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Julius Caesar was a total slut.: sathinfection contemporary roman writers slutshamed julius caesar that's your ides of march fact for today what an absolute unit ol' iulius was liesmyth how could you write this and not say WHY he was getting slutshamed julius husband to all wives and wife to all husbands caesar was a thirsty, thirsty bottom sathinfection suetonius: i heard that caesar was a big slut and also he liked buttsex and oral liesmyth cicero, to the gathered senate: CAESAR TAKES IT UP THE ASS for historical context, cicero publicly called out jc for bottoming for king nicomedes of bithynia. they first met when caesar was 20, the king was at least twice his age. -am-net saying -sugar daddy-but sugar daddy-the sex was so good that when nicomede:s died he left his entire kingdom to rome, i am not making this up this is true langernameohnebedeutung listen it's one thing to slut shame Caesar, but Cicero went around speculating in public about Caesan and the king doing it on a "golden couch arrayed in purple" where "the virginity of the one sprung fronm Venus was lost in Bithynia" so I don't think good old lulius is the only one who's got to ask himself some serious questions here. spaffy-jimble Julius Caesar was stabbed for being a bottom please share for bottom's rights beware-the-ravenstag fun fact-there was a popular song/chant his soldiers would sing so where ever they marched they could announce it to the whole world silver-tongues-blog Julius Caesar has been dead for 2062 slutty years Source: sathinfection Julius Caesar was a total slut.
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20 Inspirational Quotes for Educators #quotes #teachers: 20 Inspirational Quotes Educators 1. "We are what we believe we are." C.S. Lewis 2. "Children are like wet cement, whatever falls on them makes an impression." Haim Ginott 3. "Every child should have a caring adult in their lives. And that's not always a biological parent or family member. It may be a friend or neighbor. Often times it is a teacher." Joe Manchin 4. "Failure is the opportunity to begin again, more intelligently. Henry Ford 5. "Good teaching is more a giving of right questions than a giving of right answers." Josef Albers 6. If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader." President John Quincy Adams 7. "If you are planning for a year, sow rice; if you are planning for a decade, plant trees, if you are planning for a lifetime, educate people." Chinese Proverb 8. "The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery Mark van Doren 9. The job of an educator is to teach students to see the vitality in themselves," Joseph Campbell 10. "Ive learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." Maya Angelou 11. 'Most of us end up with no more than five or six people who remember us. Teachers have thousands of people who remem ber them for the rest of their lives. Andy Rooney 12. "The greatest sign of success for a teacher ...is to be able to say. The children are now working as if I did not exist Maria Montessori 13. "If a child can't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn." Ignacio 'Nacho' Estrada 14. "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid Anonymous 15. 'One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child Carl Jung 16. "Good teachers know how to bring out the best in students." Charles Kuralt 17. "The most valuable resource that all teachers have is each other. Without collaboration our growth is limited to our own perspectives." Robert John Meehan 18. The dream begins, most of the time, with a teacher who believes in you, who tugs and pushes and leads you on to the next plateau, sometimes poking you with a sharp stick called truth." Dan Rather 19. 'Anyone who does anything to help a child in his life is a hero to me." Fred Rogers 20. "What nobler employment, or more valuable to the state than that of the man who instructs the rising generation." Marcus Tullius Cicero 20 Inspirational Quotes for Educators #quotes #teachers

20 Inspirational Quotes for Educators #quotes #teachers

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<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://agentsama.tumblr.com/post/107299905099/slvrnightx-ultrafacts-aussietory">agentsama</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://slvrnightx.tumblr.com/post/97271985185/ultrafacts-aussietory">slvrnightx</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/97269070131/aussietory-third-way-is-best-way">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://aussietory.tumblr.com/post/97037485207/third-way-is-best-way-tuxedoandex">aussietory</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://third-way-is-best-way.tumblr.com/post/97026410042/tuxedoandex-kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts">third-way-is-best-way</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://tuxedoandex.tumblr.com/post/97009990157/kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts-source-for-more">tuxedoandex</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kvotheunkvothe.tumblr.com/post/91996111874/ultrafacts-source-for-more-facts-follow">kvotheunkvothe</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/91744814059/source-for-more-facts-follow-ultrafacts">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria#Destruction_of_the_Library">Source</a> <strong>For more facts <a href="http://ultrafacts.tumblr.com/">follow Ultrafacts</a></strong></p> </blockquote> <p>EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET <strong>SO ANGRY</strong>.