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rainnecassidy: congenitalprogramming: cotestuck: montypla: meloromantics: appropriately-inappropriate: audreyvhorne: sttinkerbelle: vmpolung: knowledgeandlove: Photo source Fact check source #and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work. That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will. This is why honey is not vegan. The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus. The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc. Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival. It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly. literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey Beekeepers- Provide a home for the bees Keep that home warm in the winter Keep the bees well fed, negating the need for honey, which the bees would make anyways Still do not take all the honey, just in case Protect the bees from predators Monitor the hives for any signs of the parasites, diseases, etc. that cause colony collapse disorder Their bees- Provide a valuable and reliable source of pollination for plants in the area, both wild and crops Help keep the local ecosystem healthy Honey- Is one of the healthiest things you can eat Is able to keep for a EXTREMELY long time (Millennia even), making it more valuable than many perishable foods without being full of preservatives Can be used to soothe sore throats, nauseau, etc. Has been eaten by humans since at least Ancient Egypt (We’ve found STILL EDIBLE honey in tombs) Is a great tool in cooking, adding sweetness without raising the sugar content much Is a staple food in many people’s diets Honey is amazing you can put it on or in pretty much everything I goddamn love it and you should too. Honey is also a natural antimicrobial that has been used medicinally since time out of mind on external wounds like edible neosporin. Particularly useful in the treatment of dermal abcesses. “oh no we steal it from the bees!”*has no problem benefiting from exploited migrant farm workers* ^^^ : A teaspoon of honey represents the life work of 12 bees. rainnecassidy: congenitalprogramming: cotestuck: montypla: meloromantics: appropriately-inappropriate: audreyvhorne: sttinkerbelle: vmpolung: knowledgeandlove: Photo source Fact check source #and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work. That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will. This is why honey is not vegan. The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus. The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc. Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival. It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly. literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey Beekeepers- Provide a home for the bees Keep that home warm in the winter Keep the bees well fed, negating the need for honey, which the bees would make anyways Still do not take all the honey, just in case Protect the bees from predators Monitor the hives for any signs of the parasites, diseases, etc. that cause colony collapse disorder Their bees- Provide a valuable and reliable source of pollination for plants in the area, both wild and crops Help keep the local ecosystem healthy Honey- Is one of the healthiest things you can eat Is able to keep for a EXTREMELY long time (Millennia even), making it more valuable than many perishable foods without being full of preservatives Can be used to soothe sore throats, nauseau, etc. Has been eaten by humans since at least Ancient Egypt (We’ve found STILL EDIBLE honey in tombs) Is a great tool in cooking, adding sweetness without raising the sugar content much Is a staple food in many people’s diets Honey is amazing you can put it on or in pretty much everything I goddamn love it and you should too. Honey is also a natural antimicrobial that has been used medicinally since time out of mind on external wounds like edible neosporin. Particularly useful in the treatment of dermal abcesses. “oh no we steal it from the bees!”*has no problem benefiting from exploited migrant farm workers* ^^^
