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Anti-Vaxxer shutdown: ANTI VAXXER Here's a question for all of you, completely free of "antivaxxer doctrine why should a parent of a vaccinated child be worried about them coming into contact with an unvaccinated child? Isn't that why you vaccinate? So that if your child happens to come in contact with someone carrying a deadly disease, they're immunization protects them? A study was done where 80 people were vaccinated for...polio l think? Rubella? I'd have to check, it's been a long time. The group was then exposed to the disease. EVERY SINGLE PERSON CONTRACTED IT No one is trying to perpetuate idiocy in my camp. read scientific articles published in scientific circles, and books written by, you guessed it, SCIENTISTS The lot of you have to come to grips with the fact that you've been indoctrinated into believing something that pharmaceutical companies rely on you to defend with the fervor that you're currently showing. It's a money making scam. How many of you know that there is a private court system specifically handling vaccine related deaths, which pays out millions of dollars each year? I'm gonna guess none of you. Because the only group that fact checks less than religious groups, is the pro vaccine community. And Ellie, if you can't engage in an intelligent conversation, choosing instead to proverbially stick your fingers in your ears, then you're not the kind of person l thought you were Like Reply May 31 at 8:32am Okay. Tag me in ike Reply May 31 at 8:49am okay. Tag me in May 31 at 8:49am First of all. As far as "SCIENTISTS" are concerned. I am one So lets start with that. I have a BS in Biochemistry, a minor in Microbiology, worked in the US Navy as an Analytical Chemist for Nuclear Reactors Division l currently do academic neuroscience research for Alzheimer's/Parkinson's treatments at Vanderbilt (which by the way we are in contracts with many "evil" Big Pharma companies, you know, doing just awful things here to try to screw the public), and l'll be going to medical school this fall. So have l met my science criteria yet? Good Lets start by agreeing that you are not going to attempt to link vaccines to autism, right? can destroy that argument if need be but I'd rather focus on the "why to vaccinate" argument. Lets list some studies, IDK we'll start with a JAMA article summarizing 150 related works and publications by "SCIENTISTS" showing the morbidity and mortality of the diseases pre and post vaccine era. (if you don't want to really read, there are pictures and graphs) http://jama jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleida209448 Basically this is saying that there used to be like A LOT of these diseases, and now there is basically none in most cases, and severe reduction of incidence in others... this should cover the topic of whether or not they work...they ARE very efficacious. Okay, so they work? Are we in agreement or not? Next. "Why should parents with a vaccinated child... etc etc" There are two main things that serve as protection when it comes to vaccines. Personal immunity, which is the individual's immune system responding to being inoculated with a "disabled" version of the disease. Then there is herd immunity, as referenced here http://op12no2.me/stuffilherdhis.pdf Now that is a long read. The emphasis being, that while difficult to quantify accurately, the herd immunity is best summarized as follows: "That indirect protection occurs is obvious, both in logic and in "That indirect protection occurs is obvious, both in logic and in observation. Prevention of a communicable infection in any individual reduces by one the potential sources of infection--and, hence, the potential risk (which is a probability by definition) of infection--for that individual's peers. That is indirect protection and a form of herd immunity. The observation of apparent exceptions, small communities in which infections appear to be transmitted despite very high levels of vaccination coverage, do not refute this principle, just as the failure of vaccination in some individual recipients need not refute an overall high efficacy ofthe vaccines So to answer why parents should vaccinate It is for the safety of the general population. Every 1 person not vaccinated creates an exponential number of interactions that can spread a preventable disease and effect those who are at risk. Those groups being: lmmunocompromised, those with allergies, kids with congenital heart problems, children that need to take steroids, pregnant women, newborns, people who have had transplants and so on Lets also go with this study you quoted. First of a l couldn't find it but lets assume you are correct. Because it is true, no cure or treatment can be 100% effective. Also, you know that a vaccine is technically giving someone an infection to begin with. So l would need to see the materials and methods section of their study. Lastly, 80 people is not even remotely close to "significant" in terms of scientific statistical analysis. Which is also why the study would need to be peer review, reproduced and hold up under scrutiny. (I might add that scientists can make a hell of a living proving something that outstanding. So if it were that obvious that it didn't work, it would be a well known, proven theory) Private court system you say? Lawyers making a profit for themselves work, it would be a well known, proven theory) Private court system you say? Lawyers making a profit for themselves and others by filing lawsuits? REALLY? That is unheard of! That is obvious proof of wrongdoing Look, vaccines have downsides, but you know what else does too? All the diseases they have allowed us to control, if not eradicate. People have been filing lawsuits against anyone, and everyone for the better part of the last 50 years. Especially against medical professionals where the payout can be huge. There might be complications, allergic reactions, and such from vaccines. These cases are rare, and a very acceptable risk when compared to the benefit. Its really not hard to see that. understand your perception that its your right to choose, and you can do what you want. That applies to speed limits too, you can drive as fast as you want, but that doesn't make it any less true that you are endangering others when you do. We have to protect the whole population, as best we can. Vaccines are a way to do that. Okay, I've edited this to make it as clear as l could. l am off to go do evil research in our secret underground laboratory where we lobotomize people for funsies, then come up with ways to scam the public over lunch. In all seriousness though think Big Pharma's business execs might make decisions for profitable reasons which they have every right to do, It is a business and this is a dog-eat-dog capitalist world we live in But the scientists are still doing great work, so don't get so screwed up by tunnel vision that you think everyone is in on some evil plot (99 Anti-Vaxxer shutdown

