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Bailey Jay, Complex, and Crazy: lebanon-hangover: partlysmith: gelunnucifera: callan-the-misandrist: positive-press-daily: This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x] NEAT YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious. The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground. Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light. At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above). And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.) solar punk sensibilities with cyber punk aesthetic Swamplamp

lebanon-hangover: partlysmith: gelunnucifera: callan-the-misandrist: positive-press-daily: This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a ...

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Memes, Phenomenal, and Spider: HOUSE PLANTS THAT DETOXIFY AND FRESHEN THE AIR IN YOUR HOME IG:OCONSCIOUSVIBRANCcY DY ALOE ARECA P SPIDER PLANT GOLDEN POTHOS Plants are an attractive addition to any home. But dig a little deeper beneath their beauty and you’ll discover that the benefits of interior landscaping go far beyond the aesthetic. Most of us know instinctively that being close to greenery makes us feel more at ease with our surroundings. We experience less stress when there are plants around us. Buildings are quieter and more relaxed but, at the same time, more stimulating and interesting. A substantial body of academic research, has shown conclusively that interior landscaping has dramatic effects on the wellbeing of building occupants. When you breathe, your body takes in oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Adding plants to interior spaces can increase oxygen levels. Lady Palm: Best houseplant (requiring less maintenance) to resist pests at home. Aloe: This sun-loving houseplant will help clear common VOC’s like formaldehyde and benzene. Areca Palm: An adorable option to decorate your home, however, also highly effective to get rid of airborne toxins. Spider Plant: A great air purifier that fights off VOC’s, carbon monoxide, and xylene, which incorporates chemically-related hydrocarbons used by leather, rubber, and printing firms. It’s also safe for pets at home. Peace Lily: It eliminates alcohol, acetone, trichloroethylene, benzene, and formaldehyde from indoor air, and evokes a romantic feeling in your room. Golden Pothos: Consider it also as a phenomenal option to plant outdoors, maybe your garage, because it can battle formaldehyde which is a major content of car exhaust. Rubber Plant: It specifically removes the presence of formaldehyde from indoor air. Janet Craig: As cool as it sounds, this houseplant will help ease off your indoor air by eliminating trichloroethylene. It is another low maintenance option with attractive features. Disclaimer: if you have pets at home be sure to check if each plant is pet friendly. Consciousvibrancy

Plants are an attractive addition to any home. But dig a little deeper beneath their beauty and you’ll discover that the benefits of interio...

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Beautiful, Family, and Life: We are fostering Shay Nieves (aka Dorito) while she is looking for her forever home. She is a very sweet tiny senior dog. She is only 11lb and 8yr old. She came into our life through @susiesseniordogs and @fosterdogsnyc. @animalhaven is accepting applications for her adoption. Her owner got very sick and couldn't take care of her anymore. When she arrived at the shelter her hair was matted but thankfully she got a nice makeover! Her fur is beautiful and very soft now. Besides that, you can tell she was well treated in her previous life. She is very sweet, loooooooves to cuddle and be pet. She is friendly, well behaved, fast learner and good listener. She always follow people around is ridiculously low maintenance. We hope she finds a great family that gives her all the love she deserves. If you want to adopt her please email @animalhaven at dogsandcats@ah-nyc.org ❤️🏠 FamousFosters ........................... Tenemos a Shay Nieves (para nosotros Dorito) de acogida mientras busca una familia que la adopte permanentemente. Es una perrita minúscula y muy dulce. Pesa casi 5kg y tiene 8 años. Nos llegó a través de @susiesseniordogs y @fosterdogsnyc @animalhaven está aceptando solicitudes para su adopción. Su antiguo "dueño" se puso muy enfermo y no la podía cuidar más. Llegó a la protectora con muchos nudos en el pelo pero por suerte le hicieron un cambio de look! Ahora tiene el pelo muy bonito y suave. A parte de eso se puede ver que la trataron bien. Le encantan los mimos, siempre nos sigue a todas partes. Es super cariñosa y se porta muy bien. Aprende muy rápido, responde y está bien enseñada. Es exageradamente fácil de cuidar, necesita bien poco. Esperamos encontrarle una familia que le dé todo el amor que se merece. Si estás interesad@ en adoptarla por favor envía un email a @animalhaven a dogsandcats@ah-nyc.org ❤️🏠

We are fostering Shay Nieves (aka Dorito) while she is looking for her forever home. She is a very sweet tiny senior dog. She is only 11lb a...

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Animals, Beautiful, and Community: A plan to turn Hiawatha Golif Course into Minneapolis' first food forest Tuesday, March 14, 2017 by Taylor Danz in Food & Drink Wikipedia The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. nativenews: baapi-makwa: http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416059773 this is awesome 😊 The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. Imagine a forest filled with edible plants, berries, hazelnuts, and maple trees, bordered by hiking trails. A place where you can learn to forage and harvest while enjoying a beautiful lake and natural wetlands. Now imagine that the forest is located on the edge of Minneapolis. This is what Ryan Seibold and Russ Henry are trying to create near Lake Hiawatha. Parts of the nearby Hiawatha Golf Course have been closed since a 2014 flood, and are expected to reopen this spring. This spurred the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board to explore options for rebuilding the course to make it more flood resistant. Yet these plans stalled when it was discovered that the board was pumping more groundwater from the course – and into the already-polluted Lake Hiawatha – than allowed by the state. The city was left to decide whether to keep pumping or let the former wetland reclaim its territory. Henry, a landscape designer who is running for a Park Board seat, says replacing the course with a food forest would turn a big problem into a big benefit. The restored wetland would act as a natural filter, blocking major pollutants from storm water sewers and bringing back animals and plants displaced by the course, he says. Put simply, a food forest is a woodland that uses native trees, shrubs, and plants that are both edible and medicinal. The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. Intended to be low-maintenance and self-maintaining once established, the plants are designed to not only build soil but to attract pollinators. (Plants like milkweed are especially beneficial for bees and monarch butterflies.) According to Seibold, the plants would be available for people to forage and harvest as needed. The idea is to teach people to understand the connection between plants and animals, as well as learn when to harvest sustainably. “You’re growing the food, but you’re also growing the community around the food,” Seibold says. There would have to be some sort of foraging training to ensure the plants are available for everyone, Henry adds. When he got his first job in a nursery 20 years ago, Henry says plants were just green things he couldn’t begin to tell apart. Since then, nature has opened up to him, and he would love for the kids of Minneapolis to have the same opportunity. By learning more about what they’re able to take from nature, Henry says that people might feel more empowered to grow food in their own yards, to embrace nature and sustainable development, and to encourage friends and neighbors to do the same. Seibold and Henry say they’ve been getting positive feedback. The park board has until July to decide what to do with the land, but Henry says it may have already decided to reconstruct the golf course. Either way, the men will continue their work. Seibold is working with the board to establish a fruit and nut tree orchard on the east side of the lake, and Henry is helping to coordinate a food innovation lab on March 16 in the Food Building in northeast Minneapolis. The event will showcase ideas for ensuring better soil and water quality, as well as new harvesting techniques and agro projects.

nativenews: baapi-makwa: http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416059...

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