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Famous last words: someoneintheshadow456 The Last Words Of Famous Writers dali-dayvdreams When you've dedicated your life to words, it's important to go out eloquently 1. Ernest Hemingway: "Goodnight my kitten." Spoken to his wife before he killed himself 2. Jane Austen: I want nothing but death." In response to her sister, Cassandra, who was asking her if she wanted anything 3. J.M Barrie: " can't sleep." 4. L. Frank Baum: 'Now I can cross the shifting sands." 5. Edgar Allan Poe: "Lord help my poor soul. 6. Thomas Hobbes: "l am about to take my last voyage, a great leap into the dark," 7. Alfred Jarry: "I am dying... please, bring me a toothpick. 8. Hunter S. Thompson: "Relax this won't hurt 9. Henrik lbsen: "On the contrary!" 10. Anton Chekhov: "I haven't had champagne for a long time. 11. Mark Twain: "Good bye. If we meetSpoken to his daughter Clara 12. Louisa May Alcott: "ls it not meningitis?" Alcott did not have meningitis, though she believed it to be so. She died from mercury poison. 13. Jean Cocteau: "Since the day of my birth, my death began its 14. Washington Irving: "I have to set my pillows one more night, 15. Leo Tolstoy: "But the peasants... how do the peasants die?" walk. It is walking towards me, without hurrying." when will this end already?" 16. Hans Christian Andersen: "Don't ask me how I am! I understand nothing more." 17. Charles Dickens: "On the ground!" He suffered a stroke outside his home and was asking to be laid on the ground 18. H.G. Wells: "Go away! I'm all right." He didn't know he was in 19. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: "More light. 20. W.C. Fields: "Goddamn the whole fucking world and everyone in it except you, Carlotta!" "Carlotta" was Carlotta Monti, actress and his mistress 21. Voltaire: "Now, now, my good man, this is no time for making enemies." When asked by a priest to renounce Satan 22. Dylan Thomas: "I've had 18 straight whiskies... think that's the record. 23. George Bernard Shaw: "Dying is easy, comedy is hard 24. Henry David Thoreau: "Moose... Indian." 25. James Joyce: "Does nobody understand?" 26. Oscar Wilde: "Either the wallpaper goes, or I do." 27. Bob Hope: "Surprise me." He was responding to his wife asking where he wanted to be buried 28. Roald Dahl's last words are commonly believed to be "you know, I'm not frightened. It's just that I will miss you all so much!" which are the perfect last words. But, after he appeared to fall unconscious, a nurse injected him with morphine to ease his passing. His actual last words were a whispered "ow, fuck" 29. Salvador Dali hoped his last words would be "l do not believe in my death, but instead, they were actually, "Where is my clock?" 30. Emily Dickinson: " must go in, the fog is rising." vintage-mist Tag yourself. I'm HG Wells someoneintheshadow446 I'm James Joyce hummingbirdbandit No, but no one is explaining lbsen!! He had been really fucking sick for days, and woke up from a feverish night. His nurse? Wife? Asked him if he was feeling better. He smiled, said "On the contrary!" And died Supreme power move from my man lbsen Source: dali-daydreams #henrik ibsen #dying words 46,086 notes Mar 17th, 2018 Famous last words
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Famous last words: someoneintheshadow456 The Last Words Of Famous Writers dali-dayvdreams When you've dedicated your life to words, it's important to go out eloquently 1. Ernest Hemingway: "Goodnight my kitten." Spoken to his wife before he killed himself 2. Jane Austen: I want nothing but death." In response to her sister, Cassandra, who was asking her if she wanted anything 3. J.M Barrie: " can't sleep." 4. L. Frank Baum: 'Now I can cross the shifting sands." 5. Edgar Allan Poe: "Lord help my poor soul. 6. Thomas Hobbes: "l am about to take my last voyage, a great leap into the dark," 7. Alfred Jarry: "I am dying... please, bring me a toothpick. 8. Hunter S. Thompson: "Relax this won't hurt 9. Henrik lbsen: "On the contrary!" 10. Anton Chekhov: "I haven't had champagne for a long time. 11. Mark Twain: "Good bye. If we meetSpoken to his daughter Clara 12. Louisa May Alcott: "ls it not meningitis?" Alcott did not have meningitis, though she believed it to be so. She died from mercury poison. 13. Jean Cocteau: "Since the day of my birth, my death began its 14. Washington Irving: "I have to set my pillows one more night, 15. Leo Tolstoy: "But the peasants... how do the peasants die?" walk. It is walking towards me, without hurrying." when will this end already?" 16. Hans Christian Andersen: "Don't ask me how I am! I understand nothing more." 17. Charles Dickens: "On the ground!" He suffered a stroke outside his home and was asking to be laid on the ground 18. H.G. Wells: "Go away! I'm all right." He didn't know he was in 19. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: "More light. 20. W.C. Fields: "Goddamn the whole fucking world and everyone in it except you, Carlotta!" "Carlotta" was Carlotta Monti, actress and his mistress 21. Voltaire: "Now, now, my good man, this is no time for making enemies." When asked by a priest to renounce Satan 22. Dylan Thomas: "I've had 18 straight whiskies... think that's the record. 23. George Bernard Shaw: "Dying is easy, comedy is hard 24. Henry David Thoreau: "Moose... Indian." 25. James Joyce: "Does nobody understand?" 