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feanor-the-dragon: ginchface: positive-memes: Wholesome Manatees this is actually bullshit trump administration deregulation, the manatee is still in danger. in fact, the trump administration recently weakened the endangered species act in general so that people now have to consider the financial cost of saving a species that may or may not be declared endangered.  remember that an endangered species isn’t governed by like the UN or something, it’s an invention of the american government to protect at-risk species—and they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. Guys! Guys guys guys! WHAT THE F*CK THIS IS THE VERSION YOU NEED TO REBLOG. Here is a link with more recent info. the article linked by previous person was from 2017. This one is from this year and highlights the changes and effects. And here is the official release The biggest change is that protections will be given based on economic considerations. Allegedly, this is to reduce the burden on the american public, which is funny, considering certain things we won’t unpack right here. Have a look, see for yourself. Guys, boost this. : TIME SUBSCRIBE SCIENCE Manatees Are No Longer Listed as Endangered Species Dank Coal Sijposting MANITY RESTORED feanor-the-dragon: ginchface: positive-memes: Wholesome Manatees this is actually bullshit trump administration deregulation, the manatee is still in danger. in fact, the trump administration recently weakened the endangered species act in general so that people now have to consider the financial cost of saving a species that may or may not be declared endangered.  remember that an endangered species isn’t governed by like the UN or something, it’s an invention of the american government to protect at-risk species—and they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. Guys! Guys guys guys! WHAT THE F*CK THIS IS THE VERSION YOU NEED TO REBLOG. Here is a link with more recent info. the article linked by previous person was from 2017. This one is from this year and highlights the changes and effects. And here is the official release The biggest change is that protections will be given based on economic considerations. Allegedly, this is to reduce the burden on the american public, which is funny, considering certain things we won’t unpack right here. Have a look, see for yourself. Guys, boost this.
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Spanish History: 30 Times Tumblr Accidentally Taught Me Something While Making Me Laugh: REI TILtilthat I L TIL that Spain had a king who was so malformed due to incest that he couldn't close his mouth and ended up destroying his entire dynasty via ift.tt neeetsocks thats just how spaniards be whittneydoll hey lil mama lemme whisper in ya ear friendly-neighborhood-patriarch the monumental ugliness of El Hechizado always astonishes me nunyabizni The Hapsburg's were a unique bunch weren't they nobodys-favorite-machinist The Ancestry of King Charles II of Spain (1661-1700) Philip of Castile (1478-1505) Joanna of Castile (1479-1555) Charles V. Holy Roman Emperor (1500-58) Isabella of Portugal (1503-39) Isabella of Burgundy (1501-26 Anna of Bohemia and Hungary (1503-47 Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (1503-64) Christian I of Denmark (1481-1559) Philip of Spain (1527-96) Christina of Denmark (1522-90) Anne of Albert V, Duke Habsburg of Bavaria (1528-90) (1528-79) Mana of Spain (1528-1603) Charles of Austria (1540-90) Maximillan II, Holy Roman Emperor (1527-76) Francis 1, Duke of Lorraine (1517-45 Anne of Austria (1549-80) Maria Anna of Bavaria (1551-1608) Renata of Lorraine (1544-1602) William V, Duke of Bavaria (1548-1626) Margarita of Austria (1584-1611) Philip I of Spain (1578-1621) Maria Anna of Bavaria Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor (1578-1637) (1574-1616 Maria Anna of Spain (1606-46 Philip V of Spain (1605-65) Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor (1608-57) Manana of Austria (1634-96 Charles l of Spain (1661-1700) His family tree was a fucking Christmas wreath. his body "did not contain a single drop of blood his heart was the size of a peppercorn short lame, epileptic senile his lungs corroded: his intestines rotten and gangrenous; completely bald before 35 he had a single testicle, black as coal, always on the verge of death, he repeatedly bafled Christendom by continuing to live his head was ul fwater In case you wanted to know what his coroner thought of him. Spanish History: 30 Times Tumblr Accidentally Taught Me Something While Making Me Laugh
