🔥 Popular | Latest

caitas-cooing: wendell-or-something: honestmerchantsailor: passivity: Would also be really annoying if they wore heat resistant gloves to throw back the hot tear gas canisters and if this got shared to all those protesting… Would be a further shame if people started covering cameras (as seen in Hong Kong, with protestors using poles and rakes to lift cardboard boxes over security cameras), blinding drone optics with laser pointers, and flooding police-run reporting apps with junk data. It would be a shame if the protesters noted that plainclothes cops can be identified a number of ways, such as wearing steel-toed boots; an armband or wristband of a particular color; driving white, black, or dark blue cars with concealed lights; or having the outline of cuffs visible in the back pocket or the bumps of an armor vest’s shoulder straps under their shirt. It would be a shame if the protesters began making their signs out of inch-thick plywood to stop rubber bullets, forming a tight shield wall to prevent police from singling out and mobbing individual protesters. It would be a shame if the people behind the shield wall held up umbrellas so that tear gas canisters fired over the heads of the front line will be bounced away. It would be a shame if protesters began constructing improvised armor vests out of duct tape, hardback books, and ceramic tiles. It would be a shame if protesters started wearing safety glasses, hard hats, respirators, and gardening gloves, all of which can be found at the same hardware stores as the plywood. It would be a shame if they started using traffic cones (the kind without the hole in the top) upside-down buckets, or other improvised lids to contain tear gas by placing them over the canisters. It would be a shame if protesters learned that police scanners are legal to own in the US, allowing them to learn where police are moving and what routes they intend to take. It would be a shame if they discovered that these scanners can be used to send as well as receive, allowing them to flood the scanner frequencies with noise. All this would be a terrible, terrible shame. a word of caution about the plywood though… I just reblogged a post earlier today saying that if a rubber bullet hits that and shatters it, the splinters can put you in more danger. depending on how you’re holding it up, it can also damage your arm if you’ve strapped it on somehow, and carrying a shield can make you a target for them to shoot things at, so it might actually be safer on the whole if you don’t try to construct a shield, counter intuitive though that may seem. It’d be a shame if I reblogged this and people read it: caitas-cooing: wendell-or-something: honestmerchantsailor: passivity: Would also be really annoying if they wore heat resistant gloves to throw back the hot tear gas canisters and if this got shared to all those protesting… Would be a further shame if people started covering cameras (as seen in Hong Kong, with protestors using poles and rakes to lift cardboard boxes over security cameras), blinding drone optics with laser pointers, and flooding police-run reporting apps with junk data. It would be a shame if the protesters noted that plainclothes cops can be identified a number of ways, such as wearing steel-toed boots; an armband or wristband of a particular color; driving white, black, or dark blue cars with concealed lights; or having the outline of cuffs visible in the back pocket or the bumps of an armor vest’s shoulder straps under their shirt. It would be a shame if the protesters began making their signs out of inch-thick plywood to stop rubber bullets, forming a tight shield wall to prevent police from singling out and mobbing individual protesters. It would be a shame if the people behind the shield wall held up umbrellas so that tear gas canisters fired over the heads of the front line will be bounced away. It would be a shame if protesters began constructing improvised armor vests out of duct tape, hardback books, and ceramic tiles. It would be a shame if protesters started wearing safety glasses, hard hats, respirators, and gardening gloves, all of which can be found at the same hardware stores as the plywood. It would be a shame if they started using traffic cones (the kind without the hole in the top) upside-down buckets, or other improvised lids to contain tear gas by placing them over the canisters. It would be a shame if protesters learned that police scanners are legal to own in the US, allowing them to learn where police are moving and what routes they intend to take. It would be a shame if they discovered that these scanners can be used to send as well as receive, allowing them to flood the scanner frequencies with noise. All this would be a terrible, terrible shame. a word of caution about the plywood though… I just reblogged a post earlier today saying that if a rubber bullet hits that and shatters it, the splinters can put you in more danger. depending on how you’re holding it up, it can also damage your arm if you’ve strapped it on somehow, and carrying a shield can make you a target for them to shoot things at, so it might actually be safer on the whole if you don’t try to construct a shield, counter intuitive though that may seem. It’d be a shame if I reblogged this and people read it

caitas-cooing: wendell-or-something: honestmerchantsailor: passivity: Would also be really annoying if they wore heat resistant gloves...

