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arctic-hands: swan2swan: swan2swan: If you haven’t seen this story, look up his name: Francisco Galicia.  Expect to see him come 2020, when the debates begin and the political battle heats up. Expect to see him in a suit testifying in court, or before Congress. This young man is a witness and a victim, and the fact that this isn’t a more prominent story on every news station is what truly frightens me. From The Dallas News: Galicia says he lost 26 pounds during that time in a South Texas immigrant detention center because officers didn’t provide him with enough food. He said he wasn’t allowed to shower and his skin was dry and dirty. He and 60 other men were crammed into an overcrowded holding area where they slept on the floor and were given only aluminum-foil blankets, he said. Some men had to sleep on the restroom area floor. Ticks bit some of the men and some were very sick, Galicia said. But many were afraid to ask to go to the doctor because CBP officers told them their stay would start over if they did, he said. I would remind you that concentration camps are actually real.  “I told them we had rights and asked to make a phone call. But they told us, ‘You don’t have rights to anything’,” Francisco Galicia said. This is happening. [the screencapped tweets are in initial link] : Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 1/8 Yesterday, Francisco Galicia, a high school senior born in Dallas, TX called his mother for the first time after being released from nearly a month of illegal detainment in U.S. Concentration camps at the hands of CBP and ICE. He was held in "inhumane" conditions, he told me. South Texas 566 Veterans Drive 3:02 PM Jul 24, 2019 Twitter for iPhone Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h Replying to @GaretBleir 2/8 Francisco, a U.s. born citizen, was detained by Border Patrol on June 27th at a checkpoint in Falfurrias, Texas while driving with his friends on their way to a college soccer scouting event. At the checkpoint, he showed Border Patrol agents proof of his birth in the U... 1 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 3/8 he had on him - his Texas State ID, his wallet-sized birth certificate, and his social security card, but the agents told him they believed the documents weren't real, his attorney told me. For the entire three weeks he was held captive in CBP custody, Francisco was not... 1 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 4/8 allowed to use the phone, even for calls to his attorney or to his mother who feared he would be deported. It wasn't until Saturday, after being transferred to ICE custody, that he was allowed to make a collect phone call. 3 1 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 5/8 Despite multiple attempts by family members and his attorney to give further proof of his U.S. citizenship, it wasn't until the attorney took this to the news media and grassroots activists throughout Texas that ICE finally released Francisco, she says. 1 t 1 4 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 6/8 The attorney was told that she would have to present the documents to ICE officials upon arrival at South Texas Detention Complex in Pearsall, TX but after a handful of activists and reporters arrived at the detention facility... 9 1 3 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 7/8. we watched as ICE officials released Francisco without even speaking to the attorney. This further shows that the officials not only had the proper documentation for his release, they also knew that they had the proper documentation and that he was a U.S. citizen. 1 t 2 5 Garet Bleir @GaretBleir 21h 8/8 I'll be sharing more updates soon, along with videos and photos showing what happened while we were there as soon as possible. Photo: Garet Bleir - Journalism arctic-hands: swan2swan: swan2swan: If you haven’t seen this story, look up his name: Francisco Galicia.  Expect to see him come 2020, when the debates begin and the political battle heats up. Expect to see him in a suit testifying in court, or before Congress. This young man is a witness and a victim, and the fact that this isn’t a more prominent story on every news station is what truly frightens me. From The Dallas News: Galicia says he lost 26 pounds during that time in a South Texas immigrant detention center because officers didn’t provide him with enough food. He said he wasn’t allowed to shower and his skin was dry and dirty. He and 60 other men were crammed into an overcrowded holding area where they slept on the floor and were given only aluminum-foil blankets, he said. Some men had to sleep on the restroom area floor. Ticks bit some of the men and some were very sick, Galicia said. But many were afraid to ask to go to the doctor because CBP officers told them their stay would start over if they did, he said. I would remind you that concentration camps are actually real.  “I told them we had rights and asked to make a phone call. But they told us, ‘You don’t have rights to anything’,” Francisco Galicia said. This is happening. [the screencapped tweets are in initial link]

arctic-hands: swan2swan: swan2swan: If you haven’t seen this story, look up his name: Francisco Galicia.  Expect to see him come 2020,...

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ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people. : ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people.
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witchesandfairytales: geardrops: gahdamnpunk: People really think it’s an easy process. It’s hella expensive too here’s a handy chart if you don’t know how hard this process is As someone who was lucky enough to become a legal in the US I can say it’s so fucking expensive, close to $10,000. So much paper work, So many medicals and interviews. There were times when I felt like giving up. I feel so sorry for people like this who aren’t lucky enough to have to money to do such a thing. PS. The $10,000 was for the green card and medicals. If I want a full citizenship it’s another $5,000. : People of Earth Follow @StoriesOfPeople Man comforts his son before being deported to Mexico after 16 years in the US RESTRICTIO AREA 23 Jul 2017 4:59 PM 8,857 Retweets 33,768 Likes serg @iitaintralphtho Follow To the people who commented he had time to get legalized.. it took my dad 23 year.. 23 fucken years to get papers. Váyanse alv with those ignorant ass comments People of Earth @StoriesOfPeople Man comforts his son before being deported to Mexico after 16 years in the US 2:01 PM 23 May 2018 26,681 Retweets 71,621 Likes witchesandfairytales: geardrops: gahdamnpunk: People really think it’s an easy process. It’s hella expensive too here’s a handy chart if you don’t know how hard this process is As someone who was lucky enough to become a legal in the US I can say it’s so fucking expensive, close to $10,000. So much paper work, So many medicals and interviews. There were times when I felt like giving up. I feel so sorry for people like this who aren’t lucky enough to have to money to do such a thing. PS. The $10,000 was for the green card and medicals. If I want a full citizenship it’s another $5,000.
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