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England, Fucking, and Stephen: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. runawayrat: squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens Im fucking deceased
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England, Stephen, and Tumblr: squidsticks A Portrait of James l's Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgow "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 0) A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anyone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports, George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied marn in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a “lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting, "that I can scarcely see to write." But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discovery of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it's very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let's not look at this through a 21st century lens Fuente: squidsticks 117,177 notas Dammit straight people

Dammit straight people

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England, Stephen, and Target: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens

squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard ...

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England, Stephen, and Tumblr: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens

squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard ...

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Family, Food, and Life: THE TARANTULA KILLERS OF TEXAS. BY DR. G. LINCECUM. The Mud Dauber, Pompilus formosus. From SAY. An investigation of the extensive family of Mud Daubers would be an interesting and instructive study. It would necessarily include that of the various types of Spiders, from the great hairy Mygale Hentzii, down to the small- est, almost microscopic species; for nearly every type of Spiders has its special enemy among the Mud Daubers. The large, red-winged "Tarantula Killer" (the Pompi- lus formosus of Say) is, as far as I know, the largest of the dauber group. It takes its prey by stinging, thus instantly paralyzing every limb of its victim. The effects of the introduction of its venom is as sudden as the snap of the electric spark. The wasp then drags it, going back- wards to some suitable place, excavates a hole five inches deep in the earth, places its great spider in it, deposits an egg under one of its legs, near the body, and then AMERICAN NAT., VOL. I. 18 darwinsdilemma: The Tarantula Killers of Texas An excellent example of behavioral fine tuning during descent with modification (evolution) Spiders are considered apex predators of the small world inhabited by insects and other small terrestrial arthropods. But, being a spider has its hazards. One of those are the mud daubers, the name from my grandmother that I first knew them by. Some of these predatory wasps are members of Hymenoptera family Pompilidae and go by the common name of spider wasps. These winged marauders hunt down and kill spiders that are often larger than themselves to provide a sufficient cache of food sufficient for one of their larvae over its entire five instar stage development, i.e., one big spider for each descendent. Adult spider wasps feed on plants. Pompilid wasps are atypical among families of insect Order Hymenoptera that evolved eusocial behavior in the Cretaceous Period. (also see Evolutionary Origins of Eusociality in Insects). Rather, they lead a solitary life. Classification: Class Insecta, Order Hymenoptera, Suborder Apocrita, Superfamily Vespoidea (see note), Family Pompilidae Note: Ribosomal RNA analysis indicates that Vespoidea is paraphyletic (i.e., members have no common ancestor) and should be resolved into multiple superfamilies. Upper image is from a 1867 issue of American Naturalist (Vol. 1, No. 3, May, 1867, pp. 137-141) article entitled The Tarantula Killers of Texas, by G. LincecumLower image: Spider wasp airlifting spider prey, by Peter Wöhrer
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