🔥 Popular | Latest

Another One, Apparently, and England: THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL A Eighty-seventh Year- 62 Pages Monday, July 21, 1969 Daily, per copy, 10 centa Latest Edition tt Moon Men Blast Off op Astronauts Begin Long Voyage Home The bug legged lower compartment of the lunar module, man began to build things and explore," said Flight Direc- By HARRY S. PEASE of The Journal Staff The crater that forced the fliers' last minute maneuver added further uncertainty Mission controllers here did their best to estimate the posi- Houston, Tex. - Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong mained behind as a monument to man's first visit. and Edwin Aldrin, jr., who had extended man's domain to the moon which served as a launching pad for the upper stage, re- tor Clifford E. Charlesworth The two astronauts' stay included 2 hours 13 minutes in It had balanced Armstrong and Aldrin on a column of which Armstrong's thick soled overshoes stirred the sooty tion of Eagle, the lunar module. They called upon Collins to Sunday, rocketed safely into the long voyage flame for more than 12 minutes during its active role Sun- lunar sand. Aldrin trod the surface about 1 hour and 43 search for it with the 28 power telescope in his navigating home just after 1 p.m. (Milwaukee time) Monday. They threaded their way through another maze of haz- day. minutes. sextant, but he could not see it. Later Armstrong and Aldrin used their rendezvous radar to ards in the upper stage of their lunar landing craft, firing ter the size of a football field and tiptoed to a landing in schoolboys in shallow water, made snapshots of one an- track Collins and the Columbia in the hope of determining the tried before on this mission. It drove them into a 50 mile the time wracked Sea of Tranquillity 40 seconds after 3:17 other like any other tourists, collected more than 50 landing point. They managed some 20 measurements of dis- They gamboled in the moon's one-sixth gravity like They dipped from orbit, strained upward'to clear a cra- for more than seven minutes an engine that had not been high orbit around the moon. After three and one-half hours they were scheduled to rejoin Michael Collins, who had orbited above them while landed," Armstrong radioed. they explored the lunar surface. And it will be about 11:55 p.m. when they call on their service propulsion engine for on the minor planet, human-kind's first venture on another one last mighty thrust to push them out ofunar orbit and onto a course that leads to the earth. tance as Columbia passed over, and the figures were fed into a computer. The machine produced another approximation of the LM's position. Officials of the national aeronautics and space administra- pounds of priceless soil and rocks and performed their in- p.m. "Houston, Tranquillity base here. The Eagle has tricate technical tasks with consummate skill. The rendezvous promised to be a little more tricky than The moment marked the beginning of a 211½ hour stay any yet attempted. Armstrong and Aldrin did not know quite where they were on the face of the moon. For some reason still unexplained, tion doubted that the uncertainty represented any physical they began their descent about four miles too far west, cosmic body. "I think it's the greatest thing that has been done since Turn to page A, col. 1 Luna Data Hints That It Landed One Small Step for Man... More on Apollo on moon, Page D, including text of Nixon's conversation. Transcripts of conversations of astronauts during descent of lunar module and John Glenn, ir., reflects on meaning of moon s u c cess, Page D. Armstrong's descent from the LM to the moon, Page A. Science fiction writer says the universe imposes some limits on space travel, Page B. Jodrell Bank, England-AP- Russia Monday landed Luna 15 on the moon 500 miles from where America's Apollo astro- nauts were preparing to take off on their journey back to earth, Jodrell Bank observa- tory reported. However, it apparently plunged to the surface of the moon at such high speed it could have been severely dam- aged. The tracking facility said Luna 15 was traveling around 300 miles an hour when it hit. Signals picked up at the giant radio telescope here in- dicated that after four days of moon orbit the unmanned probe landed on the moon's Sea of Crises, which is north- east and over mountains from the Apollo site on the Sea of Moon suits are expensive items, Page D. Reaction around the world is re- Armstrong's first words on moon recall other famous "first sounding, Page C. words" in history, Page D. Three Wisconsin acientists will be among those studying sam- ples from moon, Page C. James Reston writes that moon landing could be step toward a better earth, Page 2 Scientists expect a black market in fake moon dust, Page C. How Milwaukeeans reacted. Page 1, Part 2 Astronauts' wives use an array of adjectives to express their feelings, Page D, Armstrong's sister, who lives in Menomonee Falls, says she knew he was excited, Page 2, Part 2 Television pictures hardly need- ed embellishment, Page D. Astronaut families fit no stereo type. Page 6, part 2 Astronaut Frank Borman reads at White House religious service before President Nix- on talks on on trip, Local sidelights c Page 10, Part 2 on mo telephone to men Budget Warning My grandparents saved newspapers from parts of the 60s. Here's one from the moon landing 50 years ago today.

My grandparents saved newspapers from parts of the 60s. Here's one from the moon landing 50 years ago today.