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chuppa-thingy: curlicuecal: pts-m-d: thetrippytrip: dont you just love capitalism..   Black Mirror predicted this we are all goona die my god but I get mad when someone flippantly dismisses important scientific progress because you can make it sound dumb by framing it the right way. For a start, of course a lot of science sounds dumb.  Science is all in the slogging through the minutiae, the failures, the tedious process of filling in the blank spaces on the map because it ain’t ’t glamorous, but if someone doesn’t do it, no one gets to know for sure what’s there. Someone’s gotta spend their career measuring fly genitalia under a microscope. Frankly, I’m grateful to the person who is tackling that tedium, because if they didn’t, I might have to, and I don’t wanna. But let’s talk about why we should care about this particular science and spend money on it. (And I’ll even answer without even glancing at the article.) Off the top of my head? -advances in robotics -advances in miniature robotics -advances in flight technology -advantages in simulating and understanding the mechanics and programming of small intelligences -ability to grow crops in places uninhabitable by insects (space? cold/hot? places where honeybees are non-native and detrimental to the ecosystem?) -ability to improve productivity density of crops and feed more people -less strain on bees, who do poorly when forced to pollinate monocultures of low nutrition plants -ability to run tightly controlled experiments on pollination, on the effects of bees on plant physiology, on ecosystem dynamics, etc -fucking robot bees, my friend -hahaha think how confused those flowers must be Also worth keeping in mind? People love, love, love framing science in condescending and silly sounding terms as an excuse to cut funding to vital programs. *Especially* if it’s also associated with something (gasp) ‘inappropriate’, like sex or ladyparts. This is why research for a lot of women’s issues, lgbtq+ issues, minorities’ issues, and vulnerable groups in general’s issues tends to lag so far behind the times. This is why some groups are pushing so hard to cut funding for climate change research these days. Anything that’s acquired governmental funding has been through an intensely competitive, months-to-years long screening by EXPERTS IN THE FIELD who have a very good idea what research is likely to be most beneficial to that field and fill a needed gap. Trust me.  The paperwork haunts my nightmares. So, we had a joke in my lab: “Nice work, college boy.” It was the phrase for any project that you could spend years and years working on and end up with results that could be summed up on a single, pretty slide with an apparently obvious graph. The phrase was taken from something a grower said at a talk my advisor gave as a graduate student: “So you proved that plants grow better when they’re watered? Nice work, college boy.” But like, the thing is? There’s always more details than that. And a lot of times it’s important that somebody questions our assumptions.  A labmate of mine doing very similar research demonstrated that our assumptions about the effect of water stress on plant fitness have been wrong for years because *nobody had thought to separate out the different WAYS a plant can be water stressed.* (Continuously, in bursts, etc.). And it turns out these ways have *drastically different effects* with drastically different measures required for response to them to keep from losing lots of money and resources in agriculture. Nice work, college boy. :p Point the second: surprise! Anna Haldewang is an industrial design student.  She developed this in her product design class.  And, as far as I can tell, she has had no particular funding at all for this project, much less billions of dollars.  ‘grats, Anna, you FUCKING ROCK. ps: On a lighter note, summarizing research to make it sound stupid is both easy AND fun. Check out @lolmythesis – I HIGHLY RECOMMEND. :33 Okay, so I actually know Anna. She is my classmate and my friend, and I know this project quite well. And I could not have put the above statement any better. Here’s the thing guys, bumblebees are endangered, but they have a very important roll in our ecosystem. While we are doing everything we can to stabalize the bee populations, we also have to make sure that an important job is being done in our ecosystem. This drone was a conceptual way to aid that as we work to stabalize bee populations. I have never been so mad at Tumblr before. This is a huge accomplishment for a student, let alone a female in our male dominated industry. Stop shitting on everything, it doesn’t make you cool. Oh and actually read into things before you go tearing them apart. : CNN @CNN CAN Plan Bee' is a personal robotic bee designed to mimic how bees pollinate flowers and crops cnn.it/21QKbuY jaküb @sadandchildish instead of saving the environment and helping actual bees let's spend billions on robots that do what bees would do for free CNN @CNN Plan Bee' is a personal robotic bee designed to mimic how bees pollinate flowers and crops cnn.it/21QKbuY chuppa-thingy: curlicuecal: pts-m-d: thetrippytrip: dont you just love capitalism..   