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ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people. : ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people.
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jeza-red: kaijuno: bigtuna108: naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmythejiver: thecringeandwincefactory: wonderdave: The whole Pepsi commercial thing reminded me that people always mis-remember the famous flower in the gun barrel photo as being a young woman. It wasn’t. The photo, taken by Bernie Boston, is of George Edgerly Harris III better known by his stage name Hibiscus. He was a member of the San Francisco based radical gay liberation theater troupe the Cockettes. He died of AIDS in 1982 at the time AIDS was still referred to by the name GRID which stood for Gay Related Immuno-Deficiency. The photo was taken at a protest at the Pentagon.  I had no idea who he was, thank you. This is one example of the Mandela Effect phenomena, where an iconic moment is reenacted with a hippy woman so many times that people think that’s the story and thus another gay man is written out of history. Thanks for the photo. I had no idea. Wow. This photo was taken by Bernie Boston, a black/native man who willingly stood up to a chapter of the KKK and earned their respect among other things I get the subject is important, but please dont erase Bernie. I knew him personally and he deserves to be remembered and by only remembering the subject, a white man, you erase a black man. @vaspider could you reblog this version too, please? I am deeply upset by Bernie’s erasure from his own work. Reblogging for credit to the photographer, and so I can look up his work on desktop later. I think the reason some people think it was a woman who put the flower in the Gun barrel is because of this picture taken at the same protest Yeah lmao “the Mandela effect in action” no there’s just two different pictures plot thickens :O: jeza-red: kaijuno: bigtuna108: naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmythejiver: thecringeandwincefactory: wonderdave: The whole Pepsi commercial thing reminded me that people always mis-remember the famous flower in the gun barrel photo as being a young woman. It wasn’t. The photo, taken by Bernie Boston, is of George Edgerly Harris III better known by his stage name Hibiscus. He was a member of the San Francisco based radical gay liberation theater troupe the Cockettes. He died of AIDS in 1982 at the time AIDS was still referred to by the name GRID which stood for Gay Related Immuno-Deficiency. The photo was taken at a protest at the Pentagon.  I had no idea who he was, thank you. This is one example of the Mandela Effect phenomena, where an iconic moment is reenacted with a hippy woman so many times that people think that’s the story and thus another gay man is written out of history. Thanks for the photo. I had no idea. Wow. This photo was taken by Bernie Boston, a black/native man who willingly stood up to a chapter of the KKK and earned their respect among other things I get the subject is important, but please dont erase Bernie. I knew him personally and he deserves to be remembered and by only remembering the subject, a white man, you erase a black man. @vaspider could you reblog this version too, please? I am deeply upset by Bernie’s erasure from his own work. Reblogging for credit to the photographer, and so I can look up his work on desktop later. I think the reason some people think it was a woman who put the flower in the Gun barrel is because of this picture taken at the same protest Yeah lmao “the Mandela effect in action” no there’s just two different pictures plot thickens :O

jeza-red: kaijuno: bigtuna108: naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmy...

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naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmythejiver: thecringeandwincefactory: wonderdave: The whole Pepsi commercial thing reminded me that people always mis-remember the famous flower in the gun barrel photo as being a young woman. It wasn’t. The photo, taken by Bernie Boston, is of George Edgerly Harris III better known by his stage name Hibiscus. He was a member of the San Francisco based radical gay liberation theater troupe the Cockettes. He died of AIDS in 1982 at the time AIDS was still referred to by the name GRID which stood for Gay Related Immuno-Deficiency. The photo was taken at a protest at the Pentagon.  I had no idea who he was, thank you. This is one example of the Mandela Effect phenomena, where an iconic moment is reenacted with a hippy woman so many times that people think that’s the story and thus another gay man is written out of history. Thanks for the photo. I had no idea. Wow. This photo was taken by Bernie Boston, a black/native man who willingly stood up to a chapter of the KKK and earned their respect among other things I get the subject is important, but please dont erase Bernie. I knew him personally and he deserves to be remembered and by only remembering the subject, a white man, you erase a black man. @vaspider could you reblog this version too, please? I am deeply upset by Bernie’s erasure from his own work. Reblogging for credit to the photographer, and so I can look up his work on desktop later. : naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmythejiver: thecringeandwincefactory: wonderdave: The whole Pepsi commercial thing reminded me that people always mis-remember the famous flower in the gun barrel photo as being a young woman. It wasn’t. The photo, taken by Bernie Boston, is of George Edgerly Harris III better known by his stage name Hibiscus. He was a member of the San Francisco based radical gay liberation theater troupe the Cockettes. He died of AIDS in 1982 at the time AIDS was still referred to by the name GRID which stood for Gay Related Immuno-Deficiency. The photo was taken at a protest at the Pentagon.  I had no idea who he was, thank you. This is one example of the Mandela Effect phenomena, where an iconic moment is reenacted with a hippy woman so many times that people think that’s the story and thus another gay man is written out of history. Thanks for the photo. I had no idea. Wow. This photo was taken by Bernie Boston, a black/native man who willingly stood up to a chapter of the KKK and earned their respect among other things I get the subject is important, but please dont erase Bernie. I knew him personally and he deserves to be remembered and by only remembering the subject, a white man, you erase a black man. @vaspider could you reblog this version too, please? I am deeply upset by Bernie’s erasure from his own work. Reblogging for credit to the photographer, and so I can look up his work on desktop later.

naamahdarling: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: catsandwitchcraft: kristina-meister: jimmythejiver: thecringeandwincefactory...

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charliehadalittlewolf: tuhhveit: elsiesmarina: themightyquinn666: sorry everyone Excuse me. One of the first women to start her own independent production company. Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles. Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to. Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image. Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting. Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando. Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself. Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s.  One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse. One of the first people to openly support gay rights. Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation. Donated her time and money to these charities. Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there. Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans. Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model?  marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there and let’s not forget this Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again. “She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.“ - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe : mode charliehadalittlewolf: tuhhveit: elsiesmarina: themightyquinn666: sorry everyone Excuse me. One of the first women to start her own independent production company. Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles. Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to. Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image. Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting. Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando. Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself. Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s.  One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse. One of the first people to openly support gay rights. Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation. Donated her time and money to these charities. Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there. Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans. Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model?  marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there and let’s not forget this Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again. “She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.“ - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

charliehadalittlewolf: tuhhveit: elsiesmarina: themightyquinn666: sorry everyone Excuse me. One of the first women to start her own...

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