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America, Be Like, and Bless Up: Kirk, a female Border Collie, watching herself win the 2017 Purina Pro Challenge. DOG PLAN p3 Ain’t I been told y’all?! BYOBC. No, not bring your own bottle - bring ya own is bottle is cancelled stop drinking so damn much and enjoy the Thai food without the liquor cot dammit that curry is delicious on its own without the merlot but lemme not start, that’s for another day lmao. BYOBC mean Be Ya Own Biggest Cheerleader. U feel me? Always. Celebrate ya own success. Motivate YOURSELF. Ultimately among friends but even among family u gon have people cheering for you buuuuuuut NOT really cheering for u 😂. This ain’t bc they evil! They might be - like some of them - but mainly they probably just a lil tight that they ain’t having success like u. U feel me? That’s why u gotta watch out sometimes about bragging about ya accomplishments all on Facebook and LinkedIn like “truly humbled to humbly be awarded the 40 Under 40 in My [Extremely Specific Field of Work] in [Oddly Specific Geographic Region]”. U really humble bc u seem hella braggadocious right now no shots lol. Just keep some of that inside and be thankful to God and celebrate with yourself not bc u the sh!t but because u know that out of all the people that God could have rewarded for they hard work he chose you. “But smash I work 10x harder than all my friends, I deserve my success!” No. U deserve nothing. It’s Filipino workmen in Dubai right now building buildings in 120 degree heat to make a lil scratch to send home. THEY work harder than u. It’s just that u was born in America and they was born in the Philippines u get me! That’s why every time I pull an all nighter for work on a transaction, I remember that but for the Grace of God, I could be in Dubai on the 98th floor of a building working myself to death. May God always make us thankful and may he reward our hard work. Be ya own cheerleader beloveds! Bless up ❤️
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Amazon, Bad, and Dad: When the African Grey parrot N'kisi first met Jane Goodall, he recognized her from a photograph and asked "Got a chimp?" It is claimed that this was a possible display of a sense of humor. Cc Ultrafacts.tumblr.com larkiaquail: nuttyrabbit: outragedbird: theofficialvincenzo: countess7: buggery-approved: whatswrongwithblue: toshio-the-starman: onyx-san: siddharthasmama: angel-with-a-flower-crown: maggiemunkee: ultrafacts: Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts I read an anecdote from someone whose African Grey didn’t particularly get along with her Amazon parrot, Paco. One night she was preparing cornish hens for dinner, while the grey hung out with her in the kitchen. He got a closer look at one of the hens, looked his mama dead in the eyes and asked, “Paco?” Then he laughed. that is one sadistic bird  I am slightly afraid now. I love birds? African Grey Parrots are one of the smartest birds, and seems they can be known to play “jokes” or “pranks” on their owners or any visitors. I was visiting a friend of the family one time and I was just casually watching tv when I thought I heard the water running. I go into the kitchen but everything’s fine. the parrot looks at me and says “gotcha”. Parrots are awesome. I have an African Grey named Loki and he lives up to his name. He likes to scream and mimic the sounds of things falling off the shelf and when we run into the room to see what’s happening he says “The cat did it! Bad Sammy!” and laughs. Whenever he gets mad at me he flies away from me, but since he can’t fly very well, he always crash lands. And the first thing he says when I go to pick him up, without fail, is always “You need to vacuum,” in a very bitter grumble.  Loki likes to call our cat to him. He’ll sit there for minutes saying “here kitty kitty kitty.” The cat will come, walk up to the bird, get bit and then Loki will laugh as the cat screams and runs away. This goes on for hours.  If it’s late at night and he’s tired, but I’m still up with the lights on, he’ll say “Loki go night night.” It’s starts of in a normal tone and then gets louder and louder until he’s screaming “LOKI GO NIGHT NIGHT!”  If he sees my dad fall asleep, he screams like a little girl to scare my dad awake. And then laughs. He’s kind of perfected that evil laugh. But the best one was when I brought home the man who has since become my ex for the first time, Loki looked him dead in the eyes and said “I’m going to bite you.” My parrot was the first one to see what a bad person my ex. He was smarter than us all.  Parrots are people. @oneshortdamnfuse African Greys are like the greatest animal on the planet When I was a kid, we had a rescued african grey called Dodi, and once I was arguing with my mum about my bed time, and the parrot (who had some very foul mouthed previous owners) just shouted at me “for fuck sake go to bed!” also whenever we hoovered he’d call us “yoooou dusty cunts” best thing was he had a scottish accent Reblogging for Scottish swearing parrot YOOOOU DUSTY CUNTS
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America, Books, and Deer: MAKE AMERICA AN ENDLESS EXPANSE OF OLD-GROWTH FOREST WITH NO CERTAIN BORDERS AGAIN virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples. This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine. Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow. That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England.  Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment. Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first.  Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false

virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an e...

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