Black Mirror predicted this we are all goona die my god but I get mad when someone flippantly dismisses important scientific progress because you can make it sound dumb by framing it the right way. For a start, of course a lot of science sounds dumb.  Science is all in the slogging through the minutiae, the failures, the tedious process of filling in the blank spaces on the map because it ain’t ’t glamorous, but if someone doesn’t do it, no one gets to know for sure what’s there. Someone’s gotta spend their career measuring fly genitalia under a microscope. Frankly, I’m grateful to the person who is tackling that tedium, because if they didn’t, I might have to, and I don’t wanna. But let’s talk about why we should care about this particular science and spend money on it. (And I’ll even answer without even glancing at the article.) Off the top of my head? -advances in robotics -advances in miniature robotics -advances in flight technology -advantages in simulating and understanding the mechanics and programming of small intelligences -ability to grow crops in places uninhabitable by insects (space? cold/hot? places where honeybees are non-native and detrimental to the ecosystem?) -ability to improve productivity density of crops and feed more people -less strain on bees, who do poorly when forced to pollinate monocultures of low nutrition plants -ability to run tightly controlled experiments on pollination, on the effects of bees on plant physiology, on ecosystem dynamics, etc -fucking robot bees, my friend -hahaha think how confused those flowers must be Also worth keeping in mind? People love, love, love framing science in condescending and silly sounding terms as an excuse to cut funding to vital programs. *Especially* if it’s also associated with something (gasp) ‘inappropriate’, like sex or ladyparts. This is why research for a lot of women’s issues, lgbtq+ issues, minorities’ issues, and vulnerable groups in general’s issues tends to lag so far behind the times. This is why some groups are pushing so hard to cut funding for climate change research these days. Anything that’s acquired governmental funding has been through an intensely competitive, months-to-years long screening by EXPERTS IN THE FIELD who have a very good idea what research is likely to be most beneficial to that field and fill a needed gap. Trust me.  The paperwork haunts my nightmares. So, we had a joke in my lab: “Nice work, college boy.” It was the phrase for any project that you could spend years and years working on and end up with results that could be summed up on a single, pretty slide with an apparently obvious graph. The phrase was taken from something a grower said at a talk my advisor gave as a graduate student: “So you proved that plants grow better when they’re watered? Nice work, college boy.” But like, the thing is? There’s always more details than that. And a lot of times it’s important that somebody questions our assumptions.  A labmate of mine doing very similar research demonstrated that our assumptions about the effect of water stress on plant fitness have been wrong for years because *nobody had thought to separate out the different WAYS a plant can be water stressed.* (Continuously, in bursts, etc.). And it turns out these ways have *drastically different effects* with drastically different measures required for response to them to keep from losing lots of money and resources in agriculture. Nice work, college boy. :p Point the second: surprise! Anna Haldewang is an industrial design student.  She developed this in her product design class.  And, as far as I can tell, she has had no particular funding at all for this project, much less billions of dollars.  ‘grats, Anna, you FUCKING ROCK. ps: On a lighter note, summarizing research to make it sound stupid is both easy AND fun. Check out @lolmythesis – I HIGHLY RECOMMEND. :33 Okay, so I actually know Anna. She is my classmate and my friend, and I know this project quite well. And I could not have put the above statement any better. Here’s the thing guys, bumblebees are endangered, but they have a very important roll in our ecosystem. While we are doing everything we can to stabalize the bee populations, we also have to make sure that an important job is being done in our ecosystem. This drone was a conceptual way to aid that as we work to stabalize bee populations. I have never been so mad at Tumblr before. This is a huge accomplishment for a student, let alone a female in our male dominated industry. Stop shitting on everything, it doesn’t make you cool. Oh and actually read into things before you go tearing them apart.
