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tiggymalvern: mistfather: melanin-monrow: Also this Are we going to ignore that his slogan is “Hale Yes”?! Christopher Hale’s Republican opponent is Scott DesJarlais.His intimidation and emotional and physical abuse of first wife became public knowledge in 2010. He was reprimanded by the Tennessee medical board for having sex with patients in 2012. He has a consistently Republican anti-abortion voting record, despite the fact that he’s pressured multiple women into having abortions. That’s not hearsay, by the way - there’s a recording of a phone conversation in which he says that he did.He has continued to win every election for the past decade, the last two with a thirty point margin, because Republicans don’t care what kind of immoral, hypocritical, violent misogynist is representing them, only that he’s a Republican. : tiggymalvern: mistfather: melanin-monrow: Also this Are we going to ignore that his slogan is “Hale Yes”?! Christopher Hale’s Republican opponent is Scott DesJarlais.His intimidation and emotional and physical abuse of first wife became public knowledge in 2010. He was reprimanded by the Tennessee medical board for having sex with patients in 2012. He has a consistently Republican anti-abortion voting record, despite the fact that he’s pressured multiple women into having abortions. That’s not hearsay, by the way - there’s a recording of a phone conversation in which he says that he did.He has continued to win every election for the past decade, the last two with a thirty point margin, because Republicans don’t care what kind of immoral, hypocritical, violent misogynist is representing them, only that he’s a Republican.

tiggymalvern: mistfather: melanin-monrow: Also this Are we going to ignore that his slogan is “Hale Yes”?! Christopher Hale’s Republ...

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meara-eldestofthemall: girlactionfigure: Eugene Lazowski was a Polish doctor who saved thousands of Jews during the Holocaust by creating a fake epidemic that kept the Germans away from their town. Eugene received his medical degree before the war started. After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, he became a military doctor with the Polish resistance. He was imprisoned in a German POW camp for his anti-Nazi activities. After his release in 1942, Eugene moved to a small town, Rozwadow, with his wife and young daughter. There he reunited with a friend from medical school, Stanislaw Matulewicz.Stanislaw made a medical discovery that seemed minor but proved monumental. He found that healthy people could be injected with a typhoid vaccine that would make them test positive for the deadly disease without actually contracting it.Eugene hatched a brilliant plan. He knew that Germans tended to be germaphobes and were terrified of typhus, a contagious bacterial disease. When a Polish town was found to be infected with typhus, the German occupiers would quarantine the entire area. Eugene also knew that by implementing his plan, he risked the death penalty, which applied to Poles who helped Jews. Undeterred by the risk, Eugene injected thousands of people with typhus and sent blood samples to the Germans to report the “epidemic.” He made sure to inject non-Jews as well as Jews, so the Nazis wouldn’t just come in and massacre all the Jews in town. Because it appeared to be a widespread epidemic, the Nazis stayed clear of Rozwadow. By late 1943, the Gestapo was suspicious. The entire town was supposedly infested with typhus, yet nobody was dying. Eugene learned a German medical team was being sent to the quarantined area. He frantically approached the oldest and sickest-looking people in town and asked them to wait in a squalid shack. When the visitors arrived, the villagers welcomed them with a party - featuring large quantities of vodka. After the celebration, the German doctors were taken to the “patients.” Eugene said, “I told them to be my guest and examine the patients, but to be careful because the Polish are dirty and full of lice, which transfer typhus.”The doctors quickly took blood samples without conducting full examinations of the patients. When the samples tested positive for typhus, the German health authorities were satisfied the epidemic was still raging. They never came back.After the war, Eugene didn’t tell anybody of his heroic acts, not even his wife. It wasn’t until a documentary was produced in 2000 about the fake epidemic that Eugene received the accolades he deserved. He passed away in 2006 at age 92.For risking his his life to save the Jews of Rozwadow, Poland, we honor Dr. Eugene Lazowski as this week’s Thursday Hero. Accidental Talmudist It’s important to remember that not all heroes wear tights and a cape. : meara-eldestofthemall: girlactionfigure: Eugene Lazowski was a Polish doctor who saved thousands of Jews during the Holocaust by creating a fake epidemic that kept the Germans away from their town. Eugene received his medical degree before the war started. After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, he became a military doctor with the Polish resistance. He was imprisoned in a German POW camp for his anti-Nazi activities. After his release in 1942, Eugene moved to a small town, Rozwadow, with his wife and young daughter. There he reunited with a friend from medical school, Stanislaw Matulewicz.Stanislaw made a medical discovery that seemed minor but proved monumental. He found that healthy people could be injected with a typhoid vaccine that would make them test positive for the deadly disease without actually contracting it.Eugene hatched a brilliant plan. He knew that Germans tended to be germaphobes and were terrified of typhus, a contagious bacterial