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Target, Tumblr, and Blog: tughhfggdgvff: picsthatmakeyougohmm: hmmm This is what they like to call Environmental Storytelling

tughhfggdgvff: picsthatmakeyougohmm: hmmm This is what they like to call Environmental Storytelling

America, Children, and Community: ABC7 Eyewitness News @ABC7 Follow CALIFORNIA POLLUTION: Latinos, blacks breathe 40 percent more pollution than whites in California, study says STUDY FINDS RACIAL DISPARITY IN POLLUTION EXPOSURE EYEWITNESS NEWS Latinos, blacks breathe 40 percent more pollution than whites in CA: Study Latinos and African-Americans breathe about 40 percent more pollution than white people do in California, a new study has found. abc7.com mony @moneycaa Follow It's called environmental racism, not the air choosing lol. Our homes tend to be near industrial areas, oil mills, freeways, factories, etc. Black children are more likely to get asthma because of this. ABC7 Eyewitness News@ABC7 CALIFORNIA POLLUTION: Latinos, blacks breathe 40 percent more pollution than whites in California, study says abc7.la/2DaeCqa 4:47 PM 6 Feb 2019 14,828 Retweets 37,462 Likes 0O Follow @jessisdeadxxx Replying to @moneycaa I had no knowledge of environmental racism until I read local articles of section 8 apartments completely boxed in by 3 major interstates in Orlando, Florida. I was dumbfounded. Environmental racism is very real @ 37%@._--+ 1:22 AM atlantablackstar.com T-Mobile ATLaNTa BLacK STaR NEIGHBORHOOD IS KILLING In the historically Black community of Parramore in Orlando, Florida, residents are surrounded by highways. The exhaust produced by the more than 300,000 vehicles that pass through the neighborhood each day has created health problems, including cancer, asthma and other respiratory ailments. (Photo: environmentalstudiesblog) The struggle for environmental justice in low-income and Black communities continues. This is most certainly the case in Orlando, Florida. In the heart of one of the premier tourist destinations in the United States, the theme park capital of America, the residents of a historically Black community are having trouble breathing due to air pollution T-Mobile 1:22 AM @ 37% @ -0.+ a google.com m.huffpost.com HUFFPOSTI Even Breathing Is A Risk In One Of Orlando's Poorest Neighborhoods People inhale soot and noxious fumes from the car-laden highways encircling their historically black community. blackqueerblog: Clean water, clean air, access to nutritious food, etc; access based on zip code. A well known case of environmental racism is the Flint water crisis. Less effort goes into neighborhoods for poc and tending to them
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Target, Tumblr, and Blog: kauulii:i forgot how relaxing environmental studies are