</p> </blockquote> <p>but why</p> </blockquote> <p>Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.</p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="" src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkdeee4gtd1qd4jgjo1_500.jpg"/></p> </blockquote> <p>The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, &amp; important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.</p> </blockquote> <p>I get so sad whenever I think about this.</p> </blockquote> <p>Good God Almighty, not this “Christians ruined knowledge 4ever” bullhockey again. I am <em><strong>so</strong> </em>tired of this overused narrative.</p> <p>Firstly, the destruction of the Library has not been attributed to a specific event. The Library had been in decline years before Jesus was even born. Multiple Roman scholars, including <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14140/14140-h/14140-h.htm#LIFE_OF_C_CAESAR">Plutarch</a> (XLIX.435), <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Roman_History/Book_XXII#XVI">Ammianus Marcellinus</a>, <a href="http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:2007.01.0072:id=v2.p.139">Aulus Gellius</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Of_Peace_of_Mind#IX.">Seneca</a>, record the destruction of books in Alexandria, all placing the events before Christians even existed (Plutarch and Ammian specifically attribute the burning of the Library to Julius Caesar burning his ships in his siege of Alexandria, while Aulus Gellius adds an earlier removal of books by the Persians). Ammian especially hints to the faded glory of Alexandria’s libraries, especially the Serapeum (which also functioned as a temple to the Graeco-Egyptian god Serapis). Further historians attribute the destruction of the library to the ruin of <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=WR9bsvhc4XMC&amp;pg=PA20&amp;lpg=PA20&amp;dq=Brucheion+aurelian&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=idw91tlzf4&amp;sig=bVBajSGaeEQJzGAo8mJZt7uI5c4&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=IoGrVM-LNISlNuzGgLgK&amp;ved=0CCwQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Brucheion%20aurelian&amp;f=false">Brucheion</a> (the location of the Library) Aurelian’s war against the Palmyrene Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century.</p> <p>Two more events are often mentioned as the destruction of the Library. The first is the <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Nicene_and_Post-Nicene_Fathers:_Series_II/Volume_II/Socrates/Book_V/Chapter_16">complete destruction of the Serapeum</a> by Coptic Pope Theophilus in 391 AD, as part of his decree to destroy all the pagan temples of the city. The ecclesiastical historian Socrates of Constantinople gives no mention of the books, while lesser-known Christian historian Paulus Orosius (VI.263) <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=O3tJ9mFnwpQC&amp;pg=PA228&amp;source=gbs_toc_r&amp;cad=3#v=snippet&amp;q=book%20chests&amp;f=false">notes</a> that the books burned (of which he laments) were not the same as the original collection of the Library. The other event is the Caliphate’s invasion of Egypt in 642 AD. The destruction of the Library is dubiously recorded by <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/10/abd-al-latifs-account-of-egypt-and-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Abd al-Latif al Baghdadi</a> and <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/24/al-qifti-on-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Ibn al-Qifti</a>, who both claim that ‘Amr ibn al-‘As destroyed the Library by the orders of Caliph Umar. So many burnings, but not one has been definitively set as <em>the </em>destruction of the Library.</p> <p>But enough about the Library. The problem is this false idea of Christianity (especially Catholicism, since we all know that’s the Church attacked for the so-called “Dark Ages”) being absolutely opposed to scholarly and scientific knowledge. One need only read <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3002.htm#article4">Aquinas</a> and <a href="http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_15101998_fides-et-ratio_en.html">John Paul II</a> to see that the tradition of the Church has been <em>fides et ratio</em>, faith and reason, that science and religion are not enemies and should not be viewed as such. Much knowledge was lost in the drawn-out destruction of the Library of Alexandria, but Christianity also preserved much knowledge. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_Library_of_Constantinople">The Imperial Library of Constantinople</a> housed a large collection of Roman and Greek works, begun at the behest of Christian Emperor Constantius II in the 4th Century. Socrates and Plato were vastly influential on the thought of Augustine and Boethius. Many of the Church Fathers, even after Saint Augustine, as well as various authors and poets throughout the Middle Ages, knew well the works of Vergil, Cicero, Sallust, Horace, and Seneca the Younger. Saint Isidore of Seville, bishop and Doctor of the Church, sought to compile and preserve a summary of a large majority of the knowledge of Western antiquity, known as the <em><a href="http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=3ep502syZv8C">Etymologiae</a></em>. The medievals still studied the writings of <a href="http://historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2749">Euclid</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_of_Cremona#Gerard.27s_translations">Archimedes</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eugenius_of_Palermo&amp;redirect=no">Ptolemy</a>. Modern civil law has its roots in the <em>Corpus Juris Civilis </em>(“The Body of Civil Law”), the collection of Roman jurisprudence compiled by the Byzantine Christian Emperor Justinian. Still more Christian writers such as <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08459b.htm">Saint John Damascene</a> and <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01276a.htm">Alcuin of York</a> preserved classical learning and expanded the fields of philosophy and theology.</p> <p>The chart especially ignores the contributions to learning made by Western European Christians (i.e. Catholics) throughout the Middle Ages, including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_Renaissance">Carolingian Renaissance</a> and especially the advances of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Middle_Ages">High Middle Ages</a>. These include the renaissance of architecture (namely the “Gothic” style of the 12th Century), the reinterpretation of Aristotelian learning (especially in terms of renewed interest in dialectics and syllogistic logic) by the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13548a.htm">Scholastics</a>, and the foundations of the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15188a.htm">modern university system</a> (the development of which was <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrasa#Madrasa_and_university">independent of the Islamic <em>madrasa</em></a>), with the oldest in continual use being the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02641b.htm">University of Bologna</a> (since the 11th Century).</p> <p>The chart, and by extension the general sentiment, is also <em>incredibly </em>Eurocentric (in a demeaning way) and <em>vastly</em> oblivious to the advances of other peoples throughout the world, including the Islamic Caliphate, the Tang, Song, and Yuan dynasties in China, and Late Classical India. Many of those civilizations did not suffer such a loss of learning as perceived in Western Europe. The entire idea is distasteful and ignorant.</p> </blockquote> <p>FYI.</p>: In ancient Egypt, any books found in ships coming into port, would be brought immediately to the library of Alexandria and be copied. The original would be kept in the library and the copy given back to the owner. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://agentsama.tumblr.com/post/107299905099/slvrnightx-ultrafacts-aussietory">agentsama</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://slvrnightx.tumblr.com/post/97271985185/ultrafacts-aussietory">slvrnightx</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/97269070131/aussietory-third-way-is-best-way">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://aussietory.tumblr.com/post/97037485207/third-way-is-best-way-tuxedoandex">aussietory</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://third-way-is-best-way.tumblr.com/post/97026410042/tuxedoandex-kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts">third-way-is-best-way</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://tuxedoandex.tumblr.com/post/97009990157/kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts-source-for-more">tuxedoandex</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kvotheunkvothe.tumblr.com/post/91996111874/ultrafacts-source-for-more-facts-follow">kvotheunkvothe</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/91744814059/source-for-more-facts-follow-ultrafacts">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria#Destruction_of_the_Library">Source</a> <strong>For more facts <a href="http://ultrafacts.tumblr.com/">follow Ultrafacts</a></strong></p> </blockquote> <p>EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET <strong>SO ANGRY</strong>.</p> </blockquote> <p>but why</p> </blockquote> <p>Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.</p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="" src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkdeee4gtd1qd4jgjo1_500.jpg"/></p> </blockquote> <p>The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, &amp; important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.</p> </blockquote> <p>I get so sad whenever I think about this.</p> </blockquote> <p>Good God Almighty, not this “Christians ruined knowledge 4ever” bullhockey again. I am <em><strong>so</strong> </em>tired of this overused narrative.