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Candy, New York, and Taken: JRehling @JRehling THREAD In 2016, Trump posted a photo of himself that gave away more than he intended. An open desk drawer revealed box after box of Sudafed, piled on top of one another. 11:32 AM Oct 5, 2019 - Twitter Web App 8.1K Retweets 18.9K Likes JRehling @JRehling 23h Replying to @JRehling Even stranger, although the photo was taken in New York, the boxes include a type that is only sold in the United Kingdom, with a different box and distinctive ingredients not found in the U.S. SUDAFED MUCUS RELIEF DAY& NIGHT Capsules Paracetamol, Caffeine & Phenylephrine Reduces mucus Two different capsules-one for day and one for night 16 capsules DAY NIGHT t 486 89 2.4K JRehling @JRehling 23h Sudafed is sometimes used for a high that includes increased alertness, but also has a side effect of pupil dilation t 481 65 2.8K JRehling @JRehling 23h Abuse of this drug was rare, but in order to limits its abuse, regulations were passed limiting the frequency in which an individual could purchase it, and requiring the individual show ID. t270 68 1.9K JRehling @JRehling 23h The desk drawer full of Sudafed, including boxes in New York purchased in the UK indicate that the legal limits of purchase are being circumvented, and that the then-candidate Trump was abusing Sudafed for its high rather than its decongestant effect 27 t490 2.9K JRehling @JRehling 23h From addictionhope.com "A sign of abuse of this drug might be finding a large amount of cold medicine drug packaging among someone's belongings." Addiction Hope: Resources for Those Struggling.. Addiction Hope is an online recovery & support resource site. You'll find education about addicti... addictionhope.com 4 t278 2.1K JRehling @JRehling 23h Beyond pupil dilation, more serious side effects include hallucinations and paranoid psychosis It is very concerning for the entire planet that someone with access to nuclear weapons is showing signs of abusing a drug that leads to paranoid psychosis 16 L 719 4.1K JRehling @JRehling 23h A desk drawer full of a controlled substance, however benign, shows signs that someone is systematically circumventing the law. The side effects of a cold drug are particularly concerning in this case, is a threat to the security of the United States and the world. [END] and this ti394 43 2.7K JRehling @JRehling 23h Note: These observations are not original or complete. @CaslerNoel has posted on this previously, with additional details and deserves all credit for noticing this earlier. NoelCaslerComedy @CaslerNoel Sep 9 Trump snorted Adderall all thru the day on 'Apprentice' he also ate UK. Sudafed like candy. But at night and at parties he switched to cocaine and high-end Methamphetamine that was hand-delivered by Bikers. The point is he was always high. That hasn't changed. @realDonaldTrump 1687 3.2K 45 JRehling @JRehling 16h Replying to @JRehling In response to many who have wondered if the photo is real, it is still up on Trump's Twitter timeline. twitter.com/realdonaldtrum... chaoswolf1982: liberalsarecool: catbirdseat4u: ➣ NBD people…  Just the latest thing trending on Twitter ➣ Oh, and you can access Trump’s original tweet HERE. #SudafedHead Trump is not well. #Sudafed #addict Trump was never well. It’s just that now the proof is coming out.

chaoswolf1982: liberalsarecool: catbirdseat4u: ➣ NBD people…  Just the latest thing trending on Twitter ➣ Oh, and you can access Trump’s...

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Anime, Cartoon Network, and Love: COhen lwas a Kid hada big Spongebob plushie that Jeasth laved to was obsessed with Spongebob... Spongebob tooth brush paste! Ceadouod Pis! Sponge bob Bday Party! 0ριροφ ρυν could However, whe never AME-AVEmy undying CAPTAIN! love fo Sponge bob YoU READY KIDSP was not shared with my Mother... Ias ked her to comment and she stated: tgrates my 5ου His tormenting laugh haunts my dreams to this day "One day I came home from School and my s ponge bob plosh was missing from my bed./ \SPO0ONGEBOB! Searched everywhere but he was nowhere to be found... never Saw him ALWE! again... Years later,mother asked me to bring down my pillow covers So she could wash them ZI||I Spongebob wasn't misst na... He was murdered She amputate his limbs and nose and turned him into a pillow. Ga Istill cant believe yoo di that. lwas overcome with rage someoneintheshadow456: dysphoric-varian: dysphoric-rohan: dasha-henshins: outofpocket-prince: dysphoric-rohan: such-justice-wow: roselph: a murder mystery Uhhh that’s super fucked up if true. Imagine destroying your child’s toys and brushing it off I mean this is genuinely abusive. You can laugh it off now, but your parent destroyed your beloved possession just because your interests didn’t match theirs and they couldn’t manage their emotions. That’s a horrible way to treat your child. Ya that is fucked up :) but seriously you guys have some weird impressions of what parents are. They are dumbass adults who grew biological polyps. They are allowed to have feelings. Yeah turning SpongeBob into a Dexter pillow is not a stellar response to grateing nautical laughter, but it didn’t hurt anyone, and they can laugh about it now, what secret psychological dagger do you think was rammed into their heart? Abuse is more then being petty, it is more than being mean. Emotional parental abuse fucks you over about as much as physical one, but we just don’t talk about it. Don’t excuse abuse with “they’re just human and have feelings”. I have feelings, too, but do I break things belonging to my loved ones? Do I rip off the arms and legs of my fiancee’s or my brothers’ action figures and plushes? No! Because I love those people and treat their things with respect. It 100% does hurt people. Can you not imagine the pain of being a child and having your favourite stuffed toy go missing? Can you imagine the trauma of seeing your favourite stuffed toy mutilated when you’re just a child?Not respecting somebody’s belongings or going out of your way to destroy or get rid of somebody’s belongings