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phantom-solitaire: fenrislorsrai: magickandmoss: temporarilypermanenturl: benwinstagram: kanyolo: nuggetfucker98: legalizeact: #SaveTheTrees I feel like an important message is trying to be communicated to me but I have no idea what it is Our forests are being cut down 3x faster than they can grow! One acre of hemp produces as much cellulose fiber pulp as 4.1 acres of trees!!! This is super useful for so many things, especially paper production! In addition, hemp takes in carbon dioxide 4x as fast as trees do, which makes it especially valuable in the act of reducing CO2 emissions/greenhouse gases! 🌲🌲🌲 source  #the scope of the anti-hemp conspiracy in the united states is terrifying once you start doing research tbh#like it was initially smeared/banned bc lumber lobbyists pushed for it to be…#and a major smear tactic was to associate it with black people#who now a hundred years later are the ones primarily being imprisoned for it#and the plant itself has now been inextricably linked to the drug so people won’t even allow for it to be grown for commercial purposes#like paper making (via literallyfuckeveryone) Important reminder that industrial hemp can’t be used as a recreational drug, so if anyone tries to pull that card you can just stop them then and there. There are no real arguments against using industrial hemp, even if you’re rigidly against the legalization of any recreational drugs. AYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY I never see pro-hemp on my dash, woo! Usually the argument on why you can’t have hemp is because then people will hide marijuana in it. yeah, sure…. if they want shitty, shitty marijuana. It would be like growing sweet corn and dent corn together.  Yeah, they look similar at a distance and they’re closely related, but you don’t want them next to each other as they’ll cross pollinate and you’ll end up with bad versions of both. Same deal here.  a patch of marijuana grown in an open field of hemp IS going to get contaminated and it’ll lower quality of BOTH crops.  Your hemp farmer doesn’t want that and if likely going rip out any patches trespassers try to add for same reason.  and the big issue is not even the THC content.  Because most quality marijuana is intended to be grown indoors or greenhouses, its a dwarf variety. Short.  Fiber hemp is bred for height so as to maximize fiber production.  super tall. It’s going to be really obvious, really fast if you’ve got both in the same field even before you get to the point of pollination. what’s this runty bullshit doing in my field? They also have different growing needs with regards to spacing, harvest time, etc. so the argument that you can hide marijuana in industrial hemp fields are basically bullshit. anyway… aside from paper, hemp fiber can also be used to make earthquake resistant concrete that’s actually LIGHTER than conventional concrete while being stronger. It’s better at resisting flexing or warping, so ideal for stuff like bridges and highway supports as it’ll better resist large temperature swings and vibration. (”hempcrete” is slightly different, but makes great fire resistant insulation) You can also use the waste after fiber harvest for animal fodder, including silage. Comparable to corn. and remember, that’s the waste after you’ve harvested for fiber! Just to add, it can be used for paper, concrete, insulation, cloth and rope (both rough like sack cloth and smooth like cotton), bio degradable plastics (oddly same for banana trees I believe) and then of course for things like fishing lines and nets etc. It’s a very versatile and useful plant that has been used for hundreds or maybe even thousands of years for material uses, and with modern advances is becoming even more useful thanks to chemical engineering and similar. : Trees mature ih 50F1oo years Hemp matures in as little as 10o days phantom-solitaire: fenrislorsrai: magickandmoss: temporarilypermanenturl: benwinstagram: kanyolo: nuggetfucker98: legalizeact: #SaveTheTrees I feel like an important message is trying to be communicated to me but I have no idea what it is Our forests are being cut down 3x faster than they can grow! One acre of hemp produces as much cellulose fiber pulp as 4.1 acres of trees!!! This is super useful for so many things, especially paper production! In addition, hemp takes in carbon dioxide 4x as fast as trees do, which makes it especially valuable in the act of reducing CO2 emissions/greenhouse gases! 