</p> <p>Firstly, the destruction of the Library has not been attributed to a specific event. The Library had been in decline years before Jesus was even born. Multiple Roman scholars, including <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14140/14140-h/14140-h.htm#LIFE_OF_C_CAESAR">Plutarch</a> (XLIX.435), <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Roman_History/Book_XXII#XVI">Ammianus Marcellinus</a>, <a href="http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:2007.01.0072:id=v2.p.139">Aulus Gellius</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Of_Peace_of_Mind#IX.">Seneca</a>, record the destruction of books in Alexandria, all placing the events before Christians even existed (Plutarch and Ammian specifically attribute the burning of the Library to Julius Caesar burning his ships in his siege of Alexandria, while Aulus Gellius adds an earlier removal of books by the Persians). Ammian especially hints to the faded glory of Alexandria’s libraries, especially the Serapeum (which also functioned as a temple to the Graeco-Egyptian god Serapis). Further historians attribute the destruction of the library to the ruin of <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=WR9bsvhc4XMC&amp;pg=PA20&amp;lpg=PA20&amp;dq=Brucheion+aurelian&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=idw91tlzf4&amp;sig=bVBajSGaeEQJzGAo8mJZt7uI5c4&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=IoGrVM-LNISlNuzGgLgK&amp;ved=0CCwQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Brucheion%20aurelian&amp;f=false">Brucheion</a> (the location of the Library) Aurelian’s war against the Palmyrene Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century.</p> <p>Two more events are often mentioned as the destruction of the Library. The first is the <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Nicene_and_Post-Nicene_Fathers:_Series_II/Volume_II/Socrates/Book_V/Chapter_16">complete destruction of the Serapeum</a> by Coptic Pope Theophilus in 391 AD, as part of his decree to destroy all the pagan temples of the city. The ecclesiastical historian Socrates of Constantinople gives no mention of the books, while lesser-known Christian historian Paulus Orosius (VI.263) <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=O3tJ9mFnwpQC&amp;pg=PA228&amp;source=gbs_toc_r&amp;cad=3#v=snippet&amp;q=book%20chests&amp;f=false">notes</a> that the books burned (of which he laments) were not the same as the original collection of the Library. The other event is the Caliphate’s invasion of Egypt in 642 AD. The destruction of the Library is dubiously recorded by <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/10/abd-al-latifs-account-of-egypt-and-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Abd al-Latif al Baghdadi</a> and <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/24/al-qifti-on-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Ibn al-Qifti</a>, who both claim that ‘Amr ibn al-‘As destroyed the Library by the orders of Caliph Umar. So many burnings, but not one has been definitively set as <em>the </em>destruction of the Library.</p> <p>But enough about the Library. The problem is this false idea of Christianity (especially Catholicism, since we all know that’s the Church attacked for the so-called “Dark Ages”) being absolutely opposed to scholarly and scientific knowledge. One need only read <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3002.htm#article4">Aquinas</a> and <a href="http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_15101998_fides-et-ratio_en.html">John Paul II</a> to see that the tradition of the Church has been <em>fides et ratio</em>, faith and reason, that science and religion are not enemies and should not be viewed as such. Much knowledge was lost in the drawn-out destruction of the Library of Alexandria, but Christianity also preserved much knowledge. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_Library_of_Constantinople">The Imperial Library of Constantinople</a> housed a large collection of Roman and Greek works, begun at the behest of Christian Emperor Constantius II in the 4th Century. Socrates and Plato were vastly influential on the thought of Augustine and Boethius. Many of the Church Fathers, even after Saint Augustine, as well as various authors and poets throughout the Middle Ages, knew well the works of Vergil, Cicero, Sallust, Horace, and Seneca the Younger. Saint Isidore of Seville, bishop and Doctor of the Church, sought to compile and preserve a summary of a large majority of the knowledge of Western antiquity, known as the <em><a href="http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=3ep502syZv8C">Etymologiae</a></em>. The medievals still studied the writings of <a href="http://historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2749">Euclid</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_of_Cremona#Gerard.27s_translations">Archimedes</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eugenius_of_Palermo&amp;redirect=no">Ptolemy</a>. Modern civil law has its roots in the <em>Corpus Juris Civilis </em>(“The Body of Civil Law”), the collection of Roman jurisprudence compiled by the Byzantine Christian Emperor Justinian. Still more Christian writers such as <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08459b.htm">Saint John Damascene</a> and <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01276a.htm">Alcuin of York</a> preserved classical learning and expanded the fields of philosophy and theology.