26. Oscar Wilde: "Either the wallpaper goes, or I do." 27. Bob Hope: "Surprise me." He was responding to his wife asking where he wanted to be buried 28. Roald Dahl's last words are commonly believed to be "you know, I'm not frightened. It's just that I will miss you all so much!" which are the perfect last words. But, after he appeared to fall unconscious, a nurse injected him with morphine to ease his passing. His actual last words were a whispered "ow, fuck" 29. Salvador Dali hoped his last words would be "l do not believe in my death, but instead, they were actually, "Where is my clock?" 30. Emily Dickinson: " must go in, the fog is rising." vintage-mist Tag yourself. I'm HG Wells someoneintheshadow446 I'm James Joyce hummingbirdbandit No, but no one is explaining lbsen!! He had been really fucking sick for days, and woke up from a feverish night. His nurse? Wife? Asked him if he was feeling better. He smiled, said "On the contrary!" And died Supreme power move from my man lbsen Source: dali-daydreams #henrik ibsen #dying words 46,086 notes Mar 17th, 2018 Famous last words
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<p>Her cat was named what&hellip;? <a href="http://ift.tt/1wgscB0">http://ift.tt/1wgscB0</a></p>: Behind the scenes . Evanna shares her middle name with Professor Sybill Trelawney. . Evanna also has the same surname as Aidan Lynch, the Seeker who played Quidditch for the lrish National - Evanna named her cats after Harry Potter characters: she has a cat named Luna and one - She is a frequent visitor to the Harry Potter fan site MuggleNet, and she once called in to the popular Harry - Evanna likes making beaded jewelery. She made the radish earrings that -Evanna Lynch revealed in a special feature on the Half-Blood Prince DVD Quidditch team. Coincidentally, Evanna is also Irish. named Crookshanks She also had another cat named Dumbledore, now deceased Potter podcast, PotterCast and later on MuggleCast her character wears in Order of the Phoenix herself 10] with Jany Temime that she also made a bracelet worn by Luna when she attended the Slug Club Christmas Party. The bracelet depicted a hare, like her Patronus, but it was believed that it was a reindeer. It took Evanna about 45 minutes to make it, and she stated it wasn't, nor did it need to be, perfect, since Luna was like that. Jany jokingly asked her, "Are you going to tell me that if it was not for Luna you would have made it better than that?" to which Evanna simply responded, "Perhaps. . She attended both the London and Irish premières of Order of the Phoenix. - She was given a hare and moon pendant by J. K. Rowling - At the James Joyce Awards in Dublin when asked, "Do you think about the Like this? You'll hate MIGGLENET MEMES.COM <p>Her cat was named what&hellip;? <a href="http://ift.tt/1wgscB0">http://ift.tt/1wgscB0</a></p>

<p>Her cat was named what&hellip;? <a href="http://ift.tt/1wgscB0">http://ift.tt/1wgscB0</a></p>

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amandaonwriting: The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much from teaching novelists to dream their books into life. After seeing more than 130 graduates published, I have identified these as being the most common mistakes made by debut writers.  Beginner writers all want to write their life story in the form of a novel. Almost every writer who comes through the school thinks they have a life story so compelling that an editor won’t be able to resist it. Starting a query letter with, ‘This novel is based on my life,’ means the dreaded slush pile! Even if your mother sold you to gypsies to feed her heroin habit, or your father let his father molest you, your story is not unique. I promise you they’ve heard it all. See a therapist. Then write a novel. Or write a memoir. But learn how to do it so that it is not an indulgence. Chris van Wyk’s Shirley, Goodness Mercy, Alexandra Fuller’s Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight and Peter Godwin’s Mukiwa are good examples of memoirs. Beginners have no antagonist. If you develop well-constructed protagonists and antagonists, who SPEAK and ARGUE and FIGHT, you will be able to write a book. How can you write a novel, which is generally 360 pages long, without a villain? Who will your hero fight to achieve his goal? The other characters – love interests and friends - are not important for the plot. They are important to show a protagonist’s life, goals, motivations, and feelings without you telling your reader what they are.  Beginner writers have no plot. Beginner writers either stop at about 20 000 words or carry on until they reach 120 000 or more! Most novels are 80 000 words. Either way, these writers don’t have a plot. Most first time authors ramble on philosophically until they have told the story. They are writing an essay, not a novel. This is called telling. Never tell. Beginners do not have enough dialogue. In modern fiction you have to show. The narrator style of writing has all but disappeared. One way to get around this problem is to use dialogue. Modern novels contain 60-70% dialogue. I suggest that writers make friends with this writing tool.  Beginner writers hang on to an idea for a novel that is no longer popular. All writers have a story from long ago, mostly high school, which they won’t let go. I ask these writers to go to their nearest good bookshop and look at the new releases. I tell them to do some research on Amazon. Would their book fit in either of these places? Family sagas written by authors like Barbara Taylor Bradford in the 1980s do not sell now. Nor do cosy mysteries a la Agatha Christie, or historical adventures like those written by Wilbur Smith – unless you are Wilbur Smith. These writers need to let go, do some research and write fiction that readers want to read, and that publishers will buy.  