disease. When a Polish town was found to be infected with typhus, the German occupiers would quarantine the entire area. Eugene also knew that by implementing his plan, he risked the death penalty, which applied to Poles who helped Jews. Undeterred by the risk, Eugene injected thousands of people with typhus and sent blood samples to the Germans to report the “epidemic.” He made sure to inject non-Jews as well as Jews, so the Nazis wouldn’t just come in and massacre all the Jews in town. Because it appeared to be a widespread epidemic, the Nazis stayed clear of Rozwadow. By late 1943, the Gestapo was suspicious. The entire town was supposedly infested with typhus, yet nobody was dying. Eugene learned a German medical team was being sent to the quarantined area. He frantically approached the oldest and sickest-looking people in town and asked them to wait in a squalid shack. When the visitors arrived, the villagers welcomed them with a party - featuring large quantities of vodka. After the celebration, the German doctors were taken to the “patients.” Eugene said, “I told them to be my guest and examine the patients, but to be careful because the Polish are dirty and full of lice, which transfer typhus.”The doctors quickly took blood samples without conducting full examinations of the patients. When the samples tested positive for typhus, the German health authorities were satisfied the epidemic was still raging. They never came back.After the war, Eugene didn’t tell anybody of his heroic acts, not even his wife. It wasn’t until a documentary was produced in 2000 about the fake epidemic that Eugene received the accolades he deserved. He passed away in 2006 at age 92.For risking his his life to save the Jews of Rozwadow, Poland, we honor Dr. Eugene Lazowski as this week’s Thursday Hero. Accidental Talmudist It’s important to remember that not all heroes wear tights and a cape.
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derryderrydown: thecringeandwincefactory: meowren: malchay: So, I looked in the comments, expecting to see discourse or historical background etc, but I found none. Therefore, I decided to learn more and add background. Apparently this machine was used because of polio because polio paralyzes your lungs. According to the wiki article on this bad boy, patients would spend two weeks in there sometimes. They still have these machines, though much, much more modern but they’re barely used at all anymore: “In 1959, there were 1,200 people using tank respirators in the United States, but by 2004 there were only 39. By 2014, there were only 10 people left with an iron lung.” (x) I’ve read about one man who still lives in an iron lung. He taught himself how to breathe again by gulping down air, but it’s quite laborious because of the paralysis. His name is Paul Alexander, and he’s a lawyer. He’s 71 years old and has spent 65 years in an iron lung. Wild, right? He’s been working on a memoir that he was inspired to write by the recent resurgence of cases of polio caused by anti-vaccers. Source: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4414081 (can’t hyperlink because I’m on mobile, apologies) It’s amazing to me to recognize that we only defeated polio in this past century - that my mother’s father had it (he got lucky, it only deformed his feet and thereby kept him out of a couple wars); my mother got the big vaccination that left her upper arm scarred; and by the time I was vaccinated, polio basically didn’t exist. My grandfather must have been born like around 1900, so - in the space of less than 75 years, this was no longer something that parents dreaded the possibility of every summer. In the 1950s, my mother would go to the corner shop. The owners had a daughter a few years older than my mum. She lived in an iron lung in the back of the shop.Vaccinate your fucking kids. : derryderrydown: thecringeandwincefactory: meowren: malchay: So, I looked in the comments, expecting to see discourse or historical background etc, but I found none. Therefore, I decided to learn more and add background. Apparently this machine was used because of polio because polio paralyzes your lungs. According to the wiki article on this bad boy, patients would spend two weeks in there sometimes. They still have these machines, though much, much more modern but they’re barely used at all anymore: “In 1959, there were 1,200 people using tank respirators in the United States, but by 2004 there were only 39. By 2014, there were only 10 people left with an iron lung.” (x) I’ve read about one man who still lives in an iron lung. He taught himself how to breathe again by gulping down air, but it’s quite laborious because of the paralysis. His name is Paul Alexander, and he’s a lawyer. He’s 71 years old and has spent 65 years in an iron lung. Wild, right? He’s been working on a memoir that he was inspired to write by the recent resurgence of cases of polio caused by anti-vaccers. Source: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4414081 (can’t hyperlink because I’m on mobile, apologies) It’s amazing to me to recognize that we only defeated polio in this past century - that my mother’s father had it (he got lucky, it only deformed his feet and thereby kept him out of a couple wars); my mother got the big vaccination that left her upper arm scarred; and by the time I was vaccinated, polio basically didn’t exist. My grandfather must have been born like around 1900, so - in the space of less than 75 years, this was no longer something that parents dreaded the possibility of every summer. In the 1950s, my mother would go to the corner shop. The owners had a daughter a few years older than my mum. She lived in an iron lung in the back of the shop.Vaccinate your fucking kids.
