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<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/157196580399/black-history-month-day-13-entrepreneur-and" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Black history month day 13: Entrepreneur and social activist Madame CJ Walker.</p> <p>Madame CJ Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana in 1867. Her parents and siblings had been former slaves but she was the first in her family to be born free post-emancipation. She was orphaned at the age of 7, and when she was 10, Sarah moved to Mississippi to live with her older sister and brother-in-law, and work as a domestic servant. She married at 14, possibly to escape mistreatment from her brother-the-law. She had one child with her first husband Moses before he passed away. She remarried, but ended up leaving her husband to move to Denver Colorado. Finally in 1906, Sarah married Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaper advertising salesman she had known in Missouri. Through this marriage, she became known as Madam C. J. Walker. </p> <p>Sarah moved to St. Louis Missouri with her daughter and got work as a laundress, barely earning a dollar a day. Still, she was determined to make enough money to afford her daughter a formal education. During this time, Walker experienced hair and scalp problems that were common among black women of her era, including severe dandruff and baldness due to skin disorders and the application of harsh products such as lye that were included in soaps to cleanse hair. Other contributing factors included poor diet, illnesses, and infrequent bathing and hair washing. This was a time when many Americans lacked indoor plumbing, central heating, and electricity. Walker ended up becoming a commission sales agent for Annie Turnbo Malone, another black hair care entrepreneur, and ended up adapting her knowledge of hair to develop her own product line. Eventually she became the biggest rival of the company she once worked for.</p> <p>Walker began a business selling hair care products for African-American women. She worked with her husband as a business partner and her daughter as a sales associate. She adopted the name “madam” from the women pioneers of the French beauty industry, and trained many other black women on proper hair care and how to sell her products. She gave jobs to thousands of women and the majority of her salesforce and management was female run. She gained international popularity with women using her products in places like Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba. </p> <p>Walker passed away at age 51 from kidney failure and complications with hypertension, and her daughter became president of the company. Walker was eulogized first self-made American millionaire, although her estate was only worth about $600,000. However that’s close to $8 million in today’s money. Walker gave generously to charity and spent much of her life teaching other black women how to budget their money and start their own businesses.</p></blockquote> <p>Friendly reminder that capitalism helps POC advance more than virtue signaling on Tumblr ever could.</p>: WALRER SCAL İNTMENT WONDERFUENT UBLE STRENGT PRICE S0 CENT <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/157196580399/black-history-month-day-13-entrepreneur-and" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Black history month day 13: Entrepreneur and social activist Madame CJ Walker.</p> <p>Madame CJ Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana in 1867. Her parents and siblings had been former slaves but she was the first in her family to be born free post-emancipation. She was orphaned at the age of 7, and when she was 10, Sarah moved to Mississippi to live with her older sister and brother-in-law, and work as a domestic servant. She married at 14, possibly to escape mistreatment from her brother-the-law. She had one child with her first husband Moses before he passed away. She remarried, but ended up leaving her husband to move to Denver Colorado. Finally in 1906, Sarah married Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaper advertising salesman she had known in Missouri. Through this marriage, she became known as Madam C. J. Walker. </p> <p>Sarah moved to St. Louis Missouri with her daughter and got work as a laundress, barely earning a dollar a day. Still, she was determined to make enough money to afford her daughter a formal education. During this time, Walker experienced hair and scalp problems that were common among black women of her era, including severe dandruff and baldness due to skin disorders and the application of harsh products such as lye that were included in soaps to cleanse hair. Other contributing factors included poor diet, illnesses, and infrequent bathing and hair washing. This was a time when many Americans lacked indoor plumbing, central heating, and electricity. Walker ended up becoming a commission sales agent for Annie Turnbo Malone, another black hair care entrepreneur, and ended up adapting her knowledge of hair to develop her own product line. Eventually she became the biggest rival of the company she once worked for.</p> <p>Walker began a business selling hair care products for African-American women. She worked with her husband as a business partner and her daughter as a sales associate. She adopted the name “madam” from the women pioneers of the French beauty industry, and trained many other black women on proper hair care and how to sell her products. She gave jobs to thousands of women and the majority of her salesforce and management was female run. She gained international popularity with women using her products in places like Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba. </p> <p>Walker passed away at age 51 from kidney failure and complications with hypertension, and her daughter became president of the company. Walker was eulogized first self-made American millionaire, although her estate was only worth about $600,000. However that’s close to $8 million in today’s money. Walker gave generously to charity and spent much of her life teaching other black women how to budget their money and start their own businesses.</p></blockquote> <p>Friendly reminder that capitalism helps POC advance more than virtue signaling on Tumblr ever could.</p>

<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/157196580399/black-history-month-day-13-entrepreneur-and" class="tumblr_blog">libertari...