is abuse. I know this because I was abused and this was done to me as part of my abuser’s control over me.Yes, abuse is more than being mean. Glad you mentioned that. Abuse is being mean, to somebody you’re supposed to love and care for, and who trusts you deeply. You’ve proved my point. Tearing up your kids toy is the same as destroying your fiances xbox. My mom practically grounded me every time I watched Cartoon Network because she thought it was annoying. My parents used to bully me for liking anime and even told me that the only way to get people to like me is to abandon it and become “normal, instead of watching stupid trash.” When I mentioned my classmates making fun of me they said “of course they will if you continue to watch garbage.” Worst part was that the lesson I ACTUALLY needed to learn was “be considerate about others, not everyone likes the same thing as you, there’s a time and place to talk about your interests.” But they didn’t know how to teach that to me and thought if they verbally abused me I’d somehow get the message from that.
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Paris, Belongings, and City: Paris inhabitant packs essential belongings before leaving the city to avoid the riots. Circa 2018

Paris inhabitant packs essential belongings before leaving the city to avoid the riots. Circa 2018

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Anaconda, Crime, and Fail: 7 Ways Police Will Break the Law, Threaten, or Lie to You to Get What they Want Cops routinely break the law. Here's how. By Larken Rose / The Free Thought ProjectOctober 19, 2015 libertarirynn: gvldngrl: wolfoverdose: rikodeine: seemeflow: Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced to testify against himself, and because of the Fourth Amendment, no one’s records or belongings may legally be searched or seized without just cause. However, American police are trained to use methods of deception, intimidation and manipulation to circumvent these restrictions. In other words, cops routinely break the law—in letter and in spirit—in the name of enforcing the law. Several examples of this are widely known, if not widely understood. 1) “Do you know why I stopped you?”Cops ask this, not because they want to have a friendly chat, but because they want you to incriminate yourself. They are hoping you will “voluntarily” confess to having broken the law, whether it was something they had already noticed or not. You may think you are apologizing, or explaining, or even making excuses, but from the cop’s perspective, you are confessing. He is not there to serve you; he is there fishing for an excuse to fine or arrest you. In asking you the familiar question, he is essentially asking you what crime you just committed. And he will do this without giving you any “Miranda” warning, in an effort to trick you into testifying against yourself. 2) “Do you have something to hide?”Police often talk as if you need a good reason for not answering whatever questions they ask, or for not consenting to a warrantless search of your person, your car, or even your home. The ridiculous implication is that if you haven’t committed a crime, you should be happy to be subjected to random interrogations and searches. This turns the concept of due process on its head, as the cop tries to put the burden on you to prove your innocence, while implying that your failure to “cooperate” with random harassment must be evidence of guilt. 3) “Cooperating will make things easier on you.”The logical converse of this statement implies that refusing to answer questions and refusing to consent to a search will make things more difficult for you. In other words, you will be punished if you exercise your rights. Of course, if they coerce you into giving them a reason to fine or arrest you, they will claim that you “voluntarily” answered questions and “consented” to a search, and will pretend there was no veiled threat of what they might do to you if you did not willingly “cooperate.”(Such tactics are also used by prosecutors and judges via the procedure of “plea-bargaining,” whereby someone accused of a crime is essentially told that if he confesses guilt—thus relieving the government of having to present evidence or prove anything—then his suffering will be reduced. In fact, “plea bargaining” is illegal in many countries precisely because it basically constitutes coerced confessions.) 4) “We’ll just get a warrant.”Cops may try to persuade you to “consent” to a search by claiming that they could easily just go get a warrant if you don’t consent. This is just another ploy to intimidate people into surrendering their rights, with the implication again being that whoever inconveniences the police by requiring them to go through the process of getting a warrant will receive worse treatment than one who “cooperates.” But by definition, one who is threatened or intimidated into “consenting” has not truly consented to anything. 5.) We have someone who will testify against youPolice “informants” are often individuals whose own legal troubles have put them in a position where they can be used by the police to circumvent and undermine the constitutional rights of others. For example, once the police have something to hold over one individual, they can then bully that individual into giving false, anonymous testimony which can be used to obtain search warrants to use against others. Even if the informant gets caught lying, the police can say they didn’t know, making this tactic cowardly and illegal, but also very effective at getting around constitutional restrictions. 6) “We can hold you for 72 hours without charging you.”Based only on claimed suspicion, even without enough evidence or other probable cause to charge you with a crime, the police can kidnap you—or threaten to kidnap you—and use that to persuade you to confess to some relatively minor offense. Using this tactic, which borders on being torture, police can obtain confessions they know to be false, from people whose only concern, then and there, is to be released. 