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echoinggoat: digitaldancin: realityremedy: ellieisnotoldyet: I’ve been reading through the notes and I just have to say that I absolutely promise, promise, promise you that nobody in the dental surgery is there to judge you, and we’re certainly not mad at you. Cavities happen. Even to dentists. You think your dentist has a mouth full of virgin teeth? Unlikely! They’ve all visited eachother’s surgeries to get a quickie filling (ooh, saucy) between patients. They understand that life can get in the way of oral hygiene sometimes. They understand that life’s too short not to eat chocolate. They understand that you’ve got to live. I swear to you that everyone in that room is just there to help you. Please, please, please don’t stop going to the dentist because you’re worried they’ll be mad at you. It’s really not the case. They understand. It’s fine. It’s really, really fine. Please go to the dentist. I promise you it’s ok. You would not believe how comforting this is. This is comforting and all dont get me wrong, but…Virgin teeth-: echoinggoat: digitaldancin: realityremedy: ellieisnotoldyet: I’ve been reading through the notes and I just have to say that I absolutely promise, promise, promise you that nobody in the dental surgery is there to judge you, and we’re certainly not mad at you. Cavities happen. Even to dentists. You think your dentist has a mouth full of virgin teeth? Unlikely! They’ve all visited eachother’s surgeries to get a quickie filling (ooh, saucy) between patients. They understand that life can get in the way of oral hygiene sometimes. They understand that life’s too short not to eat chocolate. They understand that you’ve got to live. I swear to you that everyone in that room is just there to help you. Please, please, please don’t stop going to the dentist because you’re worried they’ll be mad at you. It’s really not the case. They understand. It’s fine. It’s really, really fine. Please go to the dentist. I promise you it’s ok. You would not believe how comforting this is. This is comforting and all dont get me wrong, but…Virgin teeth-

echoinggoat: digitaldancin: realityremedy: ellieisnotoldyet: I’ve been reading through the notes and I just have to say that I absolut...

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inferior-mirage: antifakiddie: queerlection: [Image description - Image of the intersex pride flag with the text: THE SEX BINARY IS A LIE. End description.] If you disagree with this, you’re denying that intersex people exist/have a right to exist, just sayin. I disagree with this because my intersex disorder (Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia) is not a different sex. My diagnosis is specific to the presentation and symptoms expressed in a female body. Many intersex diagnoses - including Klinefelter’s, Turner’s, and hypospadias - continue to resemble our birth sex without confusion. If you disagree with this, you’re denying how variations on human sexual dimorphism cause significant problems to our health and fertility. Disorders of sex development reveal variation, not deliberate and distinct categories. If you read the archives of intersex advocacy organizations like OII or ISNA, we strongly reject being othered as fake males and females. Your ableist approach to erasing our chromosomal and phenotypic abnormalities to mark us separate but equal is not shared by the intersex community, medical professionals, or intersex activists.  Dr. Leonard Sax wrote, “This type of extreme social constructionism is confusing and is not helpful to clinicians, to their patients, or to their patients’ families. Diluting the term intersex to include “any deviation from the Platonic ideal of sexual dimorphism” (Blackless et al., 2000, p. 152), deprives the term of any clinically useful meaning. The available data support the conclusion that human sexuality is a dichotomy, not a continuum. More than 99.98% of humans are either male or female. If the term intersex is to retain any clinical meaning, the use of this term should be restricted to those conditions in which chromosomal sex is inconsistent with phenotypic sex, or in which the phenotype is not classifiable as either male or female. The birth of an intersex child, far from being ‘a fairly common phenomenon,’ is actually a rare event, occurring in fewer than 2 out of every 10,000 births.” The Intersex Society of North America rejected raising intersex babies as a third sex with this statement: “Sorry, gender warriors… We believe there are two problems with trying to raise kids in a ‘third gender.’ First, how would we decide who would count in the ‘third gender’? How would we decide where to cut off the category of male and begin the category of intersex, or, on the other side of the spectrum, where to cut off the category of intersex to begin the category of female? Second, and much more importantly, we are trying to make the world a safe place for intersexed kids, and we don’t think labeling them with a gender category that in essence doesn’t exist would help them.” Your flag is a lie. “Having two arms is a lie and if you disagree with this you’re saying that people with birth defects that give them additional limbs don’t have a right to exist!” What the fuck kind of logic is that? Intersex is by definition a defect that exists outside of the norm. Gender may be more up for debate but sex is definitely a binary.: THE SEX BINARY IS A LIE inferior-mirage: antifakiddie: queerlection: [Image description - Image of the intersex pride flag with the text: THE SEX BINARY IS A LIE. End description.] If you disagree with this, you’re denying that intersex people exist/have a right to exist, just sayin. I disagree with this because my intersex disorder (Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia) is not a different sex. My diagnosis is specific to the presentation and symptoms expressed in a female body. Many intersex diagnoses - including Klinefelter’s, Turner’s, and hypospadias - continue to resemble our birth sex without confusion. If you disagree with this, you’re denying how variations on human sexual dimorphism cause significant problems to our health and fertility. Disorders of sex development reveal variation, not deliberate and distinct categories. If you read the archives of intersex advocacy organizations like OII or ISNA, we strongly reject being othered as fake males and females. Your ableist approach to erasing our chromosomal and phenotypic abnormalities to mark us separate but equal is not shared by the intersex community, medical professionals, or intersex activists.  Dr. Leonard Sax wrote, “This type of extreme social constructionism is confusing and is not helpful to clinicians, to their patients, or to their patients’ families. Diluting the term intersex to include “any deviation from the Platonic ideal of sexual dimorphism” (Blackless et al., 2000, p. 152), deprives the term of any clinically useful meaning. The available data support the conclusion that human sexuality is a dichotomy, not a continuum. More than 99.98% of humans are either male or female. If the term intersex is to retain any clinical meaning, the use of this term should be restricted to those conditions in which chromosomal sex is inconsistent with phenotypic sex, or in which the phenotype is not classifiable as either male or female. The birth of an intersex child, far from being ‘a fairly common phenomenon,’ is actually a rare event, occurring in fewer than 2 out of every 10,000 births.” The Intersex Society of North America rejected raising intersex babies as a third sex with this statement: “Sorry, gender warriors… We believe there are two problems with trying to raise kids in a ‘third gender.’ First, how would we decide who would count in the ‘third gender’? How would we decide where to cut off the category of male and begin the category of intersex, or, on the other side of the spectrum, where to cut off the category of intersex to begin the category of female? Second, and much more importantly, we are trying to make the world a safe place for intersexed kids, and we don’t think labeling them with a gender category that in essence doesn’t exist would help them.” Your flag is a lie. “Having two arms is a lie and if you disagree with this you’re saying that people with birth defects that give them additional limbs don’t have a right to exist!” What the fuck kind of logic is that? Intersex is by definition a defect that exists outside of the norm. Gender may be more up for debate but sex is definitely a binary.
