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Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Anaconda, Bodies , and Books: The most likely chemical in chocolate that might explain its feel-good effect is PEA, of which there can be up to 700 mg in a 100 g bar (0.7%). Most chocolate contains much less than this, and a more typical amount would be 50-100 mg. In its pure state PEA is an oily liquid with a fishlike smell, and it can be made in the laboratory from ammonia. (PEA has the curious property of absorbing carbon dioxide from the air.) When people are injected with PEA, the level of glucose in their blood goes up and so does their blood pressure. These effects combine to produce a feeling of well-being and alertness. PEA may trigger the release of dopamine, which is the brain chemical that makes us feel happy, in which case PEA would be acting in the same way as amphetamines such as ecstasy. PEA and ecstasy molecules are roughly the same shape and size, and this has led to the suggestion that they might work in the same way, but scientific proof is lacking that they do. Our own bodies produce tiny but detectable amounts of PEA naturally, and it is formed from an essential dietary amino acid called phenylalanine. The level of natural PEA varies and it increases when we are under stress. It is also higher than normal in schizophrenics and hyperactive children, but this is more likely to be a symptom of these conditions rather than their cause. Not everyone can cope with a sudden influx of PEA, which is why some people are sensitive to chocolate, often suffering a violent headache if they eat too much. This happens because the excess PEA constricts the walls of blood vessels in the brain. The human body has little use for PEA and employs an enzyme, monoamine oxidase, to dispose of it. People whose bodies are intolerant of chocolate appear to have difficulty making enough of the enzyme to prevent the PEA building up to levels that triggers migraines. symbisexual-disaster: Trying to learn more about chocolate and PEA, thought this was an interesting resource! Link In order to get his fix, Venom probably stops the MAO enzyme from getting rid of the PEA. Then he just sucks it up himself so that Eddie doesn’t get headaches. If I’m understanding this right, a chocolate-intolerant person would greatly benefit from bonding with a symbiote. Since chocolate-intolerants don’t make enough of the MAO enzyme, they need to either a) not eat chocolate ever if they don’t want a migraine or b) hook up with a symbiote that will slurp it up for them!  So it might be fun to write either Eddie or an OC who could never enjoy chocolate before, but after bonding, somehow is actually able to? Fun fun. 

symbisexual-disaster: Trying to learn more about chocolate and PEA, thought this was an interesting resource! Link In order to get his fix, ...