7) “I’m going to search you for my own safety.”Using so-called “Terry frisks” (named after the Supreme Court case of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1), police can carry out certain limited searches, without any warrant or probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed, under the guise of checking for weapons. By simply asserting that someone might have a weapon, police can disregard and circumvent the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches. U.S. courts have gone back and forth in deciding how often, and in what circumstances, tactics like those mentioned above are acceptable. And of course, police continually go far beyond anything the courts have declared to be “legal” anyway. But aside from nitpicking legal technicalities, both coerced confessions and unreasonable searches are still unconstitutional, and therefore “illegal,” regardless of the rationale or excuses used to try to justify them. Yet, all too often, cops show that to them, the Fourth and Fifth Amendments—and any other restrictions on their power—are simply technical inconveniences for them to try to get around. In other words, they will break the law whenever they can get away with it if it serves their own agenda and power, and they will ironically insist that they need to do that in order to catch “law-breakers” (the kind who don’t wear badges). Of course, if the above tactics fail, police can simply bully people into confessing—falsely or truthfully—and/or carry out unconstitutional searches, knowing that the likelihood of cops having to face any punishment for doing so is extremely low. Usually all that happens, even when a search was unquestionably and obviously illegal, or when a confession was clearly coerced, is that any evidence obtained from the illegal search or forced confession is excluded from being allowed at trial. Of course, if there is no trial—either because the person plea-bargains or because there was no evidence and no crime—the “exclusionary rule” creates no deterrent at all. The police can, and do, routinely break the law and violate individual rights, knowing that there will be no adverse repercussions for them having done so. Likewise, the police can lie under oath, plant evidence, falsely charge people with “resisting arrest” or “assaulting an officer,” and commit other blatantly illegal acts, knowing full well that their fellow gang members—officers, prosecutors and judges—will almost never hold them accountable for their crimes. Even much of the general public still presumes innocence when it comes to cops accused of wrong-doing, while presuming guilt when the cops accuse someone else of wrong-doing. But this is gradually changing, as the amount of video evidence showing the true nature of the “Street Gang in Blue” becomes too much even for many police-apologists to ignore. http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want One of the biggest realizations with dealing with cops for me was the fact that they CAN lie, they are 100% legally entitled to lie, and they WILL whether you’re a victim of crime, accused of committing a crime or anything else Everyone needs to reblog this, it could save a life. Important Seriously if you ever find yourself in custody don’t say shit until you’ve got some counsel with you. No cop is your friend in that situation.
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America, Ass, and Books: Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall Hey guys, I know l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because l wanted to share something So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day. Every single day I sit there Now, l also sit next to some foreign guy that 4/9/18, 6:22 AM 83.9K Retweets 151K Likes Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d 、 barely speaks English. The most advanced thing l've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really good" This guy also has a habit of stackin;g every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk space 5 t 743 9,104 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d Now, every single time l walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this quy gives me a high five 714 10.8K Thomas McFall @thomasmcfall 5d Tweet your reply Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. l'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning" Just get your shit off my desk 682 8,716 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. I'm standing outside because l had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the corner of my eye. Of course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual 4 1652 8,168 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the door. Tweet your reply 0 The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting down and says "I'm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." t 1,125 19.5K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me. He was saving me the seat every morning And this whole time he saw me as a friend but I was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration Cheesy as it sounds, I was touched 38 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d ﹀ l ended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said "Ah, Tom You here. Okay." And I did get a high five 02,686 41.1KT At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me We did. And we talked for a while. I got through the broken English 4 0795 15.2K Tweet your reply The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his all his left over money back home to his wife 6 875 18.1K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d | asked him how he liked America as well He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said "Not every American is nice to me like you are, Tom. I bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition 16 0994 23.2K Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall 5d Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend Tweet your reply positive-memes: Student finds annoying foreigner is a friend he didn’t know he had.