Save
Baseball, Chicago, and Children: TELEGRAM FINAL TODAY WORCESTER ers,high in 70s yprilght, showers end ing, cool. Tomorrow clearing, warmer. De- tails on Page 21 EDITION CENTS OELIVERD aY CARIE 28 PAGES-TEN CENTS WORCESTER, MASS., MONDAY, JUY 21. 1969 C 1967 Wercester Tategram& Gaete, fe VOL L V 15 All ri reserved MAN ON MOON Astronauts Walk On Lunar Soil Armstrong, as the LM fouched down: Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed." By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD blast had dug out a crater only a foot deep, he reperted Having tested out the sarface Armstrong was jeined oude by Aldrin 10 minufes later. The two men then set out to depog seientific experiments and pho Hew York Times Hes Service Armstrong, as he stepped onto the moon HOUSTON- Men landed and walked on the moon yesterday Two American astronauts of Apollo 1t steered their fragile, four legged Ianar module safely tograph their activilies as the and smoothly to the historle landing at l:17:40 p.m. EDT Neil A. Armstrong, the 38 year-old civilian commander, radioed to earth and the control room here: "Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed." "That's one small step jor man, one giant leap for mankind." Srst mooriwalkers Outside their vehicle the as fronauts found a bleak world. It was just after dawn, with the sun low over the eastern hor zon behind them and the chill of the long lunar night still eling ing to the bonlders, smal cra- ters and hills before them He can't even ast to the office without under- going the agonies of the damned, but give him a little metal, a few chemicals, some wire and $20 or $30 billion, and vroom!, there he is strolling around on a rock a quarter of a million miles up in the sky." (Russell Baker, Page 7 On Rocky Plain The first men to reach the Armstrong and his copilot, Col. Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. of the Air Force- brought their craft to rest on a level, rock-strewn plain near southwestern shore of the arid Sea of Tranquillity. Less than seven hours later, Armstrong opened the landing craft's batc, stepped showly down the ladder ond planice the Tirst buman footprints oo the lu- Thousands' of Craters Aldrin said he could nen "it- erally thousmds of amatt era ters and a low hill out in the distance. But initially The was Impressed most of all by the "varlety of shapen, angalaritien, granularities of the rocka and soil where the landing Cralt code named Eagle, had sal moon Overcoming the technicalproblems posed in Sending a television picture from the earth to the moon cost several million dollars. (Page 28) the A man, paralyzed from the waist down, says he will swim the English Channel for the same reason man went to the moon: The determina- flon to achieve. (Page 21) unop Both Armsrong and Aidrin Turn to ARMSTRONG Page President Nixon and other leaders of the na- fiun gather in the White House to pray for the success of the Apollo mission. (Page 4) nar crust At 10:56:20 p.m., as a tele vision camera mounted outside the craft transmitted his every move to a wailing carth, Arm strong put one foot down on the moon "That's one small step for man," the American astronaut said, "but one giant leap for mankind." His first steps were tentative, testing to see how firm was the lunar soil The surface appears to be very, very fine grained." Arm- strong radioed. "It's almost sort of a powder very fine." He quickly discovered he had no difficulty moving around in his bulky spacesuit and in the gravity that is one-sixth that of earths. He called it "very com fortable" His footprints, he said. were shallow. On landing, the rocket APOLLO 11 AP Wirephote Neil A. Armstrong, the first man on the moon, walks near the base of Eagle. The light 'in bottom of the picture is the moon's surface. The dark at the top is space TIMETABLE Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. took to the moon a piece of communion bread he will use to symbolize fellowship with his church on earth. (Page 4) TODAY Lunar Visitor Is Impressed By 'Stark Beauty' of It All 1:50 pm-Armstrong and Al drin ignite ascent engine of lunar module and fly it Iato crbit, maneavering ir a ren deavous with astruntut Collins in the command service mod ule. $:30 p.m.-Command sevice module dock 9:23 p.m. jettisoned from cammand ship and abandoned in moon erbit Tomorrow at 12:55 a.m. the command service module, car rying the three astronauts, ill Teave moon orbit for the trip back to earth MANY OFFICES Former President Lyndon B. Johnson credits the American form of government and civilian direction with bringing success to the space pro- gram. (Page 4) CLOSED TODAY In compliance with President Richard M. Nixon's call for a "national day of participation," all federal offices will be closed today. Mail will not be deliv ered The moon landing and Tchaikovsky share the applause at Tanglewood. (Page 11) and lunar oule (From Wire Services - down there, it's the Lamar module is HOUSTON What's More Moon Photos on Page 4 moon like? They surely went. The man believes that be- causo Walter Cronkite said so." (James R Wheeler, Page 28.) "It's like the high desert of the United States" said the first man