</p> <p>The chart especially ignores the contributions to learning made by Western European Christians (i.e. Catholics) throughout the Middle Ages, including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_Renaissance">Carolingian Renaissance</a> and especially the advances of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Middle_Ages">High Middle Ages</a>. These include the renaissance of architecture (namely the “Gothic” style of the 12th Century), the reinterpretation of Aristotelian learning (especially in terms of renewed interest in dialectics and syllogistic logic) by the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13548a.htm">Scholastics</a>, and the foundations of the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15188a.htm">modern university system</a> (the development of which was <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrasa#Madrasa_and_university">independent of the Islamic <em>madrasa</em></a>), with the oldest in continual use being the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02641b.htm">University of Bologna</a> (since the 11th Century).</p> <p>The chart, and by extension the general sentiment, is also <em>incredibly </em>Eurocentric (in a demeaning way) and <em>vastly</em> oblivious to the advances of other peoples throughout the world, including the Islamic Caliphate, the Tang, Song, and Yuan dynasties in China, and Late Classical India. Many of those civilizations did not suffer such a loss of learning as perceived in Western Europe. The entire idea is distasteful and ignorant.</p> </blockquote> <p>FYI.</p>

<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://agentsama.tumblr.com/post/107299905099/slvrnightx-ultrafacts-aussietory">agentsama</a>:</p> <block...

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<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://agentsama.tumblr.com/post/107299905099/slvrnightx-ultrafacts-aussietory">agentsama</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://slvrnightx.tumblr.com/post/97271985185/ultrafacts-aussietory">slvrnightx</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/97269070131/aussietory-third-way-is-best-way">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://aussietory.tumblr.com/post/97037485207/third-way-is-best-way-tuxedoandex">aussietory</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://third-way-is-best-way.tumblr.com/post/97026410042/tuxedoandex-kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts">third-way-is-best-way</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://tuxedoandex.tumblr.com/post/97009990157/kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts-source-for-more">tuxedoandex</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kvotheunkvothe.tumblr.com/post/91996111874/ultrafacts-source-for-more-facts-follow">kvotheunkvothe</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/91744814059/source-for-more-facts-follow-ultrafacts">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria#Destruction_of_the_Library">Source</a> <strong>For more facts <a href="http://ultrafacts.tumblr.com/">follow Ultrafacts</a></strong></p> </blockquote> <p>EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET <strong>SO ANGRY</strong>.</p> </blockquote> <p>but why</p> </blockquote> <p>Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.</p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="" src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkdeee4gtd1qd4jgjo1_500.jpg"/></p> </blockquote> <p>The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, &amp; important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.</p> </blockquote> <p>I get so sad whenever I think about this.</p> </blockquote> <p>Good God Almighty, not this “Christians ruined knowledge 4ever” bullhockey again. I am <em><strong>so</strong> </em>tired of this overused narrative.</p> <p>Firstly, the destruction of the Library has not been attributed to a specific event. The Library had been in decline years before Jesus was even born. Multiple Roman scholars, including <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14140/14140-h/14140-h.htm#LIFE_OF_C_CAESAR">Plutarch</a> (XLIX.435), <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Roman_History/Book_XXII#XVI">Ammianus Marcellinus</a>, <a href="http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:2007.01.0072:id=v2.p.139">Aulus Gellius</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Of_Peace_of_Mind#IX.">Seneca</a>, record the destruction of books in Alexandria, all placing the events before Christians even existed (Plutarch and Ammian specifically attribute the burning of the Library to Julius Caesar burning his ships in his siege of Alexandria, while Aulus Gellius adds an earlier removal of books by the Persians). Ammian especially hints to the faded glory of Alexandria’s libraries, especially the Serapeum (which also functioned as a temple to the Graeco-Egyptian god Serapis). Further historians attribute the destruction of the library to the ruin of <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=WR9bsvhc4XMC&amp;pg=PA20&amp;lpg=PA20&amp;dq=Brucheion+aurelian&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=idw91tlzf4&amp;sig=bVBajSGaeEQJzGAo8mJZt7uI5c4&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=IoGrVM-LNISlNuzGgLgK&amp;ved=0CCwQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Brucheion%20aurelian&amp;f=false">Brucheion</a> (the location of the Library) Aurelian’s war against the Palmyrene Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century.