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America, Ass, and Books: Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall Hey guys, I know l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because l wanted to share something So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day. Every single day I sit there Now, l also sit next to some foreign guy that 4/9/18, 6:22 AM 83.9K Retweets 151K Likes Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d 、 barely speaks English. The most advanced thing l've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really good" This guy also has a habit of stackin;g every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk space 5 t 743 9,104 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d Now, every single time l walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this quy gives me a high five 714 10.8K Thomas McFall @thomasmcfall 5d Tweet your reply Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. l'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning" Just get your shit off my desk 682 8,716 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. I'm standing outside because l had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the corner of my eye. Of course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual 4 1652 8,168 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the door. Tweet your reply 0 The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting down and says "I'm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." t 1,125 19.5K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me. He was saving me the seat every morning And this whole time he saw me as a friend but I was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration Cheesy as it sounds, I was touched 38 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d ﹀ l ended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said "Ah, Tom You here. Okay." And I did get a high five 02,686 41.1KT At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me We did. And we talked for a while. I got through the broken English 4 0795 15.2K Tweet your reply The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his all his left over money back home to his wife 6 875 18.1K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d | asked him how he liked America as well He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said "Not every American is nice to me like you are, Tom. I bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition 16 0994 23.2K Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall 5d Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend Tweet your reply <p><a href="https://positive-memes.tumblr.com/post/172967650881/student-finds-annoying-foreigner-is-a-friend-he" class="tumblr_blog">positive-memes</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Student finds annoying foreigner is a friend he didn’t know he had.</p></blockquote>
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America, Ass, and Books: Hey guys, I know l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because I wanted to share So in one of my Management classes I sit in the same seat in the front every day Every single day l sit there. Now, I also sit next to some foreign guy barely speaks English. The most advanced thing I've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really This guy also has a habit of stacking every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk Now, every single time l walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay. And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this guy gives me a high five. Thomas McFall @thomas mcfal 0d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. I'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning Just got your shit off my dosk Thomas McFall thomas mcfal 6d But today I cane to class and was running a fow minutes late. Im standing ouAside because I had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the docr out of the corner of my eye. O course, my desk was filled with his Thomas McFall As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting don and says "Tm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." 4/18 1122pm It was then that i realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me He was saving me the seat every And this whole time he saw me as a friend but I was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration Cheesy as it sounds, Iwas touched. /418 31:22 pm lended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And I did get a At the end of class lended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me. We did. And we talked for a whle.I got through the broken English The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his all his left over money back home to his l asked him how he liked America as well. He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said "Not every American is nice to me like you l bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition. Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yoursef t took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and reaize this guy was just trying to be my friend. Better late than never l suppose 4/18, 1122 pm Wholesome Twitter
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Anaconda, Crime, and Fail: 7 Ways Police Will Break the Law, Threaten, or Lie to You to Get What they Want Cops routinely break the law. Here's how. By Larken Rose / The Free Thought ProjectOctober 19, 2015 peteschult: libertarirynn: gvldngrl: wolfoverdose: rikodeine: seemeflow: Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced to testify against himself, and because of the Fourth Amendment, no one’s records or belongings may legally be searched or seized without just cause. However, American police are trained to use methods of deception, intimidation and manipulation to circumvent these restrictions. In other words, cops routinely break the law—in letter and in spirit—in the name of enforcing the law. Several examples of this are widely known, if not widely understood. 1) “Do you know why I stopped you?”Cops ask this, not because they want to have a friendly chat, but because they want you to incriminate yourself. They are hoping you will “voluntarily” confess to having broken the law, whether it was something they had already noticed or not. You may think you are apologizing, or explaining, or even making excuses, but from the cop’s perspective, you are confessing. He is not there to serve you; he is there fishing for an excuse to fine or arrest you. In asking you the familiar question, he is essentially asking you what crime you just committed. And he will do this without giving you any “Miranda” warning, in an effort to trick you into testifying against yourself. 2) “Do you have something to hide?”Police often talk as if you need a good reason for not answering whatever questions they ask, or for not consenting to a warrantless search of your person, your car, or even your home. The ridiculous implication is that if you haven’t committed a crime, you should be happy to be subjected to random interrogations and searches. This turns the concept of due process on its head, as the cop tries to put the burden on you to prove your innocence, while implying that your failure to “cooperate” with random harassment must be evidence of guilt. 3) “Cooperating will make things easier on you.”The logical converse of this statement implies that refusing to answer questions and refusing to consent to a search will make things more difficult for you. In other words, you will be punished if you exercise your rights. Of course, if they coerce you into giving them a reason to fine or arrest you, they will claim that you “voluntarily” answered questions and “consented” to a search, and will pretend there was no veiled threat of what they might do to you if you did not willingly “cooperate.”