kauulii:i forgot how relaxing environmental studies are

Anaconda, Family, and Homeless: fandomsandfeminism Thought: I do NOT think that 50% of the world's bilionaires should be WO- men. I think there shouldn't be any billionaires at all cardboardfacewoman So you are saying 0% of the world should be billionaires? fandomsandfeminism Yes caosdth Why shouldn't their be billionaires? That makes no sense. fandomsandfeminism Because the existence of billionaires is predicated on the exploitation of human labor and unsustainable 4G the exploitation of human labor and unsustainable environmental harm. That level of wealth hoarding is harmful to economies, as it reduces the amount of mo- ney in circulation. No one person, no family, could ever conceivably even SPEND a billion dollars anyway, and it is inherently immoral to accumulate wealth so narrowly while so much of the world lives in abject poverty Better then to create a wealth ceiling, a point at which all wealth over a certain point is taxed at or very near 100% to incentivize people to actually spend their mo- ney rather than hoard it, stimulating the economy and bettering the lives of far more people. Better even still to create and regulate economic systems that protect wor- kers and the environment in a way that such extreme levels of wealth accumulation aren't even feasible. aflawedmind The problem with this is that it reduces the incentive to actually do fiscally well. What's the point of starting a business if you can't become wealthy? fandomsandfeminism There is a very real difference between "reasonably wealthy" and A BILLIONAIRE twodotsknowwhy wealthy" and A BILLIONAIRE twodotsknowwhy No one is saying you shouldn't have a nice house, we are saying that having multiple really, really ridiculously nice houses while your employees are either homeless or at serious risk of becoming homeless is immoral whenandwhereienter I'll never understand why this concept is hard for people. I think it's because they can't actually fathom how much $1 Billion is fandomsandfeminism Seriously Lets say you have a badass job. A great job. You make $100 AN HOUR. You work 10 hours a day ($1000 A DAY), 5 days a week ($5000 a week!!), every week ($20,000 A MONTH), thats $240,000 Every Year. It would take you 4,167 years to make a billion dollars Fuente: fandomsandfeminism 129,277 notas Excessive wealth comes from excessive misery.
Drinking, Energy, and Life: THE LAST STRAW TOSSEL on Reason <p><a href="http://redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com/post/176022832961/plastic-straw-myths-do-you-enjoy-sipping" class="tumblr_blog">redbloodedamerica</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2> Plastic Straw Myths </h2><blockquote><p> Do you enjoy sipping drinks through plastic straws?  Well, if activists get their way you won’t be allowed to anymore.  “These must be banned,” they say.  </p><p>Why?</p><p>When celebrities speak, politicians listen.  Seattle recently banned straws, and other places want to do the same.  “The idea that you’re going to ban straws and save the world is ridiculous.”  Angela Logomasini studies environmental issues at the Competitive Enterprise Institute.  What will banning plastic straws accomplish?  “Probably nothing at all.  It might make some people in Hollywood feel good.  It may make some politicians feel good, like they’re doing something.  It might sound good at parties, but it’s not going to solve any problems.” </p><p>Plastic pollution in the ocean <i>is</i> a real problem, but only about 1% of it comes from the United States.  Of that 1%, a tiny amount comes from plastic straws.  But what about that 500 million number?  Where do they all get that number?  They got it from this child’s school project.  He says he got the 500 million straws a day figure through a phone survey he conducted with straw manufacturers.  The media just accepts his 500 million number.  But the actual number is much lower according to the analysis firm Technomic.  </p><p>Okay, so activists and media exaggerate the problem.  Still they promised it would be easy to get rid of the straws. “If we can reduce something that is easy, that is polluting in the environment, that is getting stuck in turtles’ noses and causing damage to the environment, let’s do that,” says progressive talk show host Ethan Bearman.  “Sometimes we do need a little gentle guiding hand from government.”  <i>Governments gentle guiding hand</i> will either ban straws or order us to replace this cheap plastic straw with ones like these made of paper or bamboo.  “Plastic doesn’t actually biodegrade.  So unlike a lot of other things, paper, for example, actually breaks down into other components.”  </p><p>That’s not a good thing.  That means paper straws break down, even while you’re using them.  They get soggy, they leak.  “That’s the beauty of plastic, it’s enduring,” says Logomasini, “Paper straws are going to break down while you’re drinking with it.”  Paper and bamboo straws aren’t environmentally pristine either.  Paper products take more energy and more effort to produce.  You’re going to have a net negative environmental impact.  The paper doesn’t degrade in a landfill either.  Everything is essentially mummified.  <b>You’re replacing a superior product with an inferior one and you’re asking people to pay more for it.</b> It doesn’t make a lot of sense,” she says. </p><p>It doesn’t, and the higher price is the final result.  Paper straws are eight times more expensive to make than plastic straws.  Won’t this hurt businesses?  “I don’t think so.  Maybe people won’t use straws,” claims New York City Councilman Barry Grodenchik.   “If it’s a $1.79 to get the fountain drink at Joe’s corner deli that we’re talking about, and now it’s a $1.83, I don’t see that as being a huge difference in the price,” says Bearman.  </p><p>“This is what environmentalists will say about <i>every</i> policy they put out.  A few cents here, a few cents there eventually begins to become a burden,” explains Logomasini.  We don’t need straws.  “You know a lot of things in life are not <i>necessary</i>, but beneficial and enjoyable.  Banning straws isn’t going to do anything for the environment.  So what they’re just trying to do is take away my freedom for nothing in return.”  </p><p>As the environment has become cleaner, that’s become a specialty of the environmental movement: spend <i>your</i> money on feel-good policies that make no real difference.<br/></p></blockquote></blockquote>

redbloodedamerica: Plastic Straw Myths Do you enjoy sipping drinks through plastic straws?  Well, if activists get their way you won’t...