Save
gallusrostromegalus: huggablekaiju: aughtomaton: banyanyabread: elionking: rootbeergoddess: voidbat: callmebliss: rikodeine: ajax-daughter-of-telamon: tastefullyoffensive: (photo via princessmisery) This is a great idea! this is really cool. Kids hate the big plastic keys cos they’re not interesting, they wanna see the things the grownups use all the time I kinda want one of these. DUDE. it’s a giant fucking stim board! GENIUS. This is brilliant  Shit, I might make one of these for myself ^^ This is extremely devopmentally appropriate and smart Hey! They had a thing like this at my preschool, because not only is it a great entertainment center, its also a great tool for teaching toddlers fine motor skills.We also had a board with the fronts of shirts, jackets etc cut out and mounted so we could fool around with and learn how to use buttons, zippers, velcro etc, which meant I was dressing myself pretty early. We also had leftover keyboards, computer mice (sans cables) and a mix and match board of connector cables (bolted down and too short to strangle ourselves with) because I lived in silicon valley in the early 90’s when the tech boom was happening and parents would donate computer stuff for us to fuck around with.Im looking at those gate locks up there and that’s a bit of a bespoke parenting- Dad does run the risk of teaching this toddler how to escape a gated area like the yard, but if the kid isn’t prone to wandering, it’s a good safety thing for him to learn.Some other things to put on a fine motor skills stimboard: doorknobs and handles, switches and buttons (esp of you can wire them up to do something- kids learn patterns way earlier than you might think), window locks and cranks, assorted textures like carpet, fabrics, those reversible sequins, pebbles, sandpaper etc, the tops of jars with different kinds of lids top open and close, and (if you can stand it) anything that makes noises.But pretty much anything that can be fiddled with, changed by touching and is safe to nom on is a good thing.An additional caveat, from my own youth: if the fine motor boards are down at toddler height, dogs, cats, most pet birds and some reptiles will also play with and learn to manipulate these things. Which is also good mental stimulation for them but you can give your animals interesting ideas about what is ok to handle and teach them skills you might not want them to know.: gallusrostromegalus: huggablekaiju: aughtomaton: banyanyabread: elionking: rootbeergoddess: voidbat: callmebliss: rikodeine: ajax-daughter-of-telamon: tastefullyoffensive: (photo via princessmisery) This is a great idea! this is really cool. Kids hate the big plastic keys cos they’re not interesting, they wanna see the things the grownups use all the time I kinda want one of these. DUDE. it’s a giant fucking stim board! GENIUS. This is brilliant  Shit, I might make one of these for myself ^^ This is extremely devopmentally appropriate and smart Hey! They had a thing like this at my preschool, because not only is it a great entertainment center, its also a great tool for teaching toddlers fine motor skills.We also had a board with the fronts of shirts, jackets etc cut out and mounted so we could fool around with and learn how to use buttons, zippers, velcro etc, which meant I was dressing myself pretty early. We also had leftover keyboards, computer mice (sans cables) and a mix and match board of connector cables (bolted down and too short to strangle ourselves with) because I lived in silicon valley in the early 90’s when the tech boom was happening and parents would donate computer stuff for us to fuck around with.Im looking at those gate locks up there and that’s a bit of a bespoke parenting- Dad does run the risk of teaching this toddler how to escape a gated area like the yard, but if the kid isn’t prone to wandering, it’s a good safety thing for him to learn.Some other things to put on a fine motor skills stimboard: doorknobs and handles, switches and buttons (esp of you can wire them up to do something- kids learn patterns way earlier than you might think), window locks and cranks, assorted textures like carpet, fabrics, those reversible sequins, pebbles, sandpaper etc, the tops of jars with different kinds of lids top open and close, and (if you can stand it) anything that makes noises.But pretty much anything that can be fiddled with, changed by touching and is safe to nom on is a good thing.An additional caveat, from my own youth: if the fine motor boards are down at toddler height, dogs, cats, most pet birds and some reptiles will also play with and learn to manipulate these things. Which is also good mental stimulation for them but you can give your animals interesting ideas about what is ok to handle and teach them skills you might not want them to know.
Save
