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America, Cars, and Computers: Lee Fang @lhfang When robotics/driverless cars replace 1/3 jobs in America, and the political establishment does nothing, 2016 anger will look minuscule. 11/5/16, 10:03 PM 287 RETWEETS 497 LIKES c-bassmeow: cracked-pearl-78: c-bassmeow: Shit Luddites have been making this claim since the Industrial Revolution and they are no closer to being true. While you are historically correct, many economists, tech experts (people who work with tech who are far from luddites), and even CEO’s of tech companies believe that with the increasing automation  of jobs, many jobs will go to machines and there will be a great, massive reduction in jobs. Economists both from the left and right think this is to be true since it’s already happening just not to a large extent YET. Even the Bureau of labor statistics projects massive job loss due to human jobs becoming obsolete because technological changes that make it more efficient to replace humans with machines/computers since it will be cheaper, less error, and more efficient to replace humans since machines do not need to rest, do not have families, can be worked to their extreme, and can be programmed to do something correctly all the time. Moreover with the prospect of artificial intelligence which is being invested heavily, the change might manifest more rapidly.  One remedy for this from some economists from both the left and right is to enact a universal basic income. But while I appreciate your skepticism, which is very healthy because i too have a disdain for predictions with no basis in reality or that sound alarmist- to my knowledge there seems to be a slow, growing consensus from many fields that technological progress will replace many many human jobs the extent to which they will replace them is obviously debatable but the fact that they will be replaced to some degree that affects us seems to not be. I’m sorry I can’t cite sources I’m on my phone at the moment. Also,  throughout history technological progress has always replaced jobs.  There are less shoemakers now, farmers, cashiers, and countless other positions due to technological progress. Historically though,  we have been able to replace these jobs with new ones created through social change, technological change, and other factors but I and many think that we have hit a special time in history where technology will simply take over many more jobs than we can replace.  Technological progress is so advanced now that many products that we had to buy separately are now consolidated into one (an iphone is a fax machine, a phone, a computer, a camera, a tv, etc) and at times less people are needed in the aggregate to make these products.   Lastly, and this is just semantics,  I do believe that many techno-optimists believe technological progress automatically means “good” because we associate the word technology with human advancement and because “progress” is  a word that assumes benevolence, but this is not the case. Technological and scientific progress are not inherently good.  I am no luddite and I am a lover of science BUT science and technological advancement are sometimes removed and unaware of the unintended consequences created by their advancement since we rarely know all the social, economic, political, ramifications brought by said technology/scientific discoveries at the time of their creation and birth. So to assume everything will be a positive step forward is a naive assumption not supported by data but simply a subjective feeling of comfort and happiness because tech progress is being made. So i am no luddite, but I do think there is cause this time to be healthily afraid of what is to come.  A capitalist system has historically relied on humans but when those who own the means of production switch to a more inexpensive, rational, hard working, and anti-error prone substitute …. then what happens? It has never been done before so to assume you can use history as a guide (which is usually a very intelligent move) is somewhat misguided for what is to come has never happened before. 