🌲🌲🌲 source  #the scope of the anti-hemp conspiracy in the united states is terrifying once you start doing research tbh#like it was initially smeared/banned bc lumber lobbyists pushed for it to be…#and a major smear tactic was to associate it with black people#who now a hundred years later are the ones primarily being imprisoned for it#and the plant itself has now been inextricably linked to the drug so people won’t even allow for it to be grown for commercial purposes#like paper making (via literallyfuckeveryone) Important reminder that industrial hemp can’t be used as a recreational drug, so if anyone tries to pull that card you can just stop them then and there. There are no real arguments against using industrial hemp, even if you’re rigidly against the legalization of any recreational drugs. AYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY I never see pro-hemp on my dash, woo! Usually the argument on why you can’t have hemp is because then people will hide marijuana in it. yeah, sure…. if they want shitty, shitty marijuana. It would be like growing sweet corn and dent corn together.  Yeah, they look similar at a distance and they’re closely related, but you don’t want them next to each other as they’ll cross pollinate and you’ll end up with bad versions of both. Same deal here.  a patch of marijuana grown in an open field of hemp IS going to get contaminated and it’ll lower quality of BOTH crops.  Your hemp farmer doesn’t want that and if likely going rip out any patches trespassers try to add for same reason.  and the big issue is not even the THC content.  Because most quality marijuana is intended to be grown indoors or greenhouses, its a dwarf variety. Short.  Fiber hemp is bred for height so as to maximize fiber production.  super tall. It’s going to be really obvious, really fast if you’ve got both in the same field even before you get to the point of pollination. what’s this runty bullshit doing in my field? They also have different growing needs with regards to spacing, harvest time, etc. so the argument that you can hide marijuana in industrial hemp fields are basically bullshit. anyway… aside from paper, hemp fiber can also be used to make earthquake resistant concrete that’s actually LIGHTER than conventional concrete while being stronger. It’s better at resisting flexing or warping, so ideal for stuff like bridges and highway supports as it’ll better resist large temperature swings and vibration. (”hempcrete” is slightly different, but makes great fire resistant insulation) You can also use the waste after fiber harvest for animal fodder, including silage. Comparable to corn. and remember, that’s the waste after you’ve harvested for fiber! Just to add, it can be used for paper, concrete, insulation, cloth and rope (both rough like sack cloth and smooth like cotton), bio degradable plastics (oddly same for banana trees I believe) and then of course for things like fishing lines and nets etc. It’s a very versatile and useful plant that has been used for hundreds or maybe even thousands of years for material uses, and with modern advances is becoming even more useful thanks to chemical engineering and similar.
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Repost @shirohyde ・・・ File : "Kantong Semar" Kantong Semar (Nepenthes) Kantong Semar adalah tumbuhan berumah-dua, dimana bunga jantan dan betina tumbuh pada tumbuhan yang berbeda, dan hanya berbunga saat kantong bagian atas diproduksi. Bunga tumbuhan ini menghasilkan nektar dalam jumlah besar saat menjelang siang dan malam, dan menguap saat pagi hari. Nektar ini menarik perhatian lalat saat menjelang siang dan ngengat saat menjelang malam untuk membantu penyerbukan. sumber : arkive.org BBC Planet Earth ________________________ File : "Tropical Pitcher Plant" Tropical Pitcher Plant (Nepenthes) Pitcher plants are dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers grow on separate plants, and only begin to flower once the upper pitchers are produced. The flowers produce large amounts of nectar during the early evening and night, which evaporates by morning. This nectar attracts flies during the early evening and moths at night to aid pollination. source : arkive.org BBC Planet Earth ________________________ komikinajah maleminajah selasaedukasi: EAT. RLIN KANTONG SEMAR TROPICAL PITCHER PLANT "KANTONG SEMAR" SHIROHYDE Repost @shirohyde ・・・ File : "Kantong Semar" Kantong Semar (Nepenthes) Kantong Semar adalah tumbuhan berumah-dua, dimana bunga jantan dan betina tumbuh pada tumbuhan yang berbeda, dan hanya berbunga saat kantong bagian atas diproduksi. Bunga tumbuhan ini menghasilkan nektar dalam jumlah besar saat menjelang siang dan malam, dan menguap saat pagi hari. Nektar ini menarik perhatian lalat saat menjelang siang dan ngengat saat menjelang malam untuk membantu penyerbukan. sumber : arkive.org BBC Planet Earth ________________________ File : "Tropical Pitcher Plant" Tropical Pitcher Plant (Nepenthes) Pitcher plants are dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers grow on separate plants, and only begin to flower once the upper pitchers are produced. The flowers produce large amounts of nectar during the early evening and night, which evaporates by morning. This nectar attracts flies during the early evening and moths at night to aid pollination. source : arkive.org BBC Planet Earth ________________________ komikinajah maleminajah selasaedukasi

Repost @shirohyde ・・・ File : "Kantong Semar" Kantong Semar (Nepenthes) Kantong Semar adalah tumbuhan berumah-dua, dimana bunga jantan dan...