mighty-meerkat: bundibird: kaldicuct: vaporwavevocap: draconic-duelist: ranty9000: askshadetrixieandfamily: real-life-pine-tree: oddeyesarcpendulumdragon: based on a true story I don’t think Fortnite is to blame for kids nowadays not reading… That’s the joke. It’s the authoritarian overbearing parent. He was being sarcastic lol Reminded me of these That violin one hit close to home. I remember doing homework once, asked my grandmother if she was proud of me. “Do some thing for me to be proud of.” That hurt. That comic up there – I witnessed almost that exact scenario. Teacher wanted the kids to all pick books. One kid spots something on the shelf and gets visibly excited. Pulls it out and starts reading. Teacher sees it, snatches it off him and tells him that this is a book for 8 year olds (the kid was 15ish) and tells him to get a book more appropriate for his age. Kid slouches around the shelves for about 10 minutes, finally picks up a book at random and sits in his chair tucking the edges of each page into the binding to make that looped-page look. He didn’t read a word. He sat there and did this to his book for the remainder of the reading session: He had been genuinely excited about the 8 year old book he’d picked up. It was a new one in a series he used to read as a younger kid. He’d been actively sitting and reading, and then he was embarrassed in front of his classmates, told off for reading a kids book, and voila. He lost all enthusiasm for reading anything else that day. What’s worse? That kid had been hit by a car like a year and a half earlier. Severe brain trauma. Had to re-learn a lot of basic things, like how to speak and how to read. An 8 year old book would have been perfect for him. Easy enough to read that it would have helped rebuild his confidence in his own reading ability. A book meant for 15/16 years olds? A lot harder to read than a book for 8 year olds. Especially if you’re recovering from a relatively recent brain injury. And yeah, the teacher knew all about his brain injury, and the recovery. He just seemed go be of the opinion that the kid was 15, so he should be reading books for 15 year olds, irrespective of brain injury. Reading this thread I’m reminded of Daniel Pennae’s The Rights of the Reader, which can be found in a lot of bookshops and school libraries:  The child speaking at the bottom in Quentin Blake’s distinctive spiky handwriting is saying ‘10 rights, 1 warning: Don’t make fun of people who don’t read - or they never will’ : mighty-meerkat: bundibird: kaldicuct: vaporwavevocap: draconic-duelist: ranty9000: askshadetrixieandfamily: real-life-pine-tree: oddeyesarcpendulumdragon: based on a true story I don’t think Fortnite is to blame for kids nowadays not reading… That’s the joke. It’s the authoritarian overbearing parent. He was being sarcastic lol Reminded me of these That violin one hit close to home. I remember doing homework once, asked my grandmother if she was proud of me. “Do some thing for me to be proud of.” That hurt. That comic up there – I witnessed almost that exact scenario. Teacher wanted the kids to all pick books. One kid spots something on the shelf and gets visibly excited. Pulls it out and starts reading. Teacher sees it, snatches it off him and tells him that this is a book for 8 year olds (the kid was 15ish) and tells him to get a book more appropriate for his age. Kid slouches around the shelves for about 10 minutes, finally picks up a book at random and sits in his chair tucking the edges of each page into the binding to make that looped-page look. He didn’t read a word. He sat there and did this to his book for the remainder of the reading session: He had been genuinely excited about the 8 year old book he’d picked up. It was a new one in a series he used to read as a younger kid. He’d been actively sitting and reading, and then he was embarrassed in front of his classmates, told off for reading a kids book, and voila. He lost all enthusiasm for reading anything else that day. What’s worse? That kid had been hit by a car like a year and a half earlier. Severe brain trauma. Had to re-learn a lot of basic things, like how to speak and how to read. An 8 year old book would have been perfect for him. Easy enough to read that it would have helped rebuild his confidence in his own reading ability. A book meant for 15/16 years olds? A lot harder to read than a book for 8 year olds. Especially if you’re recovering from a relatively recent brain injury. And yeah, the teacher knew all about his brain injury, and the recovery. He just seemed go be of the opinion that the kid was 15, so he should be reading books for 15 year olds, irrespective of brain injury. Reading this thread I’m reminded of Daniel Pennae’s The Rights of the Reader, which can be found in a lot of bookshops and school libraries:  The child speaking at the bottom in Quentin Blake’s distinctive spiky handwriting is saying ‘10 rights, 1 warning: Don’t make fun of people who don’t read - or they never will’