</p> <p>Two more events are often mentioned as the destruction of the Library. The first is the <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Nicene_and_Post-Nicene_Fathers:_Series_II/Volume_II/Socrates/Book_V/Chapter_16">complete destruction of the Serapeum</a> by Coptic Pope Theophilus in 391 AD, as part of his decree to destroy all the pagan temples of the city. The ecclesiastical historian Socrates of Constantinople gives no mention of the books, while lesser-known Christian historian Paulus Orosius (VI.263) <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=O3tJ9mFnwpQC&amp;pg=PA228&amp;source=gbs_toc_r&amp;cad=3#v=snippet&amp;q=book%20chests&amp;f=false">notes</a> that the books burned (of which he laments) were not the same as the original collection of the Library. The other event is the Caliphate’s invasion of Egypt in 642 AD. The destruction of the Library is dubiously recorded by <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/10/abd-al-latifs-account-of-egypt-and-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Abd al-Latif al Baghdadi</a> and <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/24/al-qifti-on-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Ibn al-Qifti</a>, who both claim that ‘Amr ibn al-‘As destroyed the Library by the orders of Caliph Umar. So many burnings, but not one has been definitively set as <em>the </em>destruction of the Library.</p> <p>But enough about the Library. The problem is this false idea of Christianity (especially Catholicism, since we all know that’s the Church attacked for the so-called “Dark Ages”) being absolutely opposed to scholarly and scientific knowledge. One need only read <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3002.htm#article4">Aquinas</a> and <a href="http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_15101998_fides-et-ratio_en.html">John Paul II</a> to see that the tradition of the Church has been <em>fides et ratio</em>, faith and reason, that science and religion are not enemies and should not be viewed as such. Much knowledge was lost in the drawn-out destruction of the Library of Alexandria, but Christianity also preserved much knowledge. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_Library_of_Constantinople">The Imperial Library of Constantinople</a> housed a large collection of Roman and Greek works, begun at the behest of Christian Emperor Constantius II in the 4th Century. Socrates and Plato were vastly influential on the thought of Augustine and Boethius. Many of the Church Fathers, even after Saint Augustine, as well as various authors and poets throughout the Middle Ages, knew well the works of Vergil, Cicero, Sallust, Horace, and Seneca the Younger. Saint Isidore of Seville, bishop and Doctor of the Church, sought to compile and preserve a summary of a large majority of the knowledge of Western antiquity, known as the <em><a href="http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=3ep502syZv8C">Etymologiae</a></em>. The medievals still studied the writings of <a href="http://historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2749">Euclid</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_of_Cremona#Gerard.27s_translations">Archimedes</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eugenius_of_Palermo&amp;redirect=no">Ptolemy</a>. Modern civil law has its roots in the <em>Corpus Juris Civilis </em>(“The Body of Civil Law”), the collection of Roman jurisprudence compiled by the Byzantine Christian Emperor Justinian. Still more Christian writers such as <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08459b.htm">Saint John Damascene</a> and <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01276a.htm">Alcuin of York</a> preserved classical learning and expanded the fields of philosophy and theology.</p> <p>The chart especially ignores the contributions to learning made by Western European Christians (i.e. Catholics) throughout the Middle Ages, including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_Renaissance">Carolingian Renaissance</a> and especially the advances of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Middle_Ages">High Middle Ages</a>. These include the renaissance of architecture (namely the “Gothic” style of the 12th Century), the reinterpretation of Aristotelian learning (especially in terms of renewed interest in dialectics and syllogistic logic) by the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13548a.htm">Scholastics</a>, and the foundations of the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15188a.htm">modern university system</a> (the development of which was <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrasa#Madrasa_and_university">independent of the Islamic <em>madrasa</em></a>), with the oldest in continual use being the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02641b.htm">University of Bologna</a> (since the 11th Century).