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coal: Stavanger Eldar Setre (Equinor) Grethe Moen (Petoro) THE DECOLONIAL ATLAS Copenhagen Søren Skou (Maersk) Calgary Doug Suttles (Encana) Rob Peabody (Husky Energy) Steve Williams (Suncor) Donald Lindsay (Teck) Tim Mckay (Canadian Natural) Moscow Alexey Miler (Gazprom Igor Sechin (Rosneft) Vagit Alekperov (Lukoil) Vadimir Bogdanov (Surgutneftegas) Viadimir Rashevsky (SUEK) Almetyevsk Tarko-Sale Surgut Leonid Mikhelson (Novatek) Vancouver Den Haag Ben van Beurden (Royal Dutch Shell) Nail Maganov (Tatneft) Ekibastuz Nikolay Korsakov (Bogatyr Komir) Katowice Krzysztof Sedakowski (Polska Grupa G Findlay Colin Marshall (Cloud Peak Energy) Gary Heminger (Marathon) Cleveland Gillette Pyongyang London Bob Dudey (BPy Jean-Sábastien Jacques (Rio Tinto) bae(KazMunayGas) Beijing Mun Myong-hak (Ministry of Coal) Dai Houliang (Sinopec) Li Fanrong (CNOOC) Ling Wen (China Energy) Zhang Jianhua (CNPC) Sauat Mynbayev (KazMunayGas) New York Alfred Rankin (NACCOohn Hess (Hess) Karviná Boleslav Kowalczyk (OKD) K TEK) Ashgabat Omaha Denver Michael Hutchinson (Westmoreland Coal) St LouRobert Murray (Mumray Energy) Glenn Kellow (Peabody) Essen Rolf Martin Schmitz (RWE) Pittsburgh John Eaves (Arch Coa Nicholas Delulis (Consol Energy) Kingsport David Stetson (Alpha Natural Resources) Ashirguli Begliyev (TurkmenGaz) Dovletdurdy Hadzhyev (Turkmennebit) Tehran Masoud Karbasian (National Iranian Oil) Baghdad Tokyo Shunichi Nakaigawa (Inpex) Bay Area Mike Wirth (Chevron) Paris Tulsa Patrick Pouyanné (Total) Joseph Craft (Alliance Resource Partners) Oklahoma City David Hager (Devon Energy) Doug Lawler (Chesapeake Energy) El Dorado Vienna Zürich Rainer Seele (OMV) Ivan Glasenberg (Glencore) Jabbar Al-luiebi (Iraq National Oil) Dallas Roger Jenkins (Murphy O) Curtis Morgan (Vistra Energy) Darren Woods (ExonMobil) Delhi Kuwait City Shashi Shankar (ONGC) Birmingham Michael Tracy (Drummond) Damascus Hashem Hashem (KPC) Kolkata Roma Wase Al-Himed (SPC) Abu Dhabi Madrid Josu lmaz (Repsol) Claudio Descalzi (Enl Anil Kumar Jha (Coal India) Houston ) Dammam Ahmed Al Jaber (ADNOC) Amin Nasser (Saudi Aramco) Kothagudem Corbin Robertson (Natural Resource Partners) David Stover (Noble Energy) John Christmann (Apache) Muscat Algiers Rachid Hachichi (Sonatrach) Bangkok Somruedee Chaimongkol (Banpu) Bahrain Raoul Restucci (PDO) Sni Sridhar (SCCL) México Octavio Romero (Pemex) AWalker (Anadarko Petroleum) Cairo Pete Bartiett (BAPCO) Tripoli Tarek El Molla (EGPC) Doha Ryan Lance (ConocoPhilips) Wiliam Way (Southwestern Energy) William Thomas (EOG Resources) Mustafa Sanalla (Libya NOC) Saad Sherida A-Kaabi (QP) Kuala Lumpur Wan Zulkiflee (Pefronas) Abuja Maikanti Baru (Nigerian National Petroleum) Caracas Bogotá Manuel Quevedo (Petróleos de Venezuela) Felipe Bayon (Ecopetrol) Quito Marcelo Proano (Petroecuador) Balikpapan Garibaldi Thohir (Adaro Energy) Palembang Luanda Carlos Saturnino (Sonangol) Arviyan Arifin (Bukit Asam) Jakarta Bob Kamandanu (Berau Coal Energy) Arsjad Rasjid (Indika Energy) Kurnia Ariawan (Kideco) Nicke Widyawati (Pertamina Saptari Hoedaja (Bumi Resources) Johannesburg-Pretoria Mark Cutifani (Anglo American) Mxolisi Mgojo (Exxaro) Stephen Comell (Sasol) Rio de Janeiro Roberto Castello Branco (Petrobras) Buenos Aires Daniel González (YPF) Melbourne Andrew Mackenzie (BHP) 100 companies are responsible for most of the world's greenhouse gas emissions These are the NAMES AND LOCATIONS of their executives Country sizes depict cumulative CO2 emissions from 1850-2011
