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galacticdustbunnies: merindab: velosarapter: leavesofecstasy: leavesofecstasy: So this is super cool Okay but I don’t think ya’ll appreciate this as much as you should! Figuring out the places of ancient buildings — Roman, Celtic etc — tends to be a bit of a challenge. You have to consider the fact that the land has changed quite a lot over the centuries, with buildings popping up here and there, the topography changing dramatically, rising and falling like no one’s business, forests and cliffs being cut down or collapsing into the sea. Basically, the descriptions we have of sites in old ass texts can be a nightmare to match up to modern day locations. Some, like Chester and London, are easy. We kept building on them. It’s why there’s an amphitheatre in the middle of Chester and the Roman Wall. But in other parts of the country its a heck of a lot harder to locate and identify places. There’s this show called Time Team (or sth like that, it’s been a long long time) and they basically went around the UK digging up ancient sites that they tried to find through radar and aerial imagery etc etc. That requires a fair amount of planning and technology (aka the bane of field budgets everywhere). And even with those and all the nice little people digging away and the photographs and radar imagery, they still had issues figuring out the direction a building went in, which way the wall ran, if this was part of a house or not and so on. The heatwave and drought about to happen if it doesn’t frickin rain, is useful in that it allows us to see these sites without loads of planning and resources as they are today. We can identify places we’ve not been able to identify, locate sites we’ve wanted to locate for ages, because of the nifty little thing the dirt does when it gets hot and dry and like Satan’s breathing on everything. And that means that those sites can be logged down, and the modern topography won’t be such a bitch to try and figure out for locations because that heatwave has saved a lot of time and effort! Basically, don’t be surprised if in the next year or so, there are more reports and research papers about archaeological digsites in the UK from the Bronze Age or the Iron Age because this right here, this damned benighted hellish summer heat, will have been the cause of it all. Which makes me a little more tolerant of Satan and his dick ass breathing. This BBC article has a nice explanation on how exactly these marks form, as well. This so so cool @learnwelsh I am sure you have seen this, but just in case : Mike Bird Birdyword This is so cool. The UK's current heatwave is exposing the outline of ancient hill forts and settlements. Soil quality today is still affected by iron age construction, so the grass on top changes colour at a different pace in the sun. HT @holland_tom rcahmw.gov.uk/cropmarks-2018/ Follow CBHC 3:53 AM-8 Jul 2018 2,997 Retweets 7,061 Likes9 galacticdustbunnies: merindab: velosarapter: leavesofecstasy: leavesofecstasy: So this is super cool Okay but I don’t think ya’ll appreciate this as much as you should! Figuring out the places of ancient buildings — Roman, Celtic etc — tends to be a bit of a challenge. You have to consider the fact that the land has changed quite a lot over the centuries, with buildings popping up here and there, the topography changing dramatically, rising and falling like no one’s business, forests and cliffs being cut down or collapsing into the sea. Basically, the descriptions we have of sites in old ass texts can be a nightmare to match up to modern day locations. Some, like Chester and London, are easy. We kept building on them. It’s why there’s an amphitheatre in the middle of Chester and the Roman Wall. But in other parts of the country its a heck of a lot harder to locate and identify places. There’s this show called Time Team (or sth like that, it’s been a long long time) and they basically went around the UK digging up ancient sites that they tried to find through radar and aerial imagery etc etc. That requires a fair amount of planning and technology (aka the bane of field budgets everywhere). And even with those and all the nice little people digging away and the photographs and radar imagery, they still had issues figuring out the direction a building went in, which way the wall ran, if this was part of a house or not and so on. The heatwave and drought about to happen if it doesn’t frickin rain, is useful in that it allows us to see these sites without loads of planning and resources as they are today. We can identify places we’ve not been able to identify, locate sites we’ve wanted to locate for ages, because of the nifty little thing the dirt does when it gets hot and dry and like Satan’s breathing on everything. And that means that those sites can be logged down, and the modern topography won’t be such a bitch to try and figure out for locations because that heatwave has saved a lot of time and effort! Basically, don’t be surprised if in the next year or so, there are more reports and research papers about archaeological digsites in the UK from the Bronze Age or the Iron Age because this right here, this damned benighted hellish summer heat, will have been the cause of it all. Which makes me a little more tolerant of Satan and his dick ass breathing. This BBC article has a nice explanation on how exactly these marks form, as well. This so so cool @learnwelsh I am sure you have seen this, but just in case
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Textile history: The Ionian Chiton. The Dorian Chiton. Costume. Chitons Marjorie & C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T Batsford, 1931) killerchickadee Wait, wait.. Is that seriously ? How their clothes go? yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body childrentalking lets bring back sheetwares ardatli When you're carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brillant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares) annathecrow How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? ardati Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we're still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India caled woven wind that was supposedly stil translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding nng The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution yells about textile history* Reblogging because its fascinating uidu-regani The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after al, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as westem China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies Can we talk about 18th century and regency era musin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It's so fine it's more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with n I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mmll Because it didn't fray lke our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it's horrid bmwiid I love this because we've gotten so blind to what makes 'good fabric now machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning. Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality- we use muslin as a throw away' before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn t even think it was the same stuff Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics. Satin? Silks?I Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY (I don't want to seem like I'm shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAYll but also, I'd love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin) archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it's fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. Textile history
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bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked. : The Ionian Chiton The Dorian Chiton. bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked.
Save
As we continue our celebration of Adam West's Batman legacy, it is important to remember that despite the campy nature of West's Caped Crusader, without the 60s "Batman" television series catapulting the character into popular culture and mass media, the Batman we enjoy today wouldn't exist. In fact, Batman probably would have gone into obscurity entering the Bronze Age of the 1970s. Frank Miller's 80s Dark Avenger (bottom panel) to Christian Bale's live action Dark Knight from the early 2000s wouldn't be recognized as groundbreaking stories or personas us as fans see them as today without Adam West providing not just comic fans but fans, young and old all over the world, a true crimefighter of Gotham City who responds to a call from the Batphone or the Bat Signal. Over 12,000 people, including myself, went to the tribute in Downtown Los Angeles last week to see the Bat Signal shine on Los Angeles City Hall remembering the Bright Knight that placed DC Comics' Batman into the iconic place in pop culture he is today. While we discuss Batman in comics weekly here on History of the Batman, most people know Batman from everything else but comics. They watch tv shows like Gotham, play the Batman Arkham video games and watch the DCEU films. But most importantly, everyone has seen Adam West's Batman tv show, seen him drive the Batmobile and have watched the Bat Signal turned on to shine in the sky. As some comic book fans try desperately to find a "comic" connection between the Adam West Bat-Signal on City Hall, there are no Easter Eggs in paying respects to someone who passed away in real life. The City of Los Angeles 10 times over has tuned in to the same Bat-time and same Bat-channel more than turned a page in issue four of Miller's "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns". Mourning doesn't have to be complex. It can be as simple as a gathering of people seeing a special light shine one last time for the man who brought Batman back to life. To be honest with you Gothamites, please don't disrespect West and his global legacy by forcibly overshadowing it with a panel or two because you "stan" over a particular creator. Just celebrate West for what he is, an icon. ✌🏼💙🦇🙏🏼: OUT IS ATMAN @HISTORY OFTHEBATMAN BATMAN OULDNT EXIST As we continue our celebration of Adam West's Batman legacy, it is important to remember that despite the campy nature of West's Caped Crusader, without the 60s "Batman" television series catapulting the character into popular culture and mass media, the Batman we enjoy today wouldn't exist. In fact, Batman probably would have gone into obscurity entering the Bronze Age of the 1970s. Frank Miller's 80s Dark Avenger (bottom panel) to Christian Bale's live action Dark Knight from the early 2000s wouldn't be recognized as groundbreaking stories or personas us as fans see them as today without Adam West providing not just comic fans but fans, young and old all over the world, a true crimefighter of Gotham City who responds to a call from the Batphone or the Bat Signal. Over 12,000 people, including myself, went to the tribute in Downtown Los Angeles last week to see the Bat Signal shine on Los Angeles City Hall remembering the Bright Knight that placed DC Comics' Batman into the iconic place in pop culture he is today. While we discuss Batman in comics weekly here on History of the Batman, most people know Batman from everything else but comics. They watch tv shows like Gotham, play the Batman Arkham video games and watch the DCEU films. But most importantly, everyone has seen Adam West's Batman tv show, seen him drive the Batmobile and have watched the Bat Signal turned on to shine in the sky. As some comic book fans try desperately to find a "comic" connection between the Adam West Bat-Signal on City Hall, there are no Easter Eggs in paying respects to someone who passed away in real life. The City of Los Angeles 10 times over has tuned in to the same Bat-time and same Bat-channel more than turned a page in issue four of Miller's "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns". Mourning doesn't have to be complex. It can be as simple as a gathering of people seeing a special light shine one last time for the man who brought Batman back to life. To be honest with you Gothamites, please don't disrespect West and his global legacy by forcibly overshadowing it with a panel or two because you "stan" over a particular creator. Just celebrate West for what he is, an icon. ✌🏼💙🦇🙏🏼