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<p>Black history month day 18: poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou.</p> <p>Maya Angelou was born Marguerite Annie Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. When she was three years old, her parents ended their marriage and she and her brother were sent to live with her paternal grandmother who, contrary to most African-Americans at the time, was fairly wealthy due to her ownership of a general store and wise investments.</p> <p>Maya’s father returned them to their mother’s care when she was seven. At the age of eight, she was sexually abused and raped by her mother’s boyfriend at the time. The man was found guilty but only served a one day jail sentence. Later he was murdered, most likely by Maya’s uncles. The trauma of all this caused Maya to become mute for almost five years. In her words, “I thought, my voice killed him; I killed that man, because I told his name. And then I thought I would never speak again, because my voice would kill anyone.”</p> <p>During this period of muteness, Maya developed her excellent memory and love of books. A teacher later introduced her to many great poets and writers such as Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Francis Harper. She credits this teacher with helping her regain her ability to speak.</p> <p>Angelou held many jobs throughout her life, including jobs in the sex industry as a prostitute, exotic dancer, and Madame. She believed it was important to share these experiences because she felt that too often the older generation would hide their skeletons and pretend they had done nothing wrong, leaving the younger people no experiences to learn from. She outlined her work in the sex industry in her book “Gather Together in My Name”.</p> <p>She published seven autobiographies, including the one she is probably best known for “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”. She also wrote three books of essays, several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years. She received dozens of awards and more than 50 honorary degrees.</p>: <p>Black history month day 18: poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou.</p> <p>Maya Angelou was born Marguerite Annie Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. When she was three years old, her parents ended their marriage and she and her brother were sent to live with her paternal grandmother who, contrary to most African-Americans at the time, was fairly wealthy due to her ownership of a general store and wise investments.</p> <p>Maya’s father returned them to their mother’s care when she was seven. At the age of eight, she was sexually abused and raped by her mother’s boyfriend at the time. The man was found guilty but only served a one day jail sentence. Later he was murdered, most likely by Maya’s uncles. The trauma of all this caused Maya to become mute for almost five years. In her words, “I thought, my voice killed him; I killed that man, because I told his name. And then I thought I would never speak again, because my voice would kill anyone.”</p> <p>During this period of muteness, Maya developed her excellent memory and love of books. A teacher later introduced her to many great poets and writers such as Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Francis Harper. She credits this teacher with helping her regain her ability to speak.</p> <p>Angelou held many jobs throughout her life, including jobs in the sex industry as a prostitute, exotic dancer, and Madame. She believed it was important to share these experiences because she felt that too often the older generation would hide their skeletons and pretend they had done nothing wrong, leaving the younger people no experiences to learn from. She outlined her work in the sex industry in her book “Gather Together in My Name”.</p> <p>She published seven autobiographies, including the one she is probably best known for “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”. She also wrote three books of essays, several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years. She received dozens of awards and more than 50 honorary degrees.</p>

<p>Black history month day 18: poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou.</p> <p>Maya Angelou was born Marguerite Annie Johnson on Apr...