there, Neil A. Arm- strong. "It has a stark beauty all its Own. It's much like the high desert of the United States. It's different, but it's very pretty Worcester's city government offices will operate on a limited basis with minimum staffs. City Hall will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m Retail stores, In general, will be open, and The Evening Ga zette will be published. In Grafton, Spencer and Clin- ton town halls and all municipal offices will be closed all day In Usbridge. the Town Hall and treasurer's, collectors', clerk's and asessors' offices will be closed. In Athol, the Distriot Court will remain open, while the li and said the dust made rocks on the moon "rather slippery He said the scenery was e close to it. It's almost like pow- der. It's very fine. The surface is fine and pow- dery. I can pick it up loosely with my toe. It does adhere in fine layers like powdered char- coal to the sole and the sides of NASA Administrator Thomas O. Paine hails a "new era" marked by the lunar landing. (Page 5) of "magnificent desolation and added that he had found a purple rock The rock, he thought. biotite, a silicate made of mas nesium, iron, alumium and po tassium. It is ally brown 00 earth. Pope Paul VI salutes the astronauts, calling them conquerors of the moon. pale lamp of our nights and dreams." (Page 5) out here." my boots "I only go in a small fraction of an inch, maybe an eighth of an inch, but I can see the foot- prints of my boots and the treads in the fine sandy par- ticles." Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. also found the surface "powdery" As Armstrong reached the foot of the ladder from Eagle, he said: On the U.S. Navy ship that is to recover Apollo 11, sailors toss their hats into the air when the moon landing is announced. (Page 5) 11 The LEM foot pads are only Armstrong said lot" of the rocks had vesicles small holes once filled with ases depressed in the surface about one or two inches, although the surface appears to be very very fine grained as you get on their surfaces This may in brary, post office and Town Pat White, widow of astronaut Edward H White- one of three who died in an Apollo fire in 1967 says she "couldn't be happier" about the moon landing. (Page 5) dicate that the rocks are of vol canic origin Hall will be closed. Kennedy Faces Charge In Auto Crash Fatality Old Orchard Egypt, Israel In Fierce Air, Cannon Duel London's Trafalgar Square rings with cheers and sereams of delight as Britons watch on a huge monitor Screen. They danced in Chile, shouted joyfully in Moscow. (Page 3) Blaze Stuns Townspeople Central Massachusetts residents, for the most part, watch the moon walk from home television Screens, (Page 13) EDGARTOWN (AP) A complaint is being filed, charging Sen. Edward M. Ken- nedy with leaving the scene of an auto accident In which he was slightly injured and a wom an companion drowned, police said yesterday. The victim, Miss Mary Jo Ko- pechne, 28, of Washington former secretary to the late Sen. Robert D N.Y., was riding in a car that went off a narrow bridge into a nin Armold Sawisiak of United Press International discusses what ef tect the accdent on Martha's Vineyard might have on Sen Ed- ward M. Kennady's political ca reer. Story on Page 7 pag By JACK TUBERT Of The Telegram Staff BY The Aapciated Press Israeli and Egyptlan jets bat- tled aver the Sues Canal yester day and raided each other's territory n some of the heaviest fighting since the Middle East war of 17 Each side elaimed shooting down a large number of planes Eavpt said it downed 17 Israe i jets and called R the "Arabs greatest victory" since 1967, Is rael admitted losing two planes and sald five Egyptian planes were downed-three MIGS and two Sukhol SU/7 Dighters The fghting began early yesterday with an Iseaell com mando allsck on an Eoptian is land fortress in the Gull of Sa ISTaeli planes followed up by hit BEACH ORCHARD The silence was so OLD Maine loud it hart. Missing most against the Sound of the surf were the harsh but happy sounds of the ancient merry go-round calliope that overrode every child's memory of this seaside amuse- ment center swept Satarday pond on night by a $500,000 fire Hurt was everywhere It showed most in the faces of children, looking at charred twisted black ruins that once formed their fragile, bright paint world of summer fun. 11 Major League Baseball NATIONAL LEAGUE San Francisco 7, Los Angeles AMERICAN LEAGUE Ba6Baltimore S Defroit 2 Cleveliand 2 Cleetand Detrolt&(10) New Yore 1 Washington 2 Kansas City 8 Chicago 6 K City 3Chicago 2 (11) este 11, Seattle 7 (18 spended game M Sattie C Cand Caiornla 6 J. Arena told newsmn yester day But the matter of the ime pe riod after the accidem-there is, in my oplnion, a volation concerning guing trom the scene, leaving the sce Arena sald notice of tbe con- plaint had been tet by regis tered mail to heoredy, bat be cause todays ma edes have been suspended ta cser vance of the Apalo 11 msains Atlanta 10, San Diego 0 Chicago 1, Philadelphia 0 Chicago & Phlladelphla 1 Montrest 3 New York 2 New York 4 Montreal 3 ST. Louls at Pittsburgh, ppd. Houston at Cincinnati (1st ppd.) Houston at Cincinnat (2nd Kennedy