charles White Archives. Photo by Gregory R. Staley.  Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art
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slightlypsychicparade: thatpettyblackgirl: No kneeling. No marching.#BlackExcellence Ugh. Okay, this is NOT the whole story. The city of Memphis wanted the statues removed, but their state’s legislature decided to be a big bag of dicks about it and passed a law forbidding them from doing so. To get around this, a plan was devised: the city could sell the parks to a private organization and now that it was private property, the state couldn’t tell them what they could and couldn’t do with that property. The city counsel voted under cover of darkness to sell the park to the non-profit run by these men, and construction vehicles immediately moved in to remove the statues. They were gone by morning. Like… this is still #BlackExcellence because (and correct me if I’m wrong here) Memphis is a predominantly black city. I just think it’s important to remember that this was a community effort and not the work of individuals. Fascists love to worship the narratives of “Great Men.” It is the responsibility of the resistance to remember that nothing can happen without the support of the community. : Tariq Nasheed @tariqnasheed Follow Insitoad ()i. marching 8' bo(jging for the city to remove Confederate statues from city parks, e lack rnn in Meermphis purchased the parks that had statues of Jefferson Davis & Nathan Bedford Forrest (founder of the KKK). Then THEY had the statues removed from THEIR property #Salute 1:48 334K views 1:06 PM-23 Dec 2017 721 t 13K 28K slightlypsychicparade: thatpettyblackgirl: No kneeling. No marching.#BlackExcellence Ugh. Okay, this is NOT the whole story. The city of Memphis wanted the statues removed, but their state’s legislature decided to be a big bag of dicks about it and passed a law forbidding them from doing so. To get around this, a plan was devised: the city could sell the parks to a private organization and now that it was private property, the state couldn’t tell them what they could and couldn’t do with that property. The city counsel voted under cover of darkness to sell the park to the non-profit run by these men, and construction vehicles immediately moved in to remove the statues. They were gone by morning. Like… this is still #BlackExcellence because (and correct me if I’m wrong here) Memphis is a predominantly black city. I just think it’s important to remember that this was a community effort and not the work of individuals. Fascists love to worship the narratives of “Great Men.” It is the responsibility of the resistance to remember that nothing can happen without the support of the community.
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<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p> </blockquote> <p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p> </blockquote> <p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p> <p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ using an outdated term for transgender people is “<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad “<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p> <p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p> <p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p> <p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p> <p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender “<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“ I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity “<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad. “<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“ It’s not going to kill you “<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“ It’s not that hard a concept to understand. “<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote> <p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p> </blockquote> <p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p> </blockquote> <p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p> <p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ using an outdated term for transgender people is “<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad “<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p> <p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p> <p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p> <p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p> <p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender “<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“ I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity “<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad. “<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“ It’s not going to kill you “<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“ It’s not that hard a concept to understand. “<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote> <p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>
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<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>

<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his...

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"It wouldn't happen if they came the legal way!" Are you sure about that?: 4G 17:26 notyourexrotic t' ill 60% 2:07 PM Funmilayo Celestina Ekundayo Follow 5 hrs a 2 3 Citizenship 4 So i just got this message when i attempted to update my voter registration Voter Info Additional Info This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. Citizenship Information I have voted in 2 elections; i have an American passport 've traveled with, and i have gone to the Department of safety and homeland security to update all information, last time i did was 2 years ago when i needed a copy of my social security card Fields marked with are required fields According to records at the Department of Safety and Homeland Security, you are not a citizen of the United States. If you recently became a citizen, your record has not yet been updated with the Tennessee Department of Safety. Please enter your date of citizenship and your naturalization number below. If you are not a U.S. citizen, do not complete this application. So, a warning to all naturalized citizens, check that shit now Something is happening update I have confirmed others that are having this issue. Folks, this is Not a drill!! Check your statuses. update 2 Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an immigration officer". The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes. I will try again on Monday. Until then, i am taking my passport with me Everywhere!! EVERYWHERE!! If you believe you have reached this screen in error, please contact the Division of Elections at 1-877-850 4959 Date of U.S. Citizenship:* Naturalization Number: Naturalized US citizens are reporting that the DHS website is listing them as "not a citizen" From Funmilayo Celestina Ekundayo So i just got this message when i attempted to update my voter registration This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. 4G 17:26 This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. I have voted in 2 elections, i have an American passport I've traveled with, and i have gone to the Department of safety and homeland security to update all information, last time i did was 2 years ago when i needed a copy of my social security card So, a warning to all naturalized citizens inTennessee check your status now!! https://ovr.govote.tn.gov/Registration Something is happening *update* I have confirmed others that are having this issue. Folks, this is Not a drill!! Check your statuses update 2* Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an "immigration officer The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes 4G 17:26 Check your statuses update 2* Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an "immigration officer The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes I will try again on Monday Until then, i am taking my passport with me Everywhere!! EVERYWHERE!!! clover1982 This is not a drill clover1982 https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists /in-america-naturalized-citizens-no-longer-have-an assumption-of-permanence Fuente: notyourexrotic 21,978 notas "It wouldn't happen if they came the legal way!" Are you sure about that?
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"It wouldn't happen if they came the legal way!" Are you sure about that?: 4G 17:26 notyourexrotic t' ill 60% 2:07 PM Funmilayo Celestina Ekundayo Follow 5 hrs a 2 3 Citizenship 4 So i just got this message when i attempted to update my voter registration Voter Info Additional Info This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. Citizenship Information I have voted in 2 elections; i have an American passport 've traveled with, and i have gone to the Department of safety and homeland security to update all information, last time i did was 2 years ago when i needed a copy of my social security card Fields marked with are required fields According to records at the Department of Safety and Homeland Security, you are not a citizen of the United States. If you recently became a citizen, your record has not yet been updated with the Tennessee Department of Safety. Please enter your date of citizenship and your naturalization number below. If you are not a U.S. citizen, do not complete this application. So, a warning to all naturalized citizens, check that shit now Something is happening update I have confirmed others that are having this issue. Folks, this is Not a drill!! Check your statuses. update 2 Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an immigration officer". The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes. I will try again on Monday. Until then, i am taking my passport with me Everywhere!! EVERYWHERE!! If you believe you have reached this screen in error, please contact the Division of Elections at 1-877-850 4959 Date of U.S. Citizenship:* Naturalization Number: Naturalized US citizens are reporting that the DHS website is listing them as "not a citizen" From Funmilayo Celestina Ekundayo So i just got this message when i attempted to update my voter registration This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. 4G 17:26 This is a lie. I became a naturalized citizen in 2005 Drove all the way to Memphis Tennessee for the ceremony. I have voted in 2 elections, i have an American passport I've traveled with, and i have gone to the Department of safety and homeland security to update all information, last time i did was 2 years ago when i needed a copy of my social security card So, a warning to all naturalized citizens inTennessee check your status now!! https://ovr.govote.tn.gov/Registration Something is happening *update* I have confirmed others that are having this issue. Folks, this is Not a drill!! Check your statuses update 2* Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an "immigration officer The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes 4G 17:26 Check your statuses update 2* Still trying to find answers. After calling the Department of homeland security and safety, i was told by the representative that he didn't know what was happening and would like to refer me to an "immigration officer The wait time is 57 minutes. The office closed in 17 minutes I will try again on Monday Until then, i am taking my passport with me Everywhere!! EVERYWHERE!!! clover1982 This is not a drill clover1982 https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists /in-america-naturalized-citizens-no-longer-have-an assumption-of-permanence Fuente: notyourexrotic 21,978 notas "It wouldn't happen if they came the legal way!" Are you sure about that?
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