mighty-meerkat: bundibird: kaldicuct: vaporwavevocap: draconic-duelist: ranty9000: askshadetrixieandfamily: real-life-pine-tree:...

Save
sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the comments… “She’s basically Hitler!” “Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?” “She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!”  And, my favorite… “Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?” Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting.  But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy.  Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS! https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/ : Trevor 12 hrs I have to admit, when Greta Thunberg began gaining popularity for her activism earlier this year, I didn't pay it much mind and just assumed it was another person complaining about global climate change without proposing and/or engaging in tangible, real world solutions. So, when I saw that she won TIME magazine's person of the year, I figured she has made great strides in combating climate change, and therefore I should probably take notice and take a look into how she is doing it and what she has proposed. Thankfully, I didn't have to look far since many people were posting her greatest hits here on FB. I admit, she appears quite passionate and she makes compelling points that something needs to be done to reverse climate change, all while being critical of everyone that says something needs to be done, but without proposing real world, tangible solutions that can broadly be applied to society. So, I keep watching and waiting for these solutions. As the videos draw to an end, I am yet to see anything of substance. Am I missing the part two of these? What is unique about her brand of activism? Is it just the accent? I am seriously interested in what reaction and results her activism has yielded. Can someone please explain it to me? I do have some issues with her "undeniable facts" and climate change activists, I will do my best to follow-up in the comments and/or other posts. Ben Grelle Yes, why isn't the 16-year old solving this crisis? What the hell, dude? Greta submitted the IPCC report as her testimony before Congress. That is what she bases her science on (as well as 99% of climate scientists) and that is where she asks people to go to look for the data and some of the solutions. (We won't have all the solutions as much of the research and emerging tech isn't well funded yet.) I don't think it is her responsibility to solve this. She is asking politicians to take this seriously. And she is inspiring a new generation to not be apathetic on this topic. That is what her activism is based on. And I think that is plenty. If you really want to look at the "real world" solutions, you can read the same report she did. There are 3 parts. The "summaries for policymakers" are the easiest to understand and a good place to start. You may need to download some PDFS. https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/ https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/ https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/ sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the comments… “She’s basically Hitler!” “Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?” “She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!”  And, my favorite… “Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?” Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting.  But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy.  Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS! https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/

sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the...