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coal: Keaton Patti @KeatonPatti I forced a bot to watch over 1,000 hours of Trump rallies and then asked it to write a Trump rally of its own. Here is the first page TRUMP RALLY INT. BIG ARBY 'S IN SOUTH WYOMKLAHOMA PRESIDENT TRUMP forces himself on a podium PRESIDENT TRUMP I just had a phone call with the economy. Jobs poured out of the phone. Great jobs. Tall jobs. steve Jobs. All at Kinko's The crowd cheers. It is full of real Americans (man with hard hat, man with harder hat, gun that is alive) PRESIDENT TRUMP (CONT'D) The United Snakes is doing so good. other countries are on fire. All the people on fire. Hot fire too. Not us. Our flag is so beautiful. President Trump salutes a flag that says: ARBY'S FOOD IS FINE TO EAT. The crowd howls. They love this flag of America. PRESIDENT TRUMP (CONT'D) I signed a bill. No more swamp. Swamp gone. Swamp is in Mexico now. It's on fire. Great deal for us The crowd chants: FOUR MORE SWAMPS! FOUR MORE SWAMPS! PRESIDENT TRUMP (CONT D) Foreign powers cheat us Canada steals our milk. China steals our milk. We only had one glass of milk left! Obama drank it. Not fair The crowd b s. They wanted that milk PRESIDENT TRUMP (CONT'D) But like President Ronald Rogaine, I will bring back the milk! The crowd roars. They still want that milk PRESIDENT TRUMP (CONT'D) A wall of milk. No criminals get through. Democrats want criminals to have the milk. No way. Milk comes from coal. We'll dig it up. All of the words are mispronounced. The crowd cheers. They hate pronunciations. They love milk. They start digging
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awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source] : Agriculture Nature awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source]

awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Onl...

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bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source] I just have to add–that extensive root system? It’s not just how the plant eats, and how it keeps itself from getting pulled out of the ground during storms, or dying when its aboveground portion is eaten… it’s how it talks to its friends and family, how it shares food with its friends and family, and more than likely, how it thinks. That’s a whole plant brain we’ve domesticated away, leaving a helpless organism that has trouble figuring out when it’s under attack by pests, what to do about it, has very little in the way of chemical defense so it can do something about it, and can’t even warn its neighbors. Even apart from the ecological concerns, what we’ve done is honestly pretty cruel. Here’s some more articles on this too!https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/may/02/plants-talk-to-each-other-through-their-rootshttp://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internethttps://www.the-scientist.com/features/plant-talk-38209Whether or not you think this should qualify as a form of “intelligence” as we know it (which in itself as a pretty nebulous and poorly defined thing), plants exhibit complicated interactive behaviors that help them grow and thrive, and the way we harvest a lot of them for our produce just doesn’t even give them a chance to reach their maturity and begin trading nutrients the way they’re supposed to.: Agriculture Nature bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source] I just have to add–that extensive root system? It’s not just how the plant eats, and how it keeps itself from getting pulled out of the ground during storms, or dying when its aboveground portion is eaten… it’s how it talks to its friends and family, how it shares food with its friends and family, and more than likely, how it thinks. That’s a whole plant brain we’ve domesticated away, leaving a helpless organism that has trouble figuring out when it’s under attack by pests, what to do about it, has very little in the way of chemical defense so it can do something about it, and can’t even warn its neighbors. Even apart from the ecological concerns, what we’ve done is honestly pretty cruel. Here’s some more articles on this too!https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/may/02/plants-talk-to-each-other-through-their-rootshttp://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internethttps://www.the-scientist.com/features/plant-talk-38209Whether or not you think this should qualify as a form of “intelligence” as we know it (which in itself as a pretty nebulous and poorly defined thing), plants exhibit complicated interactive behaviors that help them grow and thrive, and the way we harvest a lot of them for our produce just doesn’t even give them a chance to reach their maturity and begin trading nutrients the way they’re supposed to.

bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the...

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