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crispy-ghee: There’s been a little bit of interest in Jagged-Tooth, Cousin’s first born son. A specific question was about his first meeting w/ Shepard, which I was gonna go on about, but I might make a comic about it later. So have a few sketches. Jagged-Tooth:  A rare Yautja Biotic, an elite Enforcer, and despite a rocky relationship w/ his father, he risked dishonor and punishment to join a faction of Yautja that went against the clan’s decision and went to aid Shepard. They meet when he arrives during the Battle for Palaven as surprise back up. Capable, dry, could be considered friendly…unless you’re Garrus.(When your dad’s ‘favorite son’ seems to be someone who isn’t even his fucking son, and who you think is a total dweeb, you’re not gonna be happy about that, I guess)He takes after his mother more than his father, though has his father’s intensity and skill, if only Cousin were more forthcoming w/ praise for that (he does recognize it, though he is very critical of his son and always being hard on him). Their relationship is that of an accomplished child with a father who has incredibly high expectations. That means that their relationship is very rocky. This started when he was young, as his path diverted early from Cousin’s hopes and plans for him. Not many Yautja are taught to develop their biotic abilities, and due to there being some contention over whether or not biotics are respectable in the Hunt tradition, the training is more often than not discouraged. But Jagged-Tooth went into training, and instead of becoming a traditional hunter, went down the line of enforcement. Cousin still hasn’t fully recovered from that disappointment. Joining the Yautja faction during the reaper war is the first time that Jagged-Tooth has ever had to operate under his father’s lead. He tries to be professional about it. Cousin, on the other hand, doesn’t try as hard to do the same. Someone described Jagged-Tooth as a “rare Yautja Bishounen” and you know what? Yes.: crispy-ghee: There’s been a little bit of interest in Jagged-Tooth, Cousin’s first born son. A specific question was about his first meeting w/ Shepard, which I was gonna go on about, but I might make a comic about it later. So have a few sketches. Jagged-Tooth:  A rare Yautja Biotic, an elite Enforcer, and despite a rocky relationship w/ his father, he risked dishonor and punishment to join a faction of Yautja that went against the clan’s decision and went to aid Shepard. They meet when he arrives during the Battle for Palaven as surprise back up. Capable, dry, could be considered friendly…unless you’re Garrus.(When your dad’s ‘favorite son’ seems to be someone who isn’t even his fucking son, and who you think is a total dweeb, you’re not gonna be happy about that, I guess)He takes after his mother more than his father, though has his father’s intensity and skill, if only Cousin were more forthcoming w/ praise for that (he does recognize it, though he is very critical of his son and always being hard on him). Their relationship is that of an accomplished child with a father who has incredibly high expectations. That means that their relationship is very rocky. This started when he was young, as his path diverted early from Cousin’s hopes and plans for him. Not many Yautja are taught to develop their biotic abilities, and due to there being some contention over whether or not biotics are respectable in the Hunt tradition, the training is more often than not discouraged. But Jagged-Tooth went into training, and instead of becoming a traditional hunter, went down the line of enforcement. Cousin still hasn’t fully recovered from that disappointment. Joining the Yautja faction during the reaper war is the first time that Jagged-Tooth has ever had to operate under his father’s lead. He tries to be professional about it. Cousin, on the other hand, doesn’t try as hard to do the same. Someone described Jagged-Tooth as a “rare Yautja Bishounen” and you know what? Yes.
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gahdamnpunk: “Rose, who is a transgender college student, said she had always wanted to work for Starbucks because of how they treat employees.” Corporations are not your friends and the police were indeed pigs. The fundraiser : Ari Drennen Follow @AriDrennen Remember the story about a Starbucks employee writing "pig" on a coffee order for police officers? The employee who did it was friends with the cops, but they complained later and got the trans woman who was her manager fired. DOGAD tem: 4 of 4 tems in order: 5 PIG It Hot Choc Fired Starbucks manager Lola Rose considering lawsuit over 'Pl... The Starbucks manager who was fired when a cop at her shop received an order labeled "PIG" is considering suing the coffee giant for making her. nypost.com 5:50 PM - 9 Dec 2019 from Washington, DC 12,231 Retweets 34,062 Likes Ari Drennen Follow @AriDrennen A lot of times transphobia isn't overt. It's not bigotry in your face. It's a shifting of expectations, a hyper focus on your other perceived faults, a sudden lack of tolerance for mistakes or room for understanding. Suddenly, you don't get the benefit of the doubt. 5:53 PM - 9 Dec 2019 from Washington, DC 687 Retweets 4,688 Likes Ari Drennen Follow @AriDrennen This blew up so I want to share what appears to be Lola's GoFundMe. Help her out if you can! DOGAP tem: 4 of 4 tems in order: 5 PIG t Hot Choc Click here to support Starbucks terminated me with no cause. or... Lola Rose Starbucks terminated me with no cause. My name is Lola Mae Rose I'm from Tulsa county Oklahoma and this is my story. ON NOVE. gofundme.com 9:48 AM - 10 Dec 2019 474 Retweets 1,472 Likes gahdamnpunk: “Rose, who is a transgender college student, said she had always wanted to work for Starbucks because of how they treat employees.” Corporations are not your friends and the police were indeed pigs. The fundraiser