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andrusi: downtroddendeity: curlicuecal: pts-m-d: thetrippytrip: dont you just love capitalism..   Black Mirror predicted this we are all goona die my god but I get mad when someone flippantly dismisses important scientific progress because you can make it sound dumb by framing it the right way. For a start, of course a lot of science sounds dumb.  Science is all in the slogging through the minutiae, the failures, the tedious process of filling in the blank spaces on the map because it ain’t ’t glamorous, but if someone doesn’t do it, no one gets to know for sure what’s there. Someone’s gotta spend their career measuring fly genitalia under a microscope. Frankly, I’m grateful to the person who is tackling that tedium, because if they didn’t, I might have to, and I don’t wanna. But let’s talk about why we should care about this particular science and spend money on it. (And I’ll even answer without even glancing at the article.) Off the top of my head? -advances in robotics -advances in miniature robotics -advances in flight technology -advantages in simulating and understanding the mechanics and programming of small intelligences -ability to grow crops in places uninhabitable by insects (space? cold/hot? places where honeybees are non-native and detrimental to the ecosystem?) -ability to improve productivity density of crops and feed more people -less strain on bees, who do poorly when forced to pollinate monocultures of low nutrition plants -ability to run tightly controlled experiments on pollination, on the effects of bees on plant physiology, on ecosystem dynamics, etc -fucking robot bees, my friend -hahaha think how confused those flowers must be Also worth keeping in mind? People love, love, love framing science in condescending and silly sounding terms as an excuse to cut funding to vital programs. *Especially* if it’s also associated with something (gasp) ‘inappropriate’, like sex or ladyparts. This is why research for a lot of women’s issues, lgbtq+ issues, minorities’ issues, and vulnerable groups in general’s issues tends to lag so far behind the times. This is why some groups are pushing so hard to cut funding for climate change research these days. Anything that’s acquired governmental funding has been through and intensely competitive, months-to-years long screening by EXPERTS IN THE FIELD who have a very good idea what research is likely to be most beneficial to that field and fill a needed gap. Trust me.  The paperwork haunts my nightmares. So, we had a joke in my lab: “Nice work, college boy.” It was the phrase for any project that you could spend years and years working on and end up with results that could be summed up on a single, pretty slide with an apparently obvious graph. The phrase was taken from something a grower said at a talk my advisor gave as a graduate student: “So you proved that plants grow better when they’re watered? Nice work, college boy.” But like, the thing is? There’s always more details than that. And a lot of times it’s important that somebody questions our assumptions.  A labmate of mine doing very similar research demonstrated that our assumptions about the effect of water stress on plant fitness have been wrong for years because *nobody had thought to separate out the different WAYS a plant can be water stressed.* (Continuously, in bursts, etc.). And it turns out these ways have *drastically different effects* with drastically different measures required for response to them to keep from losing lots of money and resources in agriculture. Nice work, college boy. :p Point the second: surprise! Anna Haldewang is an industrial design student.  She developed this in her product design class.  And, as far as I can tell, she has had no particular funding at all for this project, much less billions of dollars.  ‘grats, Anna, you FUCKING ROCK. ps: On a lighter note, summarizing research to make it sound stupid is both easy AND fun. Check out @lolmythesis​ – I HIGHLY RECOMMEND. :33 @curlicuecal I’d also like to chime in that a chunk of my family are apple farmers, and one thing I learned visiting them is that you can’t always let bees pollinate. With certain apple varieties, people have to go out with little paintbrushes to pollinate them by hand, because if they cross-pollinate with the wrong variety the apples won’t come out the same. Beebots could potentially be a huge time-saver at that task, because depending on how the algorithms work, you could just tell them “Don’t go into the Gala field next door” and let them do the job more efficiently than you without having to worry about getting weird mutant apples. Also holy shit all science is not interchangeable.  