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dressesandyarn: magicalhomesandstuff: What’s encrypting your internet surfing? An algorithm created by a supercomputer? Well, if the site you’re visiting is encrypted by the cyber security firm Cloudflare, your activity may be protected by a wall of lava lamps. Cloudflare covers websites for Uber, OKCupid, & FitBit, for instance. The wall of  lamps in the San Francisco headquarters generates a random code. Over 100  lamps, in a variety of colors, and their patterns deter hackers from accessing data.   As the lava lamps bubble and swirl, a video camera on the ceiling monitors their unpredictable changes and connects the footage to a computer, which converts the randomness into a virtually unhackable code. Codes created by machines have relatively predictable patterns, so it’s possible for hackers to guess their algorithms, posing a security risk. Lava lamps, add to the equation the sheer randomness of the physical world, making it nearly impossible for hackers to break through. You might think that this would be kept secret, but it’s not. Simply go in and ask to see the lava lamp display. By allowing people to affect the video footage, human movement, static, and changes in lighting from the windows work together to make the random code even harder to predict. So, by standing in front of the display, you add an additional variable to the code, making it even harder to hack. Isn’t that interesting?  via atlasobscura.com What the fuck. : 2017 Google CLOUDFLARE dressesandyarn: magicalhomesandstuff: What’s encrypting your internet surfing? An algorithm created by a supercomputer? Well, if the site you’re visiting is encrypted by the cyber security firm Cloudflare, your activity may be protected by a wall of lava lamps. Cloudflare covers websites for Uber, OKCupid, & FitBit, for instance. The wall of  lamps in the San Francisco headquarters generates a random code. Over 100  lamps, in a variety of colors, and their patterns deter hackers from accessing data.   As the lava lamps bubble and swirl, a video camera on the ceiling monitors their unpredictable changes and connects the footage to a computer, which converts the randomness into a virtually unhackable code. Codes created by machines have relatively predictable patterns, so it’s possible for hackers to guess their algorithms, posing a security risk. Lava lamps, add to the equation the sheer randomness of the physical world, making it nearly impossible for hackers to break through. You might think that this would be kept secret, but it’s not. Simply go in and ask to see the lava lamp display. By allowing people to affect the video footage, human movement, static, and changes in lighting from the windows work together to make the random code even harder to predict. So, by standing in front of the display, you add an additional variable to the code, making it even harder to hack. Isn’t that interesting?  via atlasobscura.com What the fuck.
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thecheshirechloe: optometrictzedek: thewebcomicsreview: What’s funny is when you read articles about what happened, they never mention how Yahoo promised no ads only to put in ads anyway, pissing off and alienating users. They never mention that Verizon’s idea of “no adult content” was to implement poorly trained bots to clear the site of anything that looked like a tittie, which utterly failed at clearing the site of adult content or spam bots and instead forced millions of SFW users, especially artists, off the site. Instead they just say “Verizon’s decision to ban adult content upset and alienated many users.” Like no, that’s not even remotely what happened. I get new porn/spam bot follows daily even now, the problem is the worst its ever been, Verizon failed spectacularly at doing what they said they’d do (including protecting artists etc. from being targeted by their algorithms). The news wants the public to believe that we all threw a hissy fit and left en masse like a crowd of depraved neckbeards when tumblr banned adult content, driving the site into the ground as we left. Not a single article I’ve seen has discussed how Verizon/Yahoo is at fault. Not one. … do they not know that it’s their own fault?? Do they genuinely think that we’re all mad about the “lack of pornography”??? : Dan Primack @danprimack 3h Automattic paid peanuts for Tumblr. Source familiar puts it well south of $20 million. Reminder: Yahoo paid $1.1 billion for it. t Tumblr Verizon agrees to sell Tumblr to owner of Wordpress Yahoo acquired the company in 2013 for $1.1 billion. &axios.com 84 t1.1K 1.9K Dan Primack @danprimack 2h Again, just to be clear... emphasis on the "well below" $20 million... t39 448 Dan Primack @danprimack 3/Story updated: Price less than $3 million. 6:16 PM Aug 12, 2019 TweetDeck thecheshirechloe: optometrictzedek: thewebcomicsreview: What’s funny is when you read articles about what happened, they never mention how Yahoo promised no ads only to put in ads anyway, pissing off and alienating users. They never mention that Verizon’s idea of “no adult content” was to implement poorly trained bots to clear the site of anything that looked like a tittie, which utterly failed at clearing the site of adult content or spam bots and instead forced millions of SFW users, especially artists, off the site. Instead they just say “Verizon’s decision to ban adult content upset and alienated many users.” Like no, that’s not even remotely what happened. I get new porn/spam bot follows daily even now, the problem is the worst its ever been, Verizon failed spectacularly at doing what they said they’d do (including protecting artists etc. from being targeted by their algorithms). The news wants the public to believe that we all threw a hissy fit and left en masse like a crowd of depraved neckbeards when tumblr banned adult content, driving the site into the ground as we left. Not a single article I’ve seen has discussed how Verizon/Yahoo is at fault. Not one. … do they not know that it’s their own fault?? Do they genuinely think that we’re all mad about the “lack of pornography”???