Chappaquiddick Island. Kennedy, who was driving, sus- tained what a physician said was a mild concussion. The accident happened be- tween 11 p.m. Friday and 1 a.m. Saturday, but went unre ported until 10 a.m. Saturday. am firmly convinced that there was no negligence In- volved," Police Chief Dominic Oakland 3 INDEX Pago 14-16 AP W te Mrs. Stephen Armstreng, mether of astrenaut Neil Armstreng Dred and anxieus in her home at Wapakeneta, Ohie, as she and har husband talked vith newsmen after the Eagle landed on the Page Classified Comics Deaths Editarials Radio TV 21-27 Sports Theater, Arts Weathor the earliest Kennedy codld re ting gyptian positions across people. Deeper hopelessness in 10 Hurt was in the eves of towns 17 21 Turn to POLICE Page2 Ture o NEW BATTLES Page 2 Women's 28 Turn to OLD ORCHARD P. 12 moon. Founds this old newspaper from 1969

Founds this old newspaper from 1969

Save
Children, Confused, and Philadelphia Eagles: Apollo 11 To go where no man has ever been... machinists, astronomers, geologists, all To stand where no man has ever the collective disciplines that the doubt- stood before . .. It has occasionally been a challenge society. . ." to lure man to folly and sometimes to disaster. But yesterday, with the landing on flawless precision with which NASA ex- the moon, the United States met the ecuted the mission, obscured the dangers challenge with a grace and simplicity to and complexity of a most dangerous voy stir the world. For a nation supposedly confused, corrupted by its own wealth, it was a parts in the intricate command and lun- disciplined display of courage and awe- ar modules is a credit to the men in in- some power. And, as the seconds slipped by to and assembled them. And it is an assur- touchdown in the Sea of Tranquility ance to the taxpayer that his money was it was a moment to draw families to- spent properly. gether-wives, husbands and children- and to kindle in all Mankind a sense of it, no magic formula, no hesitancy in pride and dignity. Surely, it was one of Mankind's finest world scrutiny, whether the outcome hours. ers deride as a "relic. . . of a worn-out The quiet, spare exchanges between Houston and Apollo, the ease and almost age to the point of no return. The faultless working of millions of dustry and science who manufactured And there was no secretiveness about baring every step in the m0on landing to might be success or failure. And the Establishment decided on And when some historian of a distant this with reliance on a century looks back over the years to creed: Hard work is the key to success. write the conquest of the moon, let him look long and close enough to record one sounds almost quaint. But hard work en- fact: For one long day, the world certainly For, to strive mightily-and fail-is at was almost one. This moment of unity is perhaps fleet- ing, fragile, quick to surrender to the re- newal of old animosities. But it happened: it was evident in the brighter than his yesterdays. faces the TV cameras scanned around the world as Astronaut Neil Armstrong step- atom, conceived long before World War ped into Eagle's long, gaunt shadow. For once, Mankind had laid aside the enabling him to harness a new source of fears and frustrations that divide him, t0 energy for the betterment of the human share a single sense of identity in the condition, conquest of the moon. The bearing of the astronauts the Government that sent them enough to impress, if not to silence, the doubters-those who deride the United moon will stop to read the stainless steel States as selfish and arrogant. The very Establishment these doubt- ers revile planned and executed the most Three brave men difficult undertaking in history, one ul- strong, Aldrin and Collins timately to launch man to the conquest the moon in man's first venture into the of hunger, privation and disease. It was the "squares" that brought it off the tired men with briefcases, in them say: They and Mankind came as Government and industry, the engineers, they said they would-"in peace." single tenet of its Amid the scoffings of the doubters, it nobles success. And it dignifies failure. least to say, we tried. As for the future, it has always seem- ed that man's tomorrows, his dreams, are It was so with the splitting of the II as a means of lightening man's burden, But with the fulfillment of the dream and of atomic fission, it became a weapon to was terrorize the planet. In centuries to come, passersby on the plate unveiled by the astronauts. And they will echo what we say now: Astronauts Arm- -conquered solar system. But let them say more than that. Let My girlfriend's parents have a clipping from the paper celebrating Apollo 11

My girlfriend's parents have a clipping from the paper celebrating Apollo 11

Save
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Apollo: The only photo of Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong working on the surface of the Moon on this day 50 years ago - the rest were of Buzz Aldrin photographed by Neil

The only photo of Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong working on the surface of the Moon on this day 50 years ago - the rest were of Buzz Ald...