Anti-Vaxxer shutdown

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@rethinkvaccines except there is no evidence vaccines caused any of that. Just because B comes after A does not mean you can say A caused B. That is the most basic of logical fallacies. "Paul Offit likes to tell a story about how his wife, pediatrician Bonnie Offit, was about to give a child a vaccination when the kid was struck by a seizure. Had she given the injection a minute sooner, Paul Offit says, it would surely have appeared as though the vaccine had caused the seizure and probably no study in the world would have convinced the parent otherwise. (The Offits have such studies at the ready — Paul is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and author of “Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All.”) Indeed, famous anti-vaxxer Jenny McCarthy has said her son’s autism and seizures are linked to “so many shots” because vaccinations preceded his symptoms. But, as Offit’s story suggests, the fact that a child became sick after a vaccine is not strong evidence that the immunization was to blame. Psychologists have a name for the cognitive bias that makes us prone to assigning a causal relationship to two events simply because they happened one after the other: the “illusion of causality.” https:-fivethirtyeight.com-features-your-brain-is-primed-to-reach-false-conclusions- Follow my other accounts @Young_Tea_Party_, @TheBurkeSociety and @Crux.Est.Amoris Follow my other admin at @southern_conservative_ Read my WordPress, Link in the bio https:-mrcredible.wordpress.com- Follow me on FaceBook at @TheCredible and on Twitter at @_Credible_Hulk CredibleHulkOriginal Bias: Conservatism and Catholicism: vaccines did, in fact, "cause my son to have Autism. also killed my neighbor's daughter. Both thin 2 hours, to the shot with temperatures d my son in a tepid bath and did everything the three days that his temperature ranged 01 and 105. My neighbor's daughter went sions on the way to the hospital and was On IG Credible Hulk I WILL JUST SIT HERE WAIT FOR ENIDENC @rethinkvaccines except there is no evidence vaccines caused any of that. Just because B comes after A does not mean you can say A caused B. That is the most basic of logical fallacies. "Paul Offit likes to tell a story about how his wife, pediatrician Bonnie Offit, was about to give a child a vaccination when the kid was struck by a seizure. Had she given the injection a minute sooner, Paul Offit says, it would surely have appeared as though the vaccine had caused the seizure and probably no study in the world would have convinced the parent otherwise. (The Offits have such studies at the ready — Paul is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and author of “Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All.”) Indeed, famous anti-vaxxer Jenny McCarthy has said her son’s autism and seizures are linked to “so many shots” because vaccinations preceded his symptoms. But, as Offit’s story suggests, the fact that a child became sick after a vaccine is not strong evidence that the immunization was to blame. Psychologists have a name for the cognitive bias that makes us prone to assigning a causal relationship to two events simply because they happened one after the other: the “illusion of causality.” https:-fivethirtyeight.com-features-your-brain-is-primed-to-reach-false-conclusions- Follow my other accounts @Young_Tea_Party_, @TheBurkeSociety and @Crux.Est.Amoris Follow my other admin at @southern_conservative_ Read my WordPress, Link in the bio https:-mrcredible.wordpress.com- Follow me on FaceBook at @TheCredible and on Twitter at @_Credible_Hulk CredibleHulkOriginal Bias: Conservatism and Catholicism

@rethinkvaccines except there is no evidence vaccines caused any of that. Just because B comes after A does not mean you can say A caused...

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