</p> <p>The chart, and by extension the general sentiment, is also <em>incredibly </em>Eurocentric (in a demeaning way) and <em>vastly</em> oblivious to the advances of other peoples throughout the world, including the Islamic Caliphate, the Tang, Song, and Yuan dynasties in China, and Late Classical India. Many of those civilizations did not suffer such a loss of learning as perceived in Western Europe. The entire idea is distasteful and ignorant.</p> </blockquote> <p>#getrekt</p>: In ancient Egypt, any books found in ships coming into port, would be brought immediately to the library of Alexandria and be copied. The original would be kept in the library and the copy given back to the owner. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://agentsama.tumblr.com/post/107299905099/slvrnightx-ultrafacts-aussietory">agentsama</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://slvrnightx.tumblr.com/post/97271985185/ultrafacts-aussietory">slvrnightx</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/97269070131/aussietory-third-way-is-best-way">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://aussietory.tumblr.com/post/97037485207/third-way-is-best-way-tuxedoandex">aussietory</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://third-way-is-best-way.tumblr.com/post/97026410042/tuxedoandex-kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts">third-way-is-best-way</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://tuxedoandex.tumblr.com/post/97009990157/kvotheunkvothe-ultrafacts-source-for-more">tuxedoandex</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kvotheunkvothe.tumblr.com/post/91996111874/ultrafacts-source-for-more-facts-follow">kvotheunkvothe</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://ultrafactsblog.com/post/91744814059/source-for-more-facts-follow-ultrafacts">ultrafacts</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria#Destruction_of_the_Library">Source</a> <strong>For more facts <a href="http://ultrafacts.tumblr.com/">follow Ultrafacts</a></strong></p> </blockquote> <p>EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET <strong>SO ANGRY</strong>.</p> </blockquote> <p>but why</p> </blockquote> <p>Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.</p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="" src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkdeee4gtd1qd4jgjo1_500.jpg"/></p> </blockquote> <p>The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, &amp; important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.</p> </blockquote> <p>I get so sad whenever I think about this.</p> </blockquote> <p>Good God Almighty, not this “Christians ruined knowledge 4ever” bullhockey again. I am <em><strong>so</strong> </em>tired of this overused narrative.</p> <p>Firstly, the destruction of the Library has not been attributed to a specific event. The Library had been in decline years before Jesus was even born. Multiple Roman scholars, including <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14140/14140-h/14140-h.htm#LIFE_OF_C_CAESAR">Plutarch</a> (XLIX.435), <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Roman_History/Book_XXII#XVI">Ammianus Marcellinus</a>, <a href="http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:2007.01.0072:id=v2.p.139">Aulus Gellius</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Of_Peace_of_Mind#IX.">Seneca</a>, record the destruction of books in Alexandria, all placing the events before Christians even existed (Plutarch and Ammian specifically attribute the burning of the Library to Julius Caesar burning his ships in his siege of Alexandria, while Aulus Gellius adds an earlier removal of books by the Persians). Ammian especially hints to the faded glory of Alexandria’s libraries, especially the Serapeum (which also functioned as a temple to the Graeco-Egyptian god Serapis). Further historians attribute the destruction of the library to the ruin of <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=WR9bsvhc4XMC&amp;pg=PA20&amp;lpg=PA20&amp;dq=Brucheion+aurelian&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=idw91tlzf4&amp;sig=bVBajSGaeEQJzGAo8mJZt7uI5c4&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=IoGrVM-LNISlNuzGgLgK&amp;ved=0CCwQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Brucheion%20aurelian&amp;f=false">Brucheion</a> (the location of the Library) Aurelian’s war against the Palmyrene Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century.