Save
Beautiful, Finance, and Fire: EXTRA EXTRA EXTRA EXTRA San Francisco Chronicle FINAL The Weather Bay Are: Fair teday ex cept for moning cloudi ISs Hgh mid-S0s, lon: Aterroon fis winds, See Page 31 No. 201 105th Year MONDAY, JULY 21, 1969 N 10 CENTS GArfield 1-1111 MEN ON MOON Man Makes a Lunar Landing --Astronauts Walk on Surface Historic Moment Spacemen Scout The Landscape Times-Post Servire Houston Man stepped out onto the moon last night for the first time in his two-million-year history That's one small step for man-one giant leap for mankind," declared astronaut Neil Armstrong at 7:56 p.m. (PDT) as he began his lunar exploration about 31 hours earlier than originally scheduled. Just after that historic mo- ment in man's quest for his origins. Armstrong walked on the dead planet and found the surface very powdery, lit- tered with fine grains of black dust Eagle Lands Close to Just after 8 p.m. (PDT), astronaut Edwin (Buzz) Ald- rin joined Armstrong on the lunar surface and put on a show for a worldwide televi- sion audience that will long be remembered as a truy Houston beautiful experience Target Area Times-Post Service spacecraft called Eagle, two A mericans landed on the lifeless yesterday first humans in history to touch down on another heavenly body In a The two men walked easi- ly, talked easily, even ran the moon More Apollo news Pages 1A through 7 and jumped happily. seemed. They picked up rocks and talked at length of for astronauts Neil Arm- what they saw. So it The majestic moment strong and Edwin (BuZz) an American Aldrin came at 1:17 p.m. (PDT) when they set their They planted flag, saluted it and talked by four-legged wingless land- radiophone with the Presi- dent of the United States in ing craft down in the the White House and then moon's Sea of Tranquillitv. faced the camera and salut- ed Mr. Nixon. AP W ireahato The first mer en on the moon, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, planted a plastic American flag in the lunar soil "Tranquillity Base, here. Armstrong announced to a What Spacemen Found-- Moon's Unusual Rocks Air War Erupts In the Mideast Chief Says Kennedy to Be Charged "The surface is fine and breathless world. The Eagle powdery," Armstrong said has landed. "I can kick it up loosely with my toe "It adheres like powdered astronaut Charles Duke said charcoal to the boot." he from Hou ston's Manned went on, "but I only go in a BEAUTIFUL "You did a beautiful job," Spacecraft Center. "Be ad- They may indicate that wa- the soil with one foot while small fraction of an inch. Ivised there's lots of smiling ter has existed in the lunar he still clung to the ladder of can see my footprints in the faces down here. " By Darid Perlman Science Correspoudent New York Times New York Times water whose atoms the lunar module. He kicked moon like fine grainy parti- matter wThere's two of em up Full-scale ground and antiaircraft positions and ar- aerlal warfare erupted be- tillery installations between Edgartown, Mass. tween Israel and the Kantara and Port Said. United Arab Republic yes- terday in a four-battle reply to almost routine artil- tha's Vineyard sent Sena- last night. Houston have now entered the crys- it and reported to Mission cles." Armstrong found he had here," Armstrong replied. Two men and a space talline structure of shiny Control on earth how the And don't forget The police chief of this one up "moon dust" collects in fine such little trouble walking on The first Apollo moon mis. layers "like powdered char- the moon that he began talk- here," said astronautMi- sion has already proven as The Israeli attack began in small resort town on Mar. ship began to rewrite the moon minerals. science of the solar system See Back Page coal to the sole and sides of ing almost as if he didn't lery fire and continued al- tor Edward M. Kennedy Israeli ighter-bombers most without opposition for formal notice yesterday along the Suez Canal. want to leave it. Within minutes of their valuable as the world's scien./y boot." struck in suecessive waves at two hours, when Egyptian that he is seeking his pros- landing on the moon, in an tists had any right to hope Examining the disc-shaped Egyptlan military positions jets were sent aloft aleng the eanal in the first assaull snce the Six-Day that its ground gunners and "It has a stark beauty all footpads on the spacecraft he its own," Armstrong said. reported how surprisingly lit- It's like the desert in the Astroanuts Neil Armstrong tle they had dented the soil southwestern United States. leeted uncontaminated nucle- and Edwin Aldrin began on landing - little more than It's very pretty out here." Armstrong shared his first ecution for leaving the exploration televised for allar the e arth to watch, they Index scene of an accident. found unexpected rocks, col- Cairo reported at nightfall 34 Penalties for those found Comics or range from two months to ar particles from the sun, making close-up scientific an inch or two, he said. two years in jail. But Dukes and examined craters of cu observations from their very War in 1967 Egyptian air- pilots had shot down 19 Isra- guilty of such a misdemean- Deaths 33 eraft followed with attacks eli aircrait. an laraeli radar stations and anfi-aireraft missile sites in the Sinai Peninsüla Spokesmen ih Jerusalem length of the canal. Three 1s of an accident normally re- the existence of volcanic ac- earlier. 39 Soon he seooped up the incredible moments on the Entertainment first steps on the lunar surfirst "contingency sample" moon with the whole world. Finance face 50 The Egypt ian fighters county officials said that con- rious shapes and sizes just as they had alof Iunar material. The sur- as a television camera on the TV-Radio The rocks may well prove ready done trom lunar orbit face was soft, he said, and he outside of fhe wingless Eagle weather 38 came in low over the entire victions for leaving the scene 51 scrabbled into it with a landing craft sent back an on long-handled rod to which a azingly clear picture of Women's News See Page A. Col 1 perhaps livity on the moon 15 said Iuraeli jets bombed and raeli soldiers were reported siult in suspended sentences etrafed ERyptian SAM Injured in the Egyptian straf- ground- fo air missiles bases Even before he stepped the meon. Armstrong kicked The netice, Chief Dominick eons ago, perhaps very re- cently. See Back Page See Rack Page See Beck Pege Original printing of the July 21, 1969 SF Chronicle I found in a stack of sealed newspapers at an estate sale for $15 last year.