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<p>Black history month day 13: Entrepreneur and social activist Madame CJ Walker.</p> <p>Madame CJ Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana in 1867. Her parents and siblings had been former slaves but she was the first in her family to be born free post-emancipation. She was orphaned at the age of 7, and when she was 10, Sarah moved to Mississippi to live with her older sister and brother-in-law, and work as a domestic servant. She married at 14, possibly to escape mistreatment from her brother-the-law. She had one child with her first husband Moses before he passed away. She remarried, but ended up leaving her husband to move to Denver Colorado. Finally in 1906, Sarah married Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaper advertising salesman she had known in Missouri. Through this marriage, she became known as Madam C. J. Walker. </p> <p>Sarah moved to St. Louis Missouri with her daughter and got work as a laundress, barely earning a dollar a day. Still, she was determined to make enough money to afford her daughter a formal education. During this time, Walker experienced hair and scalp problems that were common among black women of her era, including severe dandruff and baldness due to skin disorders and the application of harsh products such as lye that were included in soaps to cleanse hair. Other contributing factors included poor diet, illnesses, and infrequent bathing and hair washing. This was a time when many Americans lacked indoor plumbing, central heating, and electricity. Walker ended up becoming a commission sales agent for Annie Turnbo Malone, another black hair care entrepreneur, and ended up adapting her knowledge of hair to develop her own product line. Eventually she became the biggest rival of the company she once worked for.</p> <p>Walker began a business selling hair care products for African-American women. She worked with her husband as a business partner and her daughter as a sales associate. She adopted the name “madam” from the women pioneers of the French beauty industry, and trained many other black women on proper hair care and how to sell her products. She gave jobs to thousands of women and the majority of her salesforce and management was female run. She gained international popularity with women using her products in places like Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba. </p> <p>Walker passed away at age 51 from kidney failure and complications with hypertension, and her daughter became president of the company. Walker was eulogized first self-made American millionaire, although her estate was only worth about $600,000. However that’s close to $8 million in today’s money. Walker gave generously to charity and spent much of her life teaching other black women how to budget their money and start their own businesses.</p>: WALRER SCAL İNTMENT WONDERFUENT UBLE STRENGT PRICE S0 CENT <p>Black history month day 13: Entrepreneur and social activist Madame CJ Walker.</p> <p>Madame CJ Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana in 1867. Her parents and siblings had been former slaves but she was the first in her family to be born free post-emancipation. She was orphaned at the age of 7, and when she was 10, Sarah moved to Mississippi to live with her older sister and brother-in-law, and work as a domestic servant. She married at 14, possibly to escape mistreatment from her brother-the-law. She had one child with her first husband Moses before he passed away. She remarried, but ended up leaving her husband to move to Denver Colorado. Finally in 1906, Sarah married Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaper advertising salesman she had known in Missouri. Through this marriage, she became known as Madam C. J. Walker. </p> <p>Sarah moved to St. Louis Missouri with her daughter and got work as a laundress, barely earning a dollar a day. Still, she was determined to make enough money to afford her daughter a formal education. During this time, Walker experienced hair and scalp problems that were common among black women of her era, including severe dandruff and baldness due to skin disorders and the application of harsh products such as lye that were included in soaps to cleanse hair. Other contributing factors included poor diet, illnesses, and infrequent bathing and hair washing. This was a time when many Americans lacked indoor plumbing, central heating, and electricity. Walker ended up becoming a commission sales agent for Annie Turnbo Malone, another black hair care entrepreneur, and ended up adapting her knowledge of hair to develop her own product line. Eventually she became the biggest rival of the company she once worked for.</p> <p>Walker began a business selling hair care products for African-American women. She worked with her husband as a business partner and her daughter as a sales associate. She adopted the name “madam” from the women pioneers of the French beauty industry, and trained many other black women on proper hair care and how to sell her products. She gave jobs to thousands of women and the majority of her salesforce and management was female run. She gained international popularity with women using her products in places like Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba. </p> <p>Walker passed away at age 51 from kidney failure and complications with hypertension, and her daughter became president of the company. Walker was eulogized first self-made American millionaire, although her estate was only worth about $600,000. However that’s close to $8 million in today’s money. Walker gave generously to charity and spent much of her life teaching other black women how to budget their money and start their own businesses.</p>

<p>Black history month day 13: Entrepreneur and social activist Madame CJ Walker.</p> <p>Madame CJ Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in L...

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<p><a href="http://thecivilwarparlor.tumblr.com/post/38227647415/cathay-williams-became-the-first-and-the-only" class="tumblr_blog">thecivilwarparlor</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><strong>Cathay Williams -</strong> <strong>B</strong><strong>ecame the first and the only known female Buffalo Soldier. Enlisting in the US Regular Army 1866 at St. Louis, Missouri for a three year engagement, passing herself off as a man.</strong></p> <p>She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay.</p> <p> Williams travelled with the 8th Indiana, accompanying the soldiers on their marches through Arkansas, Louisiana, and Georgia. She was present at the Battle of Pea Ridge and the Red River Campaign. At one time she was transferred to Little Rock, where she would have seen uniformed African-American men serving as soldiers, which may have inspired her own interest in military service. Later, Williams was transferred to Washington, D.C., where she served with General Philip Sheridan’s command. When the war ended, Williams was working at Jefferson Barracks.</p> <p>The exact date of Williams’ death is unknown, but it is assumed she died shortly after being denied a pension, probably sometime in 1892. Her simple grave marker would have been made of wood and deteriorated long ago. Thus her final resting place is now unknown.</p></blockquote>: FEMALE BUFFALO SOLDIER 1 1 THE UNTOLD STORY Cathay Williams/William Cathay "Not Folklore Masquerading As History" <p><a href="http://thecivilwarparlor.tumblr.com/post/38227647415/cathay-williams-became-the-first-and-the-only" class="tumblr_blog">thecivilwarparlor</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><strong>Cathay Williams -</strong> <strong>B</strong><strong>ecame the first and the only known female Buffalo Soldier. Enlisting in the US Regular Army 1866 at St. Louis, Missouri for a three year engagement, passing herself off as a man.</strong></p> <p>She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay.</p> <p> Williams travelled with the 8th Indiana, accompanying the soldiers on their marches through Arkansas, Louisiana, and Georgia. She was present at the Battle of Pea Ridge and the Red River Campaign. At one time she was transferred to Little Rock, where she would have seen uniformed African-American men serving as soldiers, which may have inspired her own interest in military service. Later, Williams was transferred to Washington, D.C., where she served with General Philip Sheridan’s command. When the war ended, Williams was working at Jefferson Barracks.</p> <p>The exact date of Williams’ death is unknown, but it is assumed she died shortly after being denied a pension, probably sometime in 1892. Her simple grave marker would have been made of wood and deteriorated long ago. Thus her final resting place is now unknown.</p></blockquote>

<p><a href="http://thecivilwarparlor.tumblr.com/post/38227647415/cathay-williams-became-the-first-and-the-only" class="tumblr_blog">theci...

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