(Such tactics are also used by prosecutors and judges via the procedure of “plea-bargaining,” whereby someone accused of a crime is essentially told that if he confesses guilt—thus relieving the government of having to present evidence or prove anything—then his suffering will be reduced. In fact, “plea bargaining” is illegal in many countries precisely because it basically constitutes coerced confessions.) 4) “We’ll just get a warrant.”Cops may try to persuade you to “consent” to a search by claiming that they could easily just go get a warrant if you don’t consent. This is just another ploy to intimidate people into surrendering their rights, with the implication again being that whoever inconveniences the police by requiring them to go through the process of getting a warrant will receive worse treatment than one who “cooperates.” But by definition, one who is threatened or intimidated into “consenting” has not truly consented to anything. 5.) We have someone who will testify against youPolice “informants” are often individuals whose own legal troubles have put them in a position where they can be used by the police to circumvent and undermine the constitutional rights of others. For example, once the police have something to hold over one individual, they can then bully that individual into giving false, anonymous testimony which can be used to obtain search warrants to use against others. Even if the informant gets caught lying, the police can say they didn’t know, making this tactic cowardly and illegal, but also very effective at getting around constitutional restrictions. 6) “We can hold you for 72 hours without charging you.”Based only on claimed suspicion, even without enough evidence or other probable cause to charge you with a crime, the police can kidnap you—or threaten to kidnap you—and use that to persuade you to confess to some relatively minor offense. Using this tactic, which borders on being torture, police can obtain confessions they know to be false, from people whose only concern, then and there, is to be released. 7) “I’m going to search you for my own safety.”Using so-called “Terry frisks” (named after the Supreme Court case of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1), police can carry out certain limited searches, without any warrant or probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed, under the guise of checking for weapons. By simply asserting that someone might have a weapon, police can disregard and circumvent the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches. U.S. courts have gone back and forth in deciding how often, and in what circumstances, tactics like those mentioned above are acceptable. And of course, police continually go far beyond anything the courts have declared to be “legal” anyway. But aside from nitpicking legal technicalities, both coerced confessions and unreasonable searches are still unconstitutional, and therefore “illegal,” regardless of the rationale or excuses used to try to justify them. Yet, all too often, cops show that to them, the Fourth and Fifth Amendments—and any other restrictions on their power—are simply technical inconveniences for them to try to get around. In other words, they will break the law whenever they can get away with it if it serves their own agenda and power, and they will ironically insist that they need to do that in order to catch “law-breakers” (the kind who don’t wear badges). Of course, if the above tactics fail, police can simply bully people into confessing—falsely or truthfully—and/or carry out unconstitutional searches, knowing that the likelihood of cops having to face any punishment for doing so is extremely low. Usually all that happens, even when a search was unquestionably and obviously illegal, or when a confession was clearly coerced, is that any evidence obtained from the illegal search or forced confession is excluded from being allowed at trial. Of course, if there is no trial—either because the person plea-bargains or because there was no evidence and no crime—the “exclusionary rule” creates no deterrent at all. The police can, and do, routinely break the law and violate individual rights, knowing that there will be no adverse repercussions for them having done so. Likewise, the police can lie under oath, plant evidence, falsely charge people with “resisting arrest” or “assaulting an officer,” and commit other blatantly illegal acts, knowing full well that their fellow gang members—officers, prosecutors and judges—will almost never hold them accountable for their crimes. Even much of the general public still presumes innocence when it comes to cops accused of wrong-doing, while presuming guilt when the cops accuse someone else of wrong-doing. But this is gradually changing, as the amount of video evidence showing the true nature of the “Street Gang in Blue” becomes too much even for many police-apologists to ignore. http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want One of the biggest realizations with dealing with cops for me was the fact that they CAN lie, they are 100% legally entitled to lie, and they WILL whether you’re a victim of crime, accused of committing a crime or anything else Everyone needs to reblog this, it could save a life. Important Seriously if you ever find yourself in custody don’t say shit until you’ve got some counsel with you. No cop is your friend in that situation. Cops are *never* your friends. And they are under no obligation to protect you. Ever. Get rid of pigs!
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America, Ass, and Books: Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall Hey guys, I know l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because l wanted to share something So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day. Every single day I sit there Now, l also sit next to some foreign guy that 4/9/18, 6:22 AM 83.9K Retweets 151K Likes Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d 、 barely speaks English. The most advanced thing l've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really good" This guy also has a habit of stackin;g every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk space 5 t 743 9,104 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d Now, every single time l walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this quy gives me a high five 714 10.8K Thomas McFall @thomasmcfall 5d Tweet your reply Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. l'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning" Just get your shit off my desk 682 8,716 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. I'm standing outside because l had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the corner of my eye. Of course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual 4 1652 8,168 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the door. Tweet your reply 0 The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting down and says "I'm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." t 1,125 19.5K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me. He was saving me the seat every morning And this whole time he saw me as a friend but I was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration Cheesy as it sounds, I was touched 38 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d ﹀ l ended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said "Ah, Tom You here. Okay." And I did get a high five 02,686 41.1KT At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me We did. And we talked for a while. I got through the broken English 4 0795 15.2K Tweet your reply The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his all his left over money back home to his wife 6 875 18.1K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d | asked him how he liked America as well He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said "Not every American is nice to me like you are, Tom. I bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition 16 0994 23.2K Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall 5d Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend Tweet your reply positive-memes:Student finds annoying foreigner is a friend he didn’t know he had.