Original printing of the July 21, 1969 SF Chronicle I found in a stack of sealed newspapers at an estate sale for $15 last year.

Save
Beautiful, Birthday, and Gif: enraged-sapphic: marvelmoviefan48: gothdesss: pinky–heart: alfrhedoo: nothing–breaks-like-a-heart: ressila: lacinari: ixpaloa: cyber-shopping–addiction: 🌟THE MOST ICONIC LAMPS ON SALE!! SALE UP 50% OFF! 🌟 SALE ENDS SOON! ***USE COUPON CODE: TUMBLR FOR AN EXTRA DISCOUNT*** – GET THE 16 DIFFERENT COLORS MOON LAMP HERE – – GET THE LED LIGHTS ROSE LAMP HERE – – GET THE FULL MOON LAMP HERE – – GET THE PINK CHERRY BLOSSOM LAMP HERE – – GET THE CAT LAMP HERE – – GET THE PHOTOS CLIP STRING LIGHT HERE – – GET THE MAGICAL CLOUD LAMP HERE – – GET THE DIY LETTERS LIGHT BOX LAMP HERE – – GET THE MOON LAMP KEYCHAIN HERE – – GET THE SPIRITED AWAY LAMP HERE – – GET THE STITCH LAMP HERE – – GET THE ASTRONAUT LAMP HERE – – GET THE MAGIC BOOK LAMP HERE – – GET THE LED UNICORN LAMP HERE – I really badly need this to my new room. Love the moon lamp. My girlfriend got me one for my birthday it’s beautiful. Highly recommend it. So pretty relaxing. It can be the white moon like shown or a harvest orange. *casually reblogs this so i don’t lose it* I have the moon and it’s the best thing ever. Such a good night light It looks amazing! I really recommend. Got one just like this as an anniversary gift it’s honestly the most meaningful, beautiful, precious gift I’ve ever received .. “I love you to the moon back” 🌕🥺❤️ highly recommend getting for someone special. It’s comforting when it gets dark. Okay the magic book lamp is really cool. *also casually reblogs so i don’t loose it* THE MOON IS AMAZING GUY’S BUY IT
Save
Baseball, Countdown, and Drake: STATES-FOUNDED 1771 THE OLDEST DAILY NEWSPAPER IN THE UNITED THE WEATHER U. S. Weather Bureau Forecast The Philadelphia nquirer and vicinity Philadelphia Cloudy with rain showers and a few thandershowers likely Mon- day. Clearing and warm Tues- day. Precipitation probabillty 80 percent Monday LATE METRO LEDGER Sun rises Sun sels Moon sets 5.49 A. M. 8:25 P. M 11:48 P. M. PUBLIC THE PEOPLE AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER FOR ALL Daily: Home Delivery 60 Cents Per Week MONDAY MORNING. JULY 21, 1969 Conrisht 199 by Triancle Publications, Inc, Vol. 2 No 21 TEN CENTS MAN LANDS ON MOON 'Eagle Has Landed,' Astronauts Say 2 Stay Inside, Describe Land As Gray, Dusty Man HOUSTON, July 20 (AP). landed on the moon at 4:18 P. M. Sunday. Two men, Neil A. Armstrog and Ed- win E. Aldrin Jr., 240,000 miles away from Earth, came to a dusty landing on the moon's surface, the first men to touch its alien soil. "Tranquility Base here," said Aldrin, an has landed." From some 60-odd miles above the moon, Air Force Lt. Col. Michael Collins in the com- mand ship Columbia chimed in with "fantastic." The unofficial time of the Eagle's landfall on the moon's Sea of Tranquillity was 102 hours, 45 minutes and 42 seconds after blastoff last Wednesday, July 16, from Cape Kennedy, Fla. You're looking good here," said ground control We're going to be busy for a minute," Armstrong said moments after touchdown Very smooth touchdown," said Aldris. SThe first minutes on the lanar surface were mostly silent, as Armstrong and Aldrin quickly readied everything Sn tbeir spider-like space taxi for an emsergency blast-off, if necessary. The initial moments were for a decislon on whether to stay on the dusty surface. The spacecraft engine began kicking up dust from the moment it was 40 feot above on its descent. Armstrong's first description of the landing area was terse. He apologized for taking a little longer than planned in his landing. The auto-targeting was taking us right into a football fieldsized crater, he said, with a large number of big boulders and rocks and it required us to fly manualy over the rock field to find a reasonably good area. "It looks like a collection of just about every varlety Air Force colonel. "The Eagle BAUNITED STATES AP Wibto of shapes, angularities, granularities just about every variety ASTRONAUTS EDWIN ALDRIN (LEFT) AND NEIL ARMSTRONG GATHER ROCK SAMPLES IN SIMULATED MOON LANDING. of rocks you can find." Aldrin reported. Aldrin said there didn't seem to be much color, but he said some rocks in view Look as though they will have some interesting color to them." This one-sixth G (gravity) is just like in an airplane" Armstrong said. When told by ground control there were lois of smiling faces around the world, Armstrong replied, There are two of them up here Ground control reported at 4:32 P. M. that Eagle's Allen Returns to Phils Egyptian Jets, 7000 at Franklin Institute Skinner Says He Maylsraeli