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captain-snark: ohdionne: So Minnesotans showed the fuck up tonight (like we do) - thousands in the street protesting tr*mp’s latest executive disorders. And guess what happened? The old proverb “What if an emergency vehicle needs to get where it’s going” came to life, and the sea went silent and parted to allow it through (swiftly…literally the truck was going about as fast as, if not faster than, it would have been if there had been cars it needed to go around). Please share this. This was a rare occurrence where an emergency vehicle needed to go through the route of a protest, when usually they have predetermined alternative routes, and it went completely fine. Also for the love of god, have more respect for firefighters/EMTs…they know how to do their jobs. They’re ready for anything, including working around protests. So folks can stop using that tired old argument now (not that it was ever backed up by sources anyway). It’s almost as though these protesters who are protesting for human rights are decent human people. : Jared 2 hrs please tell me someone got a video of the fire truck moving swiftly and safely through thousands of protestors tonight you know, for all of the "concerned citizens" at home You, Rick d 20 others 2 Comments 1 Share Like Share Comment THROWBACK NIGHT OLD SCHOOLAPROV Speak Out Against Adam Iverson Muslim Ban! 17 mins For the people who complain about emergency vehicles being blocked: GVE MEY AdamlversonPhotography captain-snark: ohdionne: So Minnesotans showed the fuck up tonight (like we do) - thousands in the street protesting tr*mp’s latest executive disorders. And guess what happened? The old proverb “What if an emergency vehicle needs to get where it’s going” came to life, and the sea went silent and parted to allow it through (swiftly…literally the truck was going about as fast as, if not faster than, it would have been if there had been cars it needed to go around). Please share this. This was a rare occurrence where an emergency vehicle needed to go through the route of a protest, when usually they have predetermined alternative routes, and it went completely fine. Also for the love of god, have more respect for firefighters/EMTs…they know how to do their jobs. They’re ready for anything, including working around protests. So folks can stop using that tired old argument now (not that it was ever backed up by sources anyway). It’s almost as though these protesters who are protesting for human rights are decent human people.
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sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source) : sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source)
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sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source) : sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source)
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sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source) : sartorialadventure: cestriankiwi: josef-tribbiani: bigwordsandsharpedges: The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.  The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each person, and distinct from European tattoos that mimic that traditional style. There arent many pictures non combat related that look this badass Actually most Tā moko are done with modern tattoo equipment these days, but some people get them done the traditional way. And, as others have said, they’re not for Non- Māori, as they have specific meanings and significance. If you want a tattoo with Māori style, you can get a kirituhi. These avoid any designs associated with particular tribes or famous people you’re not related to. Kirituhi is a Māori style tattoo either made by a non-Māori tattooer, or made for a non-Māori wearer. Kirituhi has mana of it’s own and is a design telling the unique story of the wearer in the visual language of Māori art and design. Kiri means ‘skin’, and tuhi means ‘to write, draw, record, adorn or decorate with painting’.Kirituhi is not restricted to only Māori people, and it is a way for Māori to share our cultural arts with people from around the world in a respectful manner, and for non-Māori artists to enjoy our beautiful art form as well. I happily do kirituhi for my clients around the world and it is a privilege to do such work for them.Kirituhi is no lesser an artform than moko, however it is different and I believe these differences must be acknowledged and respected, so that the integrity of our taonga Māori – moko, is maintained around the world. Moko is uniquely Māori and it is strictly reserved to be done by Māori, for Māori.If either the recipient or tattooer do not have Māori whakapapa, then the resulting design is a Māori Style tattoo or kirituhi, NOT moko. The word moko originated from the Māori atua (god) of volcanic activity and earthquakes, Rūaumoko – therefore the origin of tā moko is divine and sacred – to me this is no small thing, nor should it be dismissed. As my mentor once told me, ‘moko is about 99% culture, and 1% tattoo’. (source)
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srsfunny: These Were Actually Answered By First Graders: A 1st grade school teacher had twenty-six students in her class. She presented each child in her classroom the 1st half of a well-known proverb and asked them to come up with the remainder of the proverb. It's hard to believe these were actually done by first graders. Don't change horses until they stop running bug is closc Daylight Saving Time termites. how? looks dirty impossible Mr math 2. ¡Strike while the . It's always darkest before 4 Never underestimate the power of You can lcad a horse to water but Don't bite the hand that 7. No news is miss is as good as a You can't teach an old dog new o. If you lie down with dogs, you'll 11. Lovc all, trust 12. 13. An idle mind is 14. Where there's smoke thcre's 5. Happy the bride who 16. A penny saved is stink in the morning mc the best way to rclax ution s all the presents not much he Muskctccrs. 19. Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and you have to blow your nosc. 20. There are none so blind as 21. Children should be seen and not Stevic Wonder 22.fat first you don't succccd 23. You get out of something only what you 24. When the blind ead the blind 25.A bird in thc hand And the WINNER and last one! 26. Better late than get new batteries. cc in thc picturc on the box get out of the way. is going to poop on you. pregnant you should probably go to TheMetaPicture.com srsfunny: These Were Actually Answered By First Graders

srsfunny: These Were Actually Answered By First Graders

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srsfunny:These Were Actually Answered By First Graders: A 1st grade school teacher had twenty-six students in her class. She presented each child in her classroom the 1st half of a well-known proverb and asked them to come up with the remainder of the proverb. It's hard to believe these were actually done by first graders. Don't change horses until they stop running bug is closc Daylight Saving Time termites. how? looks dirty impossible Mr math 2. ¡Strike while the . It's always darkest before 4 Never underestimate the power of You can lcad a horse to water but Don't bite the hand that 7. No news is miss is as good as a You can't teach an old dog new o. If you lie down with dogs, you'll 11. Lovc all, trust 12. 13. An idle mind is 14. Where there's smoke thcre's 5. Happy the bride who 16. A penny saved is stink in the morning mc the best way to rclax ution s all the presents not much he Muskctccrs. 19. Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and you have to blow your nosc. 20. There are none so blind as 21. Children should be seen and not Stevic Wonder 22.fat first you don't succccd 23. You get out of something only what you 24. When the blind ead the blind 25.A bird in thc hand And the WINNER and last one! 26. Better late than get new batteries. cc in thc picturc on the box get out of the way. is going to poop on you. pregnant you should probably go to TheMetaPicture.com srsfunny:These Were Actually Answered By First Graders

srsfunny:These Were Actually Answered By First Graders

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