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America, Ass, and Books: Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall Hey guys, I know l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because l wanted to share something So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day. Every single day I sit there Now, l also sit next to some foreign guy that 4/9/18, 6:22 AM 83.9K Retweets 151K Likes Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d 、 barely speaks English. The most advanced thing l've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really good" This guy also has a habit of stackin;g every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk space 5 t 743 9,104 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d Now, every single time l walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this quy gives me a high five 714 10.8K Thomas McFall @thomasmcfall 5d Tweet your reply Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. l'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning" Just get your shit off my desk 682 8,716 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. I'm standing outside because l had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the corner of my eye. Of course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual 4 1652 8,168 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the door. Tweet your reply 0 The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting down and says "I'm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." t 1,125 19.5K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me. He was saving me the seat every morning And this whole time he saw me as a friend but I was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration Cheesy as it sounds, I was touched 38 Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall. 5d ﹀ l ended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said "Ah, Tom You here. Okay." And I did get a high five 02,686 41.1KT At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me We did. And we talked for a while. I got through the broken English 4 0795 15.2K Tweet your reply The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his all his left over money back home to his wife 6 875 18.1K Thomas McFall @thomas mcfall 5d | asked him how he liked America as well He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said "Not every American is nice to me like you are, Tom. I bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition 16 0994 23.2K Thomas McFall @thomas_mcfall 5d Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend Tweet your reply positive-memes:Student finds annoying foreigner is a friend he didn’t know he had.
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America, Ass, and Books: Hey guys, Iknow l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because I wanted to share So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day.Every single day l sit there. Now, I also sit next to some foreign guy Thomas McFall barely speaks English. The most advanced thing I've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really This guy also has a habit of stacking every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk 9/4/18, 1122 pm Thomas McFall Now, every single time I walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this guy gives me a high five. Thomas McFall @thomas mcfal 8d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. I'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning Just get your shit oft my desk Thomas McFall @thomas mcfal 8d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. Im standing outside because I had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the comer of my eye. O course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual. Thomas McFall As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting don and says "Tm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." 9/4/18, 11:22 pm It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me He was saving me the seat every And this whole time he saw me as a friend butl was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration. Cheesy as it sounds, Iwas touched. 4/18, 11:22 pm Thomas McFa lended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said 'Ah Tom. You here. Okay" AndI did get a high five. At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me. We did. And we talked for a while.I got through the broken English Thomas McFall The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his al his left over money back home to his 9/4/18, 11:22 pm I asked him how he liked America as well. He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said Not every American is nice to me like you l bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition. Thomas McFall Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend. Better late than never l suppose. 94/18, 11:22 pm <p>Wholesome twitter via /r/wholesomememes <a href="https://ift.tt/2JMYuNH">https://ift.tt/2JMYuNH</a></p>
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America, Ass, and Books: Hey guys, Iknow l usually just post shitty jokes on my Twitter but bear with me because I wanted to share So in one of my Management classes l sit in the same seat in the front every day.Every single day l sit there. Now, I also sit next to some foreign guy Thomas McFall barely speaks English. The most advanced thing I've heard this guy say in English is "Wow, my muffin is really This guy also has a habit of stacking every item he owns in the exact space l sit. His bag, his food, his books, and his phone are ALWAYS right on my desk 9/4/18, 1122 pm Thomas McFall Now, every single time I walk into class this guy says "Ah, Tom. You here. Okay." And starts frantically clearing my desk of his belongings. He then makes it a habit to say "Ready for class, yeah?" And gives me a high five. Every day this guy gives me a high five. Thomas McFall @thomas mcfal 8d I was ALWAYS annoyed with this guy. I'm thinking "Dude, you know I sit in this seat every day. Why are you always stacking your shit here? And the last thing I want to do is give a guy who barely speaks my language high fives at 8 in the morning Just get your shit oft my desk Thomas McFall @thomas mcfal 8d But today I came to class and was running a few minutes late. Im standing outside because I had to send a quick text. I could see my usual space through the door out of the comer of my eye. O course, my desk was filled with his belongings. The usual. Thomas McFall As I'm standing there on my phone another guy who was also late walks into the class before me and tried to take my seat since it's closest to the The guy sitting next to me stops this dude from sitting don and says "Tm sorry. My good friend Thomas sits here." 9/4/18, 11:22 pm It was then that I realized this guy wasn't putting stuff on my seat to annoy me He was saving me the seat every And this whole time he saw me as a friend butl was too busy thinking about myself to take him into consideration. Cheesy as it sounds, Iwas touched. 