gahdamnpunk: “Rose, who is a transgender college student, said she had always wanted to work for Starbucks because of how they treat e...

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allhailthegodofbugs: deadcatwithaflamethrower: star-anise: imfemalewarrior: imthegingerninja: nerdgul: gayonthemoon1239: rifa: actualbloggerwangyao: alvaroandtheworld: ultrafacts: Source  THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too. And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards. So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3 !!!!! NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT! This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!” All the Japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any Japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men) Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.    so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase Kawaii is so goth Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace I did not know this but I love this form of feminism!  -FemaleWarrior, She/They  Which is why you get bands like BABYMETAL, which toured with Judas Priest for a while, looking like this: Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace : In the 1970s, Japanese teenage girls developed such excessively cute handwriting that it was banned in schools due to illegibility. なおちゃん ·かようびに ks) (GK34リ Ultrafacts,.tumblr.com allhailthegodofbugs: deadcatwithaflamethrower: star-anise: imfemalewarrior: imthegingerninja: nerdgul: gayonthemoon1239: rifa: actualbloggerwangyao: alvaroandtheworld: ultrafacts: Source  THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too. And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards. So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3 !!!!! NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT! This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!” All the Japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any Japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men) Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.    so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase Kawaii is so goth Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace I did not know this but I love this form of feminism!  -FemaleWarrior, She/They  Which is why you get bands like BABYMETAL, which toured with Judas Priest for a while, looking like this: Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace

allhailthegodofbugs: deadcatwithaflamethrower: star-anise: imfemalewarrior: imthegingerninja: nerdgul: gayonthemoon1239: rifa: act...

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Here you go: Hey guys, I've been seeing these memes where muscular men at laptops explain elementary concepts in some topic or other to a nerdy-looking, curious kid. They really make me laugh, but I can't quite put my finger on why. It's not like there's any real jokes in there or anything First of all, I think this format makes excellent use of a comedic technique called incongruity, whereby viewers' preconceived notions are upended by unexpected juxtapositions. In this case, many people don't think of musclebound, traditionally masculine men as kind, intelligent and eager to advise. While not a joke in any conventional sense, this produces a humorous effect King, I want to echo what you're saying and also suggest that there's an even broader employment of incongruity here.. Viewers expect earnest requests for basic information to be met with vitriol due to a sense that discourse on web forums is generally noxious. The conviviality of the buff men's responses runs totally counter to viewer's expectations. It's not just muscular men that we presume to be hotheaded and condescending this kind of unacceptable behavior is endemic to the medium as a whole, and viewers are tickled to see that dynamic inverted. I really think Chief hit on something with that last response, and I want to add that part of the appeal of the format lies in its warmth those of us who spend a lot of time online find ourselves bathing in a sea of toxic discourse but, for a cohort so frequently described as overwhelmingly self-absorbed, I think that the millennials making and consuming these genuinely value humility a lack of ego and self-importance and empathy the ability to understand others. The men in these memes display these in spades and, through the experience of incogruity, viewers are given theopportunity to deepen their own humility and extend their sense of empathy. Here you go

Here you go

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