As we continue our celebration of Adam West's Batman legacy, it is important to remember that despite the campy nature of West's Caped Cr...

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Afternoon Gothamites and I hope you're all having a spectacular Sunday! LINKED IN THE BIO is the latest episode of my HistoryoftheBatmanPodcast where I interview legendary writer Steve Englehart! Englehart's iconic Bronze Age arc now dubbed "Batman: Strange Apparitions" was a direct influence on Tim Burton's 1989 film "Batman" starring Michael Keaton as Bruce Wayne - Batman. Listen to Englehart discuss his experience working on the script and character developments such as Vicki Vale (Kim Basinger) who was inspired by Englehart's Silver St. Cloud! Please check out this episode LINKED IN THE BIO and subscribe to all 74 episodes on iTunes (https:-itun.es-us-DOPM7.c)! Thanks for following and we'll have more History of the Batman soon! ✌🏼💙🦇📽🎙🎧: Afternoon Gothamites and I hope you're all having a spectacular Sunday! LINKED IN THE BIO is the latest episode of my HistoryoftheBatmanPodcast where I interview legendary writer Steve Englehart! Englehart's iconic Bronze Age arc now dubbed "Batman: Strange Apparitions" was a direct influence on Tim Burton's 1989 film "Batman" starring Michael Keaton as Bruce Wayne - Batman. Listen to Englehart discuss his experience working on the script and character developments such as Vicki Vale (Kim Basinger) who was inspired by Englehart's Silver St. Cloud! Please check out this episode LINKED IN THE BIO and subscribe to all 74 episodes on iTunes (https:-itun.es-us-DOPM7.c)! Thanks for following and we'll have more History of the Batman soon! ✌🏼💙🦇📽🎙🎧

Afternoon Gothamites and I hope you're all having a spectacular Sunday! LINKED IN THE BIO is the latest episode of my HistoryoftheBatmanP...

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