4/18, 11:22 pm Thomas McFa lended up going into class and of course he cleared the seat and said 'Ah Tom. You here. Okay" AndI did get a high five. At the end of class l ended up asking him if he wanted to get a bite to eat with me. We did. And we talked for a while.I got through the broken English Thomas McFall The guy moved here from the Middle East to pursue a college education in America. He plans to go back after he gets his degree. He's got two kids and a wife. He works full time and sends his al his left over money back home to his 9/4/18, 11:22 pm I asked him how he liked America as well. He said he misses his family but it's exciting to be here. He also said Not every American is nice to me like you l bought lunch, of course. Dude deserves it. He gave me a high five for buying lunch. Gotta keep up tradition. Thomas McFall Moral of the story? Don't do what I do and constantly only think about yourself It took me nearly the entire semester to get my head out of my ass and realize this guy was just trying to be my friend. Better late than never l suppose. 94/18, 11:22 pm <p>Wholesome twitter</p>
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Bad, Energy, and Goals: What is AUTISTIC BURNOUT? a guide from Autism Women's Network signs Lack of motivation (hard to care about goals when everyday life is overwhelming e Loss of executive functioning abilities (decision-making, organization, etc.) Difficulty with self-care . Easier to reach overload or meltdown Loss of speech, selective mutism Lethargy, exhaustion e Illness, digestive issues . Memory loss Inability to maintain masks or use social skills . Overall seeming "more autistic" or stereotypical May have period of high energy before collapse causesS Passing as neurotypical /suppressing autistic traits . Doing 'too much', too much stress . Aging: needing more downtime, having less energy ....c...Changes, good or bad (relationships, jobs, living arrangements, belongings, environment, routines...) . Sleep deprivation, poor nutrition, dehydration . Illness . Sensory or emotional overload . Time strategies Scheduling breaks, managing spoons . Leave of absence . Stimming, sensory diet . Exercise . Massage Reminders and supports . Routines . Better environment/job/etc. Boundaries, saying 'no Dropping the mask/façade e Solitude . Absolute quiet Creative projects, passions, special interests Paying attention to reactions and your body Sources: "Autistic Burnout- Are You Going Burnout? Anonymously Autistic. Endow, Judy. Autistic Burnout and Aging. Ollibean. Help! I seem to be getting more ssion and Fluid Adaptation." Musings of an Aspie. Schaber, Amythest. "Ask an Autistic #3-what is urnout? Thanks toia dsey All ReAWNNebraska ford p ng this guides of anti ne. haber, Amythest skan Autistic #3 what is autistic American Asperg tistic Autistic Burnout?" Thanks to Lindsey Allen, AWN Nebraska for compiling this guide. o Autism Women's Network 2017 thegooddoctorimagines:While this is from the Autism Women’s Network, it includes other genders as well.

thegooddoctorimagines:While this is from the Autism Women’s Network, it includes other genders as well.

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Anaconda, Crime, and Fail: 7 Ways Police Will Break the Law, Threaten, or Lie to You to Get What they Want Cops routinely break the law. Here's how. By Larken Rose / The Free Thought ProjectOctober 19, 2015 <p><a href="http://gvldngrl.tumblr.com/post/166513263494/wolfoverdose-rikodeine-seemeflow-because" class="tumblr_blog">gvldngrl</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://wolfoverdose.tumblr.com/post/166265395771/rikodeine-seemeflow-because-of-the-fifth" class="tumblr_blog">wolfoverdose</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://rikodeine.tumblr.com/post/131562629300">rikodeine</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://seemeflow.tumblr.com/post/131556627065">seemeflow</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><b>Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced to testify against himself, and because of the Fourth Amendment, no one’s records or belongings may legally be searched or seized without just cause. However, American police are trained to use methods of deception, intimidation and manipulation to circumvent these restrictions. In other words, cops routinely break the law—in letter and in spirit—in the name of enforcing the law. Several examples of this are widely known, if not widely understood.</b></p> <p><b>1) “Do you know why I stopped you?”</b><br/>Cops ask this, not because they want to have a friendly chat, but because they want you to incriminate yourself. They are hoping you will “voluntarily” confess to having broken the law, whether it was something they had already noticed or not. You may think you are apologizing, or explaining, or even making excuses, but from the cop’s perspective, you are confessing. He is not there to serve you; he is there fishing for an excuse to fine or arrest you. In asking you the familiar question, he is essentially asking you what crime you just committed. And he will do this without giving you any “Miranda” warning, in an effort to trick you into testifying against yourself.</p> <p><b>2) “Do you have something to hide?”</b><br/>Police often talk as if you need a good reason for not answering whatever questions they ask, or for not consenting to a warrantless search of your person, your car, or even your home. The ridiculous implication is that if you haven’t committed a crime, you should be happy to be subjected to random interrogations and searches. This turns the concept of due process on its head, as the cop tries to put the burden on you to prove your innocence, while implying that your failure to “cooperate” with random harassment must be evidence of guilt.</p> <p><b>3) “Cooperating will make things easier on you.”