Save
yaboybergara: wearewatcher: WATCHER LOG 002:Shane here! With that January 10th launch around the corner, we’re gonna be sharing lil bits that we’ve been keeping secret for the past few months. So here’s a photo of Ryan on the day we bought our first few pieces of gear at a local camera shop. Minutes earlier when we actually checked out at the register we were both filled with a palpable mix of excitement and (completely unjustified) dread, as this was the moment we started spending actual money on a thing that had thus far existed exclusively in our three brains and in Steven’s weird graph paper notebooks that he loves so much.You’re likely thinking, “But Ryan doesn’t look nervous at all here!” And you’re right. Why? They gave us a free hat with the camera, that’s why. Worries evaporate when you get a free hat, and with a renewed sense of creative enthusiasm I asked Ryan to pose like a cinematographer showing off his sick new haul. He looks kinda gassy but otherwise, dude nailed it.Anyway, if you haven’t yet, swing by youtube.com/watcher (link in bio) and peep the channel trailer. And subscribe if you haven’t yet. No harm in that. If you already have? Hey, thanks. Uh, what else? Reduce, reuse, recycle. Don’t litter. Support your local library. Alright. Plenty left for us to do before launch, so it’s about time I hit the dusty trail. Til next time, Watchers! -Shane BONUS:: MEM A EOS canon Canon EOS yaboybergara: wearewatcher: WATCHER LOG 002:Shane here! With that January 10th launch around the corner, we’re gonna be sharing lil bits that we’ve been keeping secret for the past few months. So here’s a photo of Ryan on the day we bought our first few pieces of gear at a local camera shop. Minutes earlier when we actually checked out at the register we were both filled with a palpable mix of excitement and (completely unjustified) dread, as this was the moment we started spending actual money on a thing that had thus far existed exclusively in our three brains and in Steven’s weird graph paper notebooks that he loves so much.You’re likely thinking, “But Ryan doesn’t look nervous at all here!” And you’re right. Why? They gave us a free hat with the camera, that’s why. Worries evaporate when you get a free hat, and with a renewed sense of creative enthusiasm I asked Ryan to pose like a cinematographer showing off his sick new haul. He looks kinda gassy but otherwise, dude nailed it.Anyway, if you haven’t yet, swing by youtube.com/watcher (link in bio) and peep the channel trailer. And subscribe if you haven’t yet. No harm in that. If you already have? Hey, thanks. Uh, what else? Reduce, reuse, recycle. Don’t litter. Support your local library. Alright. Plenty left for us to do before launch, so it’s about time I hit the dusty trail. Til next time, Watchers! -Shane BONUS:

yaboybergara: wearewatcher: WATCHER LOG 002:Shane here! With that January 10th launch around the corner, we’re gonna be sharing lil bits...

Save
billdenbrough: billdenbrough: absolutely fucking losing it over the editors choosing to put finn saying “i didn’t even think about [richie’s sexuality] when we were shooting it until after” over footage of the arcade scene (vid credit) ok reblogging this bc some of the stuff in the notes is like, probably comedic, but i saw an ask earlier like ‘do you think finn is homophobic’ so like, in case it’s not and ppl are genuinely like ?! rn, i answered an ask in more detail here (where i have no patience for adults who yell at finn lmao) but general thrust is! i put this here bc i thought the editing choice was funny in terms of irony which is like, on the editors lmao, and doesn’t reflect on finn, and i talk in the ask a little abt the limitations of what can be said in interviews, but honestly i think he deliberately tried to like. pay respect to how harrowing homophobia is to experience by saying “it was a challenging thing to even act through… i’ve never gone through some of the things some people have” which like. especially in the context of this being a film that opened with a violent act of homophobia? is actually fairly cognisant for a teenager, esp one whose voice always gets weighted far beyond his own control : Bree billdenbrough: billdenbrough: absolutely fucking losing it over the editors choosing to put finn saying “i didn’t even think about [richie’s sexuality] when we were shooting it until after” over footage of the arcade scene (vid credit) ok reblogging this bc some of the stuff in the notes is like, probably comedic, but i saw an ask earlier like ‘do you think finn is homophobic’ so like, in case it’s not and ppl are genuinely like ?! rn, i answered an ask in more detail here (where i have no patience for adults who yell at finn lmao) but general thrust is! i put this here bc i thought the editing choice was funny in terms of irony which is like, on the editors lmao, and doesn’t reflect on finn, and i talk in the ask a little abt the limitations of what can be said in interviews, but honestly i think he deliberately tried to like. pay respect to how harrowing homophobia is to experience by saying “it was a challenging thing to even act through… i’ve never gone through some of the things some people have” which like. especially in the context of this being a film that opened with a violent act of homophobia? is actually fairly cognisant for a teenager, esp one whose voice always gets weighted far beyond his own control
Save