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solarpunkarchivist: sanscarte: branwyn-says: lifehacksthatwork: Signs of a heart attack are different for each gender yet we only really teach the male warning signs. Make sure you’re aware of both and spread it to as many other women as possible! EVERY SINGLE TIME I HAVE TAKEN A CPR CLASS I have had to be that person who points out that the training videos ALWAYS frame the “male” symptoms as the default universal heart attack experience, while the “female” symptoms are framed as though they’re a deviation from the norm, rather than the primary symptom set that cis women experience.  ALSO: I just showed this post to my roommate, who is an MD at a clinic that specializes in care for the LGBT community in the Baltimore area. I asked her  whether hormones were responsible for the difference in the “male/female” symptom arrays. I asked how that would apply to her trans patients (which, she treats a LOT of trans patients). She said, basically, that the longer you’ve taken testosterone the more likely you are to get the intense chest pressure and the arm pain, versus the upper back pressure and shortness of breath. Obviously I am not a doctor myself, consult your own health care provider, etc. Reblogging this comment because this is the FIRST TIME I’ve ever seen someone address what XYZ medical condition would look like in trans patients. Also this is partly why my great-grandma died: the (male) doctor dismissed her heart attack as basically indigestion, because she didn’t have the typical male symptoms. Oh my God someone was able to answer the trans patient question! : Heart Attack Warning Signs A guide to better understand heart attack warning signs from Marshfield Clinic & Shine3bs Women Lightheadedness or dizziness Men Cold sweat or nausea Upper back pressure Chest pressure or pain Chest pressure Shortness of breath Shortness of breath Pain in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach Pain in one or both arms, the back, neck jaw or stomach Fainting or extreme fatigue If you have any of these 5 symptoms for more than 5 minutes and are unsure of Women might not experience the chest pain that is often noted as the most common sign of heart attack. the cause, call 9-1-1. Treatments work best if given Some women who have had heart within 1 hour of when heart attacks say they thought they had the symptoms associated with the flu attack symptoms begin. Experts at Heart Marshfield Clinic solarpunkarchivist: sanscarte: branwyn-says: lifehacksthatwork: Signs of a heart attack are different for each gender yet we only really teach the male warning signs. Make sure you’re aware of both and spread it to as many other women as possible! EVERY SINGLE TIME I HAVE TAKEN A CPR CLASS I have had to be that person who points out that the training videos ALWAYS frame the “male” symptoms as the default universal heart attack experience, while the “female” symptoms are framed as though they’re a deviation from the norm, rather than the primary symptom set that cis women experience.  ALSO: I just showed this post to my roommate, who is an MD at a clinic that specializes in care for the LGBT community in the Baltimore area. I asked her  whether hormones were responsible for the difference in the “male/female” symptom arrays. I asked how that would apply to her trans patients (which, she treats a LOT of trans patients). She said, basically, that the longer you’ve taken testosterone the more likely you are to get the intense chest pressure and the arm pain, versus the upper back pressure and shortness of breath. Obviously I am not a doctor myself, consult your own health care provider, etc. Reblogging this comment because this is the FIRST TIME I’ve ever seen someone address what XYZ medical condition would look like in trans patients. Also this is partly why my great-grandma died: the (male) doctor dismissed her heart attack as basically indigestion, because she didn’t have the typical male symptoms. Oh my God someone was able to answer the trans patient question!

solarpunkarchivist: sanscarte: branwyn-says: lifehacksthatwork: Signs of a heart attack are different for each gender yet we only real...

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unfriendly-black-hijabi: wahtdahel: Most of the medical research was done on white males and their response to medicine. This is why medical books should only serve as a framework but clinical expertise matters more. And this is why we need more black doctors. Black people are more likely to die from skin cancer for the same reason. It’s just diagnosed later. : LaShyra "Lash" Nolen @LashNolen Today we learned about Lyme disease and it's classic symptom: a bullseye rash (erythema migrans) formed around the area of a tick bite. A classmate of mine asked, "How is this diagnosed for those with darker skin?" Our professor struggled to give him a clear answer. 1/5 11:50 AM Oct 8, 2019 Twitter for iPho ne 2.1K Likes 845 Retweets LaShyra "Lash" Nolen @LashNolen 13h Replying to @LashNolen After class I decided to google what we learned to see what images came up. I wasn't surprised by what I found: a homogenous representation of the bullseye rash on white skin. . It's no wonder our professor didn't have a good answer to answer my classmate's question. 2/5 bullseye rash lyme X IMÁGENES TODOS SHOPPING NOTICIAS Más recientes Producto HD GIF it tick bites erythema migrans deer tick t1 37 1 323 LaShyra "Lash" Nolen @LashNolen 13h I'm learning more and more that medicine is taught in a way that is often times exclusionary and the treatment and manifestation of disease in those with melinated skin is treated as an afterthought, a "special case" of illness that students must do extra work to understand. 3/5 ti 140 2 785 LaShyra "Lash" Nolen @LashNolen 13h This left me with the following thoughts: 1. If stage 1 Lyme disease is taught to be recognized as a rash on white skin, how are we supposed to diagnose Lyme disease in our darker skinned patients? Does this mean Lyme disease will progress to later stages in these patients? 4/5 t 81 608 LaShyra "Lash" Nolen @LashN olen 13h 2. How does this later detection contritubute to the disparities we see in healthcare and what can we do in #med Ed to reduce these disparities and ensure students have the tools necessary to treat and diagnosis patients of all skin types equitably? 5/5 unfriendly-black-hijabi: wahtdahel: Most of the medical research was done on white males and their response to medicine. This is why medical books should only serve as a framework but clinical expertise matters more. And this is why we need more black doctors. Black people are more likely to die from skin cancer for the same reason. It’s just diagnosed later.