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America, Cars, and Computers: Lee Fang @lhfang When robotics/driverless cars replace 1/3 jobs in America, and the political establishment does nothing, 2016 anger will look minuscule. 11/5/16, 10:03 PM 287 RETWEETS 497 LIKES cracked-pearl-78: c-bassmeow: Shit Luddites have been making this claim since the Industrial Revolution and they are no closer to being true. While you are historically correct, many economists, tech experts (people who work with tech who are far from luddites), and even CEO’s of tech companies believe that with the increasing automation  of jobs, many jobs will go to machines and there will be a great, massive reduction in jobs. Economists both from the left and right think this is to be true since it’s already happening just not to a large extent YET. Even the Bureau of labor statistics projects massive job loss due to human jobs becoming obsolete because technological changes that make it more efficient to replace humans with machines/computers since it will be cheaper, less error, and more efficient to replace humans since machines do not need to rest, do not have families, can be worked to their extreme, and can be programmed to do something correctly all the time. Moreover with the prospect of artificial intelligence which is being invested heavily, the change might manifest more rapidly. One remedy for this from some economists from both the left and right is to enact a universal basic income. But while I appreciate your skepticism, which is very healthy because i too have a disdain for predictions with no basis in reality or that sound alarmist- to my knowledge there seems to be a slow, growing consensus from many fields that technological progress will replace many many human jobs the extent to which they will replace them is obviously debatable but the fact that they will be replaced to some degree that affects us seems to not be. I’m sorry I can’t cite sources I’m on my phone at the moment.Also,  throughout history technological progress has always replaced jobs.  There are less shoemakers now, farmers, cashiers, and countless other positions due to technological progress. Historically though,  we have been able to replace these jobs with new ones created through social change, technological change, and other factors but I and many think that we have hit a special time in history where technology will simply take over many more jobs than we can replace.  Technological progress is so advanced now that many products that we had to buy separately are now consolidated into one (an iphone is a fax machine, a phone, a computer, a camera, a tv, etc) and at times less people are needed in the aggregate to make these products.  Lastly, and this is just semantics,  I do believe that many techno-optimists believe technological progress automatically means “good” because we associate the word technology with human advancement and because “progress” is  a word that assumes benevolence, but this is not the case. Technological and scientific progress are not inherently good.  I am no luddite and I am a lover of science BUT science and technological advancement are sometimes removed and unaware of the unintended consequences created by their advancement since we rarely know all the social, economic, political, ramifications brought by said technology/scientific discoveries at the time of their creation and birth. So to assume everything will be a positive step forward is a naive assumption not supported by data but simply a subjective feeling of comfort and happiness because tech progress is being made. So i am no luddite, but I do think there is cause this time to be healthily afraid of what is to come.  A capitalist system has historically relied on humans but when those who own the means of production switch to a more inexpensive, rational, hard working, and anti-error prone substitute …. then what happens? It has never been done before so to assume you can use history as a guide (which is usually a very intelligent move) is somewhat misguided for what is to come has never happened before. 
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College, Driving, and Pizza: TIRED OF SEEING THIS? Even if everyone worked hard and went to college, someone would still need to make our pizzas, stock our shelves, drive our cabs. Quit looking down on them and assuming they deserve to l poverty ive i XFACEBOOK.COM/ WAC <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://gop-tea-pub.tumblr.com/post/147822139572">gop-tea-pub</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p> The Misleading Claim: “Even if everyone worked hard and went to college, someone would still need to make our pizza, stock our shelves, and drive our cabs. Quit looking down on them and assuming they deserve to live in poverty.”<br/><br/> The Rebuttal:<br/> The fatal error in the above claim is the presumption that demand for a specific job is static and will always exist; that there will always be someone making our pizzas, stocking our shelves, and driving us around in taxis. While this may have SOME truth to it, in that a declining occupation might not entirely disappear, it fails to acknowledge that such a decline in demand is precisely what necessitates the low wage in the first place. Understand, advocates of freer markets generally don’t assert that hard working individuals “deserve to live in poverty.” What we contend is that people earning low wages are typically offering labor that is either “low in demand” or “'high in supply.” The valuation characteristics of this labor, then, mirror that of a product few people wish to buy or too many people wish to sell.  <br/><br/> It just so happens that pizza-making, shelf-stocking, and cab-driving jobs are declining in demand.<br/><br/> ■ PIZZA-MAKERS:<br/> Pizza has gotten cheaper to produce. Per Franchise Direct, citing a pizza franchise industry report from 2010, “The development and implementation of new technology and marketing strategies has enabled the pizza industry to adapt to growing consumer demands for cheap, fast, and convenient products.” [1]  Part of this increased productivity means fewer “pizza makers” are required, as the art of pizza making has increasingly become commercialized into an efficient process which utilizes less labor. The major chains are known for utilizing “assembly line” techniques, relying more on pre-made or partially prepared products, shipped to individual shops, and thus requiring less labor to render a finished product. According to Pizza Marketing Quarterly, who issues an Annual Industry Analysis, in 2003, independently owned pizza shops represented 50.7% of sales for the pizza industry, while major corporate chains made up the remainder. [2] Ten years later, however, that number had fallen to 40.33% of sales, with major chains increasing their share to nearly 60%. [3] The point is clear; the increased share of major pizza chains equals a downward trend in the necessity of qualified pizza makers.<br/><br/> ■ STOCKING CLERKS:<br/> Per the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook and Career Guide to Industries, “Stocking Clerks” are on a list of the 30 fastest declining occupations, expected to decline by 7.7% over a decade. [4]<br/><br/> Other notable yet disappearing occupations from this list? [5]<br/><br/> ● Woodworkers - 40% decline<br/> ● Photo Process Workers -36.3%<br/> ● Textile Operators - 24-31%<br/> ● Clerks - 27.8%<br/> ● Computer Operators - 24.7%<br/> ● Bookbinders - 21.8%<br/> ● Radio Operators - 16.3%<br/> ● Gas Pump Operators - 17.5%<br/> ● Pharmacy Aides - 11.1%<br/> ● Shoe Workers - 10.3%<br/> ● Utility Meter Readers - 10.3%<br/> ● Printer Technicians - up to21.2%<br/> ● Projectionists – 8.4%<br/> ● Farmers – estimated 8.5% from 2006 to 2016<br/> *Matter of fact, from 1790 – 1990 the share of the labor force involved in farming declined from 90% to 2.6%. [6]<br/><br/> The point? Specific types of jobs aren’t always here to stay. Markets shift, demand changes, and the need for some jobs decline.<br/><br/> ■ TAXI DRIVERS:<br/> As with the above occupations, taxi drivers ALSO aren’t impervious to changing markets. Many are now deeply threatened by the quickly expanding “ride-sharing” alternatives, such as Uber. “Donna Blythe-Shaw, a representative for the United Steelworkers and the Boston Taxi Drivers Association, said cabbies, concerned they could be driven out of business by unregulated ride-sharing companies, have waited long enough for reform. She said business is down 35 to 40 percent as a result of companies such as Uber, Lyft, and SideCar.” [7] With such rapid declines in demand for taxis, would it really be surprising to find out their take-home pay has also declined?<br/><br/> CONCLUSION:<br/> Yes, in a hypothetical world, if EVERYONE went to college and developed additional skills, some of those college educated people WOULD still end up making pizzas, stocking shelves, and driving cabs, but it would - as always - be the least skilled among us who performed such tasks. And it just so happens that “pizza-maker,” “stocking clerk,” and “taxi driver,” are occupations with declining demand. Thus, their lower pay IS justified. Again, those choosing to offer labor which is either low in demand or high in supply position themselves to be on the lower end of the compensation spectrum. It’s THEIR choice not to change careers.  You can’t blame anyone else.<br/> —————————–<br/> Citations:<br/> [1]<br/><a href="http://www.franchisedirect.com/foodfranchises/pizzafranchises/pizzafranchiseindustryreport2010/80/275">http://www.franchisedirect.com/foodfranchises/pizzafranchises/pizzafranchiseindustryreport2010/80/275</a><br/><br/> [2]<br/><a href="http://www.pmq.com/September-October-2004/Pizza-Power/">http://www.pmq.com/September-October-2004/Pizza-Power/</a><br/><br/> [3]<br/><a href="http://www.pmq.com/December-2013/Pizza-Power-The-2014-Pizza-Power-Report/">http://www.pmq.com/December-2013/Pizza-Power-The-2014-Pizza-Power-Report/</a><br/><br/> [4] [5]<br/><a href="http://www.boston.com/jobs/2013/12/30/the-fastest-declining-occupations/PRZVnJg25iIBgJFyv70BxN/story.html#slide-2">http://www.boston.com/jobs/2013/12/30/the-fastest-declining-occupations/PRZVnJg25iIBgJFyv70BxN/story.html#slide-2</a><br/><br/> [6]<br/><a href="https://www.agclassroom.org/gan/timeline/farmers_land.htm">https://www.agclassroom.org/gan/timeline/farmers_land.htm</a><br/><br/> [7]<br/><a href="http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/05/22/taxi-drivers-protest-uber-boston-offices/0YlRN0hHAHVhcxFIQ2X5aI/story.html">http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/05/22/taxi-drivers-protest-uber-boston-offices/0YlRN0hHAHVhcxFIQ2X5aI/story.html</a> <br/></p> </blockquote>

gop-tea-pub: The Misleading Claim: “Even if everyone worked hard and went to college, someone would still need to make our pizza, stock ...

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