Why I believe in Writers Write  I have watched people struggle as they decide whether or not they need to attend a writing course. After many rejections and lots of reflection, they join.  Writing teachers and mentors, and writing courses, have been popular for longer than most people know.  Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) lectures creative writing, as do Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone) and Janet Fitch (White Oleander). South African writers like Andre Brink and J.M. Coetzee have lectured creative writing. When I interviewed Marina Lewycka (A Short History of Tractors in the Ukranian) she revealed that a writing course was her secret to becoming published. Charlaine Harris was discovered on a writing course. Writing support groups have also helped many writers. Consider Gertrude Stein, who sacrificed much of her own career to mentor the likes of F Scott Fitzgerald, T S Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway.  Don’t ever be afraid to learn. The most successful novelists have always looked for help when they’ve needed it.  I hope this helps. If you want to enrol on Amanda’s course, Writers Write, email neo@writerswrite.co.za   by Amanda Patterson From Writers Write : The tive Most Common fiction Oriting mistakes amandaonwriting: The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much from teaching novelists to dream their books into life. After seeing more than 130 graduates published, I have identified these as being the most common mistakes made by debut writers.  Beginner writers all want to write their life story in the form of a novel. Almost every writer who comes through the school thinks they have a life story so compelling that an editor won’t be able to resist it. Starting a query letter with, ‘This novel is based on my life,’ means the dreaded slush pile! Even if your mother sold you to gypsies to feed her heroin habit, or your father let his father molest you, your story is not unique. I promise you they’ve heard it all. See a therapist. Then write a novel. Or write a memoir. But learn how to do it so that it is not an indulgence. Chris van Wyk’s Shirley, Goodness Mercy, Alexandra Fuller’s Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight and Peter Godwin’s Mukiwa are good examples of memoirs. Beginners have no antagonist. If you develop well-constructed protagonists and antagonists, who SPEAK and ARGUE and FIGHT, you will be able to write a book. How can you write a novel, which is generally 360 pages long, without a villain? Who will your hero fight to achieve his goal? The other characters – love interests and friends - are not important for the plot. They are important to show a protagonist’s life, goals, motivations, and feelings without you telling your reader what they are.  Beginner writers have no plot. Beginner writers either stop at about 20 000 words or carry on until they reach 120 000 or more! Most novels are 80 000 words. Either way, these writers don’t have a plot. Most first time authors ramble on philosophically until they have told the story. They are writing an essay, not a novel. This is called telling. Never tell. Beginners do not have enough dialogue. In modern fiction you have to show. The narrator style of writing has all but disappeared. One way to get around this problem is to use dialogue. Modern novels contain 60-70% dialogue. I suggest that writers make friends with this writing tool.  Beginner writers hang on to an idea for a novel that is no longer popular. All writers have a story from long ago, mostly high school, which they won’t let go. I ask these writers to go to their nearest good bookshop and look at the new releases. I tell them to do some research on Amazon. Would their book fit in either of these places? Family sagas written by authors like Barbara Taylor Bradford in the 1980s do not sell now. Nor do cosy mysteries a la Agatha Christie, or historical adventures like those written by Wilbur Smith – unless you are Wilbur Smith. These writers need to let go, do some research and write fiction that readers want to read, and that publishers will buy.  Why I believe in Writers Write  I have watched people struggle as they decide whether or not they need to attend a writing course. After many rejections and lots of reflection, they join.  Writing teachers and mentors, and writing courses, have been popular for longer than most people know.  Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) lectures creative writing, as do Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone) and Janet Fitch (White Oleander). South African writers like Andre Brink and J.M. Coetzee have lectured creative writing. When I interviewed Marina Lewycka (A Short History of Tractors in the Ukranian) she revealed that a writing course was her secret to becoming published. Charlaine Harris was discovered on a writing course. Writing support groups have also helped many writers. Consider Gertrude Stein, who sacrificed much of her own career to mentor the likes of F Scott Fitzgerald, T S Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway.  Don’t ever be afraid to learn. The most successful novelists have always looked for help when they’ve needed it.  I hope this helps. If you want to enrol on Amanda’s course, Writers Write, email neo@writerswrite.co.za   by Amanda Patterson From Writers Write

amandaonwriting: The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much...

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