unfriendly-black-hijabi: wahtdahel: Most of the medical research was done on white males and their response to medicine. This is why me...

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val-ritz: dreaming-in-circles: magickinmundane: pr0dr0me: licensetomurse: meanwhileonwednesday: As a medical professional and a medically complicated human this is very important to me That’s not wrong. These are both true Both are very very true. These are both true, but more importantly, not mutually exclusive! Say a patient comes in with chest pain. First time they’ve ever had chest pain. They say they googled it, and clearly they have cancer now! …no. That’s the first example. But say a patient has chest pain, they’ve had chest pain for 10 years, every previous doctor has checked for all the obvious causes, and nothing changes. That’s a completely different scenario. In the first example, the patient doesn’t know what they’re talking about. The condition is new, their knowledge is limited. That’s why we have doctors. But in the second example, the patient is the expert, and the doctor is the one who’s new to the situation. The patient has done all this before, and is very familiar with the pain (condition, etc.) that they have. The doctor is not the one with 10 years of experience. They need to listen, because the patient actually has something they don’t know to add to the conversation. These two things are not mutually exclusive, they are not the same scenario, and both doctors and patients (but mostly doctors) need to learn to tell the difference and know when to talk, and when to listen. This is also *highly* relevant to anti-vaxers. There is a reason that the entire section on dysthymia in my psychology textbooks is basically “this person has been living with this for years longer than you will ever have researched it. help them facilitate their own coping strategies.” : Trisha Greenhalgh #FBPE @trishgreenhalgh Doctor: Don't confuse your Google search with my 6y at medical school. Patient: Don't confuse the 1-hour lecture you had on my condition with my 20y of living with it. 5:30 AM May 26, 2018 7.4K Retweets 22.8K Likes val-ritz: dreaming-in-circles: magickinmundane: pr0dr0me: licensetomurse: meanwhileonwednesday: As a medical professional and a medically complicated human this is very important to me That’s not wrong. These are both true Both are very very true. These are both true, but more importantly, not mutually exclusive! Say a patient comes in with chest pain. First time they’ve ever had chest pain. They say they googled it, and clearly they have cancer now! …no. That’s the first example. But say a patient has chest pain, they’ve had chest pain for 10 years, every previous doctor has checked for all the obvious causes, and nothing changes. That’s a completely different scenario. In the first example, the patient doesn’t know what they’re talking about. The condition is new, their knowledge is limited. That’s why we have doctors. But in the second example, the patient is the expert, and the doctor is the one who’s new to the situation. The patient has done all this before, and is very familiar with the pain (condition, etc.) that they have. The doctor is not the one with 10 years of experience. They need to listen, because the patient actually has something they don’t know to add to the conversation. These two things are not mutually exclusive, they are not the same scenario, and both doctors and patients (but mostly doctors) need to learn to tell the difference and know when to talk, and when to listen. This is also *highly* relevant to anti-vaxers. There is a reason that the entire section on dysthymia in my psychology textbooks is basically “this person has been living with this for years longer than you will ever have researched it. help them facilitate their own coping strategies.”

val-ritz: dreaming-in-circles: magickinmundane: pr0dr0me: licensetomurse: meanwhileonwednesday: As a medical professional and a me...

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