Nobody got up one morning and said “instead of saving the bees I’m going to build a bee robot.” : CNN @CNN CAN Plan Bee' is a personal robotic bee designed to mimic how bees pollinate flowers and crops cnn.it/21QKbuY jaküb @sadandchildish instead of saving the environment and helping actual bees let's spend billions on robots that do what bees would do for free CNN @CNN Plan Bee' is a personal robotic bee designed to mimic how bees pollinate flowers and crops cnn.it/21QKbuY andrusi: downtroddendeity: curlicuecal: pts-m-d: thetrippytrip: dont you just love capitalism..   Black Mirror predicted this we are all goona die my god but I get mad when someone flippantly dismisses important scientific progress because you can make it sound dumb by framing it the right way. For a start, of course a lot of science sounds dumb.  Science is all in the slogging through the minutiae, the failures, the tedious process of filling in the blank spaces on the map because it ain’t ’t glamorous, but if someone doesn’t do it, no one gets to know for sure what’s there. Someone’s gotta spend their career measuring fly genitalia under a microscope. Frankly, I’m grateful to the person who is tackling that tedium, because if they didn’t, I might have to, and I don’t wanna. But let’s talk about why we should care about this particular science and spend money on it. (And I’ll even answer without even glancing at the article.) Off the top of my head? -advances in robotics -advances in miniature robotics -advances in flight technology -advantages in simulating and understanding the mechanics and programming of small intelligences -ability to grow crops in places uninhabitable by insects (space? cold/hot? places where honeybees are non-native and detrimental to the ecosystem?) -ability to improve productivity density of crops and feed more people -less strain on bees, who do poorly when forced to pollinate monocultures of low nutrition plants -ability to run tightly controlled experiments on pollination, on the effects of bees on plant physiology, on ecosystem dynamics, etc -fucking robot bees, my friend -hahaha think how confused those flowers must be Also worth keeping in mind? People love, love, love framing science in condescending and silly sounding terms as an excuse to cut funding to vital programs. *Especially* if it’s also associated with something (gasp) ‘inappropriate’, like sex or ladyparts. This is why research for a lot of women’s issues, lgbtq+ issues, minorities’ issues, and vulnerable groups in general’s issues tends to lag so far behind the times. This is why some groups are pushing so hard to cut funding for climate change research these days. Anything that’s acquired governmental funding has been through and intensely competitive, months-to-years long screening by EXPERTS IN THE FIELD who have a very good idea what research is likely to be most beneficial to that field and fill a needed gap. Trust me.  The paperwork haunts my nightmares. So, we had a joke in my lab: “Nice work, college boy.” It was the phrase for any project that you could spend years and years working on and end up with results that could be summed up on a single, pretty slide with an apparently obvious graph. The phrase was taken from something a grower said at a talk my advisor gave as a graduate student: “So you proved that plants grow better when they’re watered? Nice work, college boy.” But like, the thing is? There’s always more details than that. And a lot of times it’s important that somebody questions our assumptions.  A labmate of mine doing very similar research demonstrated that our assumptions about the effect of water stress on plant fitness have been wrong for years because *nobody had thought to separate out the different WAYS a plant can be water stressed.* (Continuously, in bursts, etc.). And it turns out these ways have *drastically different effects* with drastically different measures required for response to them to keep from losing lots of money and resources in agriculture. Nice work, college boy. :p Point the second: surprise! Anna Haldewang is an industrial design student.  She developed this in her product design class.  And, as far as I can tell, she has had no particular funding at all for this project, much less billions of dollars.  ‘grats, Anna, you FUCKING ROCK. ps: On a lighter note, summarizing research to make it sound stupid is both easy AND fun. Check out @lolmythesis​ – I HIGHLY RECOMMEND. :33 @curlicuecal I’d also like to chime in that a chunk of my family are apple farmers, and one thing I learned visiting them is that you can’t always let bees pollinate. With certain apple varieties, people have to go out with little paintbrushes to pollinate them by hand, because if they cross-pollinate with the wrong variety the apples won’t come out the same. Beebots could potentially be a huge time-saver at that task, because depending on how the algorithms work, you could just tell them “Don’t go into the Gala field next door” and let them do the job more efficiently than you without having to worry about getting weird mutant apples. Also holy shit all science is not interchangeable.  Nobody got up one morning and said “instead of saving the bees I’m going to build a bee robot.”
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