</p> <p>Two more events are often mentioned as the destruction of the Library. The first is the <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Nicene_and_Post-Nicene_Fathers:_Series_II/Volume_II/Socrates/Book_V/Chapter_16">complete destruction of the Serapeum</a> by Coptic Pope Theophilus in 391 AD, as part of his decree to destroy all the pagan temples of the city. The ecclesiastical historian Socrates of Constantinople gives no mention of the books, while lesser-known Christian historian Paulus Orosius (VI.263) <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=O3tJ9mFnwpQC&amp;pg=PA228&amp;source=gbs_toc_r&amp;cad=3#v=snippet&amp;q=book%20chests&amp;f=false">notes</a> that the books burned (of which he laments) were not the same as the original collection of the Library. The other event is the Caliphate’s invasion of Egypt in 642 AD. The destruction of the Library is dubiously recorded by <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/10/abd-al-latifs-account-of-egypt-and-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Abd al-Latif al Baghdadi</a> and <a href="http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2010/09/24/al-qifti-on-the-destruction-of-the-library-of-alexandria/">Ibn al-Qifti</a>, who both claim that ‘Amr ibn al-‘As destroyed the Library by the orders of Caliph Umar. So many burnings, but not one has been definitively set as <em>the </em>destruction of the Library.</p> <p>But enough about the Library. The problem is this false idea of Christianity (especially Catholicism, since we all know that’s the Church attacked for the so-called “Dark Ages”) being absolutely opposed to scholarly and scientific knowledge. One need only read <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3002.htm#article4">Aquinas</a> and <a href="http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_15101998_fides-et-ratio_en.html">John Paul II</a> to see that the tradition of the Church has been <em>fides et ratio</em>, faith and reason, that science and religion are not enemies and should not be viewed as such. Much knowledge was lost in the drawn-out destruction of the Library of Alexandria, but Christianity also preserved much knowledge. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_Library_of_Constantinople">The Imperial Library of Constantinople</a> housed a large collection of Roman and Greek works, begun at the behest of Christian Emperor Constantius II in the 4th Century. Socrates and Plato were vastly influential on the thought of Augustine and Boethius. Many of the Church Fathers, even after Saint Augustine, as well as various authors and poets throughout the Middle Ages, knew well the works of Vergil, Cicero, Sallust, Horace, and Seneca the Younger. Saint Isidore of Seville, bishop and Doctor of the Church, sought to compile and preserve a summary of a large majority of the knowledge of Western antiquity, known as the <em><a href="http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=3ep502syZv8C">Etymologiae</a></em>. The medievals still studied the writings of <a href="http://historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2749">Euclid</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_of_Cremona#Gerard.27s_translations">Archimedes</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eugenius_of_Palermo&amp;redirect=no">Ptolemy</a>. Modern civil law has its roots in the <em>Corpus Juris Civilis </em>(“The Body of Civil Law”), the collection of Roman jurisprudence compiled by the Byzantine Christian Emperor Justinian. Still more Christian writers such as <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08459b.htm">Saint John Damascene</a> and <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01276a.htm">Alcuin of York</a> preserved classical learning and expanded the fields of philosophy and theology.</p> <p>The chart especially ignores the contributions to learning made by Western European Christians (i.e. Catholics) throughout the Middle Ages, including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_Renaissance">Carolingian Renaissance</a> and especially the advances of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Middle_Ages">High Middle Ages</a>. These include the renaissance of architecture (namely the “Gothic” style of the 12th Century), the reinterpretation of Aristotelian learning (especially in terms of renewed interest in dialectics and syllogistic logic) by the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13548a.htm">Scholastics</a>, and the foundations of the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15188a.htm">modern university system</a> (the development of which was <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrasa#Madrasa_and_university">independent of the Islamic <em>madrasa</em></a>), with the oldest in continual use being the <a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02641b.htm">University of Bologna</a> (since the 11th Century).</p> <p>The chart, and by extension the general sentiment, is also <em>incredibly </em>Eurocentric (in a demeaning way) and <em>vastly</em> oblivious to the advances of other peoples throughout the world, including the Islamic Caliphate, the Tang, Song, and Yuan dynasties in China, and Late Classical India. Many of those civilizations did not suffer such a loss of learning as perceived in Western Europe. The entire idea is distasteful and ignorant.</p> </blockquote> <p>#getrekt</p>

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