</b><br/>The logical converse of this statement implies that refusing to answer questions and refusing to consent to a search will make things more difficult for you. In other words, you will be punished if you exercise your rights. Of course, if they coerce you into giving them a reason to fine or arrest you, they will claim that you “voluntarily” answered questions and “consented” to a search, and will pretend there was no veiled threat of what they might do to you if you did not willingly “cooperate.”<br/>(Such tactics are also used by prosecutors and judges via the procedure of “plea-bargaining,” whereby someone accused of a crime is essentially told that if he confesses guilt—thus relieving the government of having to present evidence or prove anything—then his suffering will be reduced. In fact, “plea bargaining” is illegal in many countries precisely because it basically constitutes coerced confessions.)</p> <p><b>4) “We’ll just get a warrant.”</b><br/>Cops may try to persuade you to “consent” to a search by claiming that they could easily just go get a warrant if you don’t consent. This is just another ploy to intimidate people into surrendering their rights, with the implication again being that whoever inconveniences the police by requiring them to go through the process of getting a warrant will receive worse treatment than one who “cooperates.” But by definition, one who is threatened or intimidated into “consenting” has not truly consented to anything.</p> <p><b>5.) We have someone who will testify against you</b><br/>Police “informants” are often individuals whose own legal troubles have put them in a position where they can be used by the police to circumvent and undermine the constitutional rights of others. For example, once the police have something to hold over one individual, they can then bully that individual into giving false, anonymous testimony which can be used to obtain search warrants to use against others. Even if the informant gets caught lying, the police can say they didn’t know, making this tactic cowardly and illegal, but also very effective at getting around constitutional restrictions.</p> <p><b>6) “We can hold you for 72 hours without charging you.”</b><br/>Based only on claimed suspicion, even without enough evidence or other probable cause to charge you with a crime, the police can kidnap you—or threaten to kidnap you—and use that to persuade you to confess to some relatively minor offense. Using this tactic, which borders on being torture, police can obtain confessions they know to be false, from people whose only concern, then and there, is to be released.</p> <p><b>7) “I’m going to search you for my own safety.”</b><br/>Using so-called “Terry frisks” (named after the Supreme Court case of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1), police can carry out certain limited searches, without any warrant or probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed, under the guise of checking for weapons. By simply asserting that someone might have a weapon, police can disregard and circumvent the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches.</p> <p>U.S. courts have gone back and forth in deciding how often, and in what circumstances, tactics like those mentioned above are acceptable. And of course, police continually go far beyond anything the courts have declared to be “legal” anyway. But aside from nitpicking legal technicalities, both coerced confessions and unreasonable searches are still unconstitutional, and therefore “illegal,” regardless of the rationale or excuses used to try to justify them. Yet, all too often, cops show that to them, the Fourth and Fifth Amendments—and any other restrictions on their power—are simply technical inconveniences for them to try to get around. In other words, they will break the law whenever they can get away with it if it serves their own agenda and power, and they will ironically insist that they need to do that in order to catch “law-breakers” (the kind who don’t wear badges).</p> <p>Of course, if the above tactics fail, police can simply bully people into confessing—falsely or truthfully—and/or carry out unconstitutional searches, knowing that the likelihood of cops having to face any punishment for doing so is extremely low. Usually all that happens, even when a search was unquestionably and obviously illegal, or when a confession was clearly coerced, is that any evidence obtained from the illegal search or forced confession is excluded from being allowed at trial. Of course, if there is no trial—either because the person plea-bargains or because there was no evidence and no crime—the “exclusionary rule” creates no deterrent at all. The police can, and do, routinely break the law and violate individual rights, knowing that there will be no adverse repercussions for them having done so.</p> <p>Likewise, the police can lie under oath, plant evidence, falsely charge people with “resisting arrest” or “assaulting an officer,” and commit other blatantly illegal acts, knowing full well that their fellow gang members—officers, prosecutors and judges—will almost never hold them accountable for their crimes. Even much of the general public still presumes innocence when it comes to cops accused of wrong-doing, while presuming guilt when the cops accuse someone else of wrong-doing. But this is gradually changing, as the amount of video evidence showing the true nature of the “Street Gang in Blue” becomes too much even for many police-apologists to ignore.</p> <p><a href="http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want">http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want</a><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>One of the biggest realizations with dealing with cops for me was the fact that they CAN lie, they are 100% legally entitled to lie, and they WILL whether you’re a victim of crime, accused of committing a crime or anything else</p> </blockquote> <p>Everyone needs to reblog this, it could save a life.</p> </blockquote> <p>Important </p> </blockquote> <p>Seriously if you ever find yourself in custody don’t say shit until you’ve got some counsel with you. No cop is your friend in that situation.</p>
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Belongings, Italian, and Solider: An Italian solider packs his belongings on his way to the front (1915)

An Italian solider packs his belongings on his way to the front (1915)

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Auschwitz, Jewish, and Belongings: A German officer demands the belongings of a Jewish prisoner upon his arrival at Auschwitz (1943, colorized)

A German officer demands the belongings of a Jewish prisoner upon his arrival at Auschwitz (1943, colorized)

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