Planes Cheer News of Touch-Down Start Play Thursday Battle at Suez [stretched some 80 feet aeross A number of figures in spaceSystems looked good after the landing. This was important, the room, and propelled along suits stand sentinal along the because the ship must carry the astronauts back into orbit by escaping air, simulating the Institute's corridors, and modonday By MERRIE SPAETH Of The Inquirer Stoff tory of major league baseball The Phillies star first base- man, one of baseball's great srsell and Egyptian Jets bat enthusiasts wbo crowded into By ALLEN LEWIS TEL AVIV, July 20 (AP). Collins talked to "Tranquility Base" and sald "it sure More than 7000 moon-lifghtction-reaction principal that els of each of NASA's three of The Inquirer Staff Richie Alen, who vowed alsiuggers, was restored to the tled over the Suez Canal Sun- the Franklin Institute scien Propel the moon rocket itself.space capsules-Gemini, Mer-sounded great. You guys did a fantastic job." most four weeks ago that he elab's payroll Sunday after à 26- day and raided each other's ter museum on would never again play for the day Phillies, is back after wbat is moroing conference with Man ighting since the mideast war at 4:20 P.M. after a dramaballoon rocket. A two-foot gold Many, particularly those from Thank you," replied Armstrong. "Just keep that orbit- ing. base ready for us." "Will do," replied Collins in Columbia, "Contact light on. Engine off. Eagle has landed Three awards have been pre-cury and Apollo-are on dis- Sunday let out thunderous roar of joy whencntedeach day during the play. In all, about 10,000 persons Jongest distance traveled by a isited the museum Sunday. suspension following & ritory in some of the heaviesthe lunar module touched dowwn Progress of the moon flight for believed to be the longest sus ager Bob Skinner, Allen then pension without pay in the bis left Connie Mack Stadlum for of 1967, Each side claimed it filled aoproach The obseryers gathered tense trophy wrill go to the overall Outside the Greater Phlladelphia ly in front of more than 20 tele-winner TOO BUSY AT CONTROLS his Germatown home to "do shot down a large number of Some throwing Almost immediately, mission control began referring to the landed men with a new radio call sign, Tranquillity Base," dropping the old code name, "Eagle." During the descent, Armstrong said, he was too busy with the control panels to pick out some of the required landmarks. Mission control told him not to worry After giving their landing craft's system a quick check, Armstrong and Aldrin simulated a countdown to make sure everything was set for their blastoff Monday. Armstrong reported there were several alarm signals Continued on Page 6, Column 4 planes Egypt said It down 17 Israel vision sets set up along the Rivaling tbe balloon rocket Jets and called it the "Arabs institute's corridors to provide cotest in popularity with the Left Wreck Scene MAY START THURSDAY Police to Flla Älen, who will bave to work greatest victory since 1967 continuous coverage of the youngsters was a "frictionless rocket chair, in wbich you can Page of Astronout Pictures on out for a Yew days to get back Each side elaimed it shot down moon light, into playing condition, is expect a large number of planes, ed do be in uniform Thursday mght, when'the Phillies open a jets and called it the "Arabs the successful conclusion of an- Page 5 Another Picture, Re- lated News and Com ment on Well-wishers all over the city propel yourself in any direction Complaint On Kennedy Egypt said it down 17 Israeli slso breathed sighs of reliof at by releasing jets of air. Among many other special greatest victory" since 1967other critical phase of the moon exhibits are one of astronaut Pages 3, 4, 6, The Phillies lost, 1-0, 1lo the israel admitted losing twolight. A crowd of thousands out-food, and continuous showings Cubf in the opener of doubleheader Story and Bozscore on Page 20 planes and said five Egyptian Bide Independence Hall broke of space ftight films furnished planes were down, three MIGSnto applause at the terse, tele-by the National Aeronautics and and two Sukhoi SU-7 fighters, and 12. EDGARTOWN, Mass., July 20 (AP),A complaint charing Sen. Edward M Keanedy with leaving the scene of an ccident four-game series with the Hous- ISLAND ATTACKED will be sought as the result of Q4 auto wreek in which a wom He may or may not be in the day with an Isracli commando at the sclence museum at 20th Space Administration Continged on Page 3, Columu 4 vised announcement We're on the moon." More than twice the usual Davis Visits Wailing Wall Millions of Words Tell Tale The fighting began early Sua