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12000wheelsofseductivecheese: cutie-quinn: optometrictzedek: thewebcomicsreview: What’s funny is when you read articles about what happened, they never mention how Yahoo promised no ads only to put in ads anyway, pissing off and alienating users. They never mention that Verizon’s idea of “no adult content” was to implement poorly trained bots to clear the site of anything that looked like a tittie, which utterly failed at clearing the site of adult content or spam bots and instead forced millions of SFW users, especially artists, off the site. Instead they just say “Verizon’s decision to ban adult content upset and alienated many users.” Like no, that’s not even remotely what happened. I get new porn/spam bot follows daily even now, the problem is the worst its ever been, Verizon failed spectacularly at doing what they said they’d do (including protecting artists etc. from being targeted by their algorithms). The news wants the public to believe that we all threw a hissy fit and left en masse like a crowd of depraved neckbeards when tumblr banned adult content, driving the site into the ground as we left. Not a single article I’ve seen has discussed how Verizon/Yahoo is at fault. Not one. How cheap do you think we could buy it back for so we can put it back to normal? If we keep going at this rate then the Cards Against Humanity peeps probably COULD buy Tumblr.: Dan Primack @danprimack 3h Automattic paid peanuts for Tumblr. Source familiar puts it well south of $20 million. Reminder: Yahoo paid $1.1 billion for it. t Tumblr Verizon agrees to sell Tumblr to owner of Wordpress Yahoo acquired the company in 2013 for $1.1 billion. &axios.com 84 t1.1K 1.9K Dan Primack @danprimack 2h Again, just to be clear... emphasis on the "well below" $20 million... t39 448 Dan Primack @danprimack 3/Story updated: Price less than $3 million. 6:16 PM Aug 12, 2019 TweetDeck 12000wheelsofseductivecheese: cutie-quinn: optometrictzedek: thewebcomicsreview: What’s funny is when you read articles about what happened, they never mention how Yahoo promised no ads only to put in ads anyway, pissing off and alienating users. They never mention that Verizon’s idea of “no adult content” was to implement poorly trained bots to clear the site of anything that looked like a tittie, which utterly failed at clearing the site of adult content or spam bots and instead forced millions of SFW users, especially artists, off the site. Instead they just say “Verizon’s decision to ban adult content upset and alienated many users.” Like no, that’s not even remotely what happened. I get new porn/spam bot follows daily even now, the problem is the worst its ever been, Verizon failed spectacularly at doing what they said they’d do (including protecting artists etc. from being targeted by their algorithms). The news wants the public to believe that we all threw a hissy fit and left en masse like a crowd of depraved neckbeards when tumblr banned adult content, driving the site into the ground as we left. Not a single article I’ve seen has discussed how Verizon/Yahoo is at fault. Not one. How cheap do you think we could buy it back for so we can put it back to normal? If we keep going at this rate then the Cards Against Humanity peeps probably COULD buy Tumblr.
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