Dumber of visitors turned up ton Astros in the Astrodome. World Press Hails Venture an died, police said Sunday The vietim, Mary Jo Kope starting lineup at that time, de- attack on an Egyptian island st, and the Parkway despite chne, 28, of Washington,, form. pending er secretary to the late Sen on. Robert F. Kebnedy (D., N. Y.) was riding in a car that skidded len incidents, watch cost the Suez Canal for the first the Apollo 11 moon mission. off a narrow bridge and into a Richie about $12,000 of his re- ime since the 1967 war, and Adult visitors took a m0on pond on Chappaquiddick Island, Poled $75,000 salary, occurred in Egyptian jets then took to the space quiz, and found the ancitement built up slowly in make dealines as the big mo morning on his physical condi- fortress in the Gulf of Suez. sloppy weather to viow and Israeli planes followed up by experience scores of special The latest in a long line of hitting Egyptian positions across exhibits and programs spun of JERUSALEM, July 20 (APY American entertainer Sao3my Davis Jr. visited the Watlng Seated at long, gray tables,'down, one mlion words will watl on Sunday. He said be learphones to their heads, at have been seat to all parts of had been looking forward to HOUSTON, July 20-The ex-loast 150 newsmen rushed to the world Sunday and Mondayseeing the Wall-the Jews' most By DONALD C. DRAKE Of The Inquirer Staff Kennedy was driving. He re-New York June 24 when Richie air to raid Israeli targets in the swers to questions like How portedly escaped with what spfaled to show up for a twl-night occupled Sinaj Desert parently was only a mild con- doubleheader with the New cussion The accident happened be tween 11 P. M. Friday and 1 bill, whlch bgan at 5:05 P.M., ritory. A.M. Saturday, bat went unre- Skinner announced Richle had Military communiques from in touch with the Institute's own newsmen and television writers change anything went wrong, Japancse, German, Italian, ported until 10 A M. Saturday. been suspended without pay, "L am firmly convinced there Allen's reaction was quick and Israeli Mirage was shot down by in an opinion poll on the sig-Loudspeakers bleamed was no neglizence involved, typlcal: "Good, I need a vacea antiafrcraft fire during the com. nifioance of the moon trip, Police Chiet Domicic J. Arena tion. The next day he said. ed Jater Sunday morning, nine n the spacious Ben Frankin the ground cod Apollo 11 and careers would be ruined toid newimen Sunday. "But the "I'm through withthe Phillies mando raid, another was downBoom youngsters from 5 to 12 closed-cireuit televislon matter of the time period after until they trade me. the accident, there is, in my sacred shrine-ever aince he The total number of words be- coaverted to the Jewish religioa much would you weigh on the Building One at the Manned ment approeched The clatter of the typewriters ing written is many times one in 1935 Israeli sald the pilots of its moon?" in exhibits soattered all Spaceeraft Center two downed aircraft balled out over the museum. This is the low modernistic made it difficult to bear. million, however, beeause many In the next few hours history correspondeats send in their sto- York Mets at Shea Stadlum Between games of the twin safely and landed in ISraeli ter More than 150 ham radio op-alte building that has been 3n The Inquirer erators all over the world weretaken over by more than 2500 would be made and, by ries over telephones Departments and Features requiring a backup system for Mexican. the the astronauts to make it offThe accents and languages Amuiements Egypt and Cairo Radio said onelham radio station, taking part from ell over the world. Death Notiees 14 Editorials 12 Obituaries t 16, 17 Sports 20 la 26, erytic comnsunication between the mnoon, many promisiog are many and varied and the I0, 11 writers of each nation seem to Basiness and Financial Ever since Wednesday, there stic together mon in the afternoon and six more years old stood patiently in long itors showed figures indicating bas been a bustle in this place Efforts made to contact Allen in the evening, Caire said most nes to take part in a balloon the umber of minutes into the bat it was reaching a cim Apolo 11 is probably the most Classified Ads K is speculated here that rocket contest. Balloons were mission, hunar revolutions and wires what haye you Western Union here said that iby the time Apollo 11 spiashes Continued on Page 3, Column 1Comica 26 to 38 Televislon and Badio 31 Page 2, Column 4 inflated, Continned or Page 18, Column 3 Continued on Page 20, Column 5 Continued on attached to From my late grandfather's collection.

From my late grandfather's collection.

Save