🔥 Popular | Latest

Home, E.T., and Character: In E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) the character Elliot yawns shortly after bringing E.T. into his home, this is because he is nodding off.

In E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) the character Elliot yawns shortly after bringing E.T. into his home, this is because he is nodding off...

Save
Being Alone, Doctor, and Empire: When you realize Endgame isn't even in the top 25 grossing films when including inflation: DOMESTIC GROSSES Adjusted for Ticket Price Inflation* DOMESTIC GROSSES Adjusted for Ticket Price Inflation* Note This chart only shows the top 300 movies, regardless of sorting Year* MGM 1,822,598,200 $200,852 579 1939 Fox 81,604,857,600 $460,998,007 1977 Fox ธ1,283,791,300 $159,287,539 1965 Uni ธ1,278, 107,600 s435) 10,554 1982^ Par ,221,303,800 $659,363,944 1997 Par $1,180,310,000 $65,500,000 1956 Uni ธ1,153,990,200 $250,000,000 1975 MGM 1,118,460,500 $111,721,910 1965 996,498,500 $232,906,145 1973 10 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs DS $982,090,000 $184925,486 1937" 974117,000 $936,6622252015 Da ธ900,254,400 $144880014 1967 Fox #884,607,500 $290,475067 1980 MGM $883,402,600 $74 422,622 1959 Fox 876,759,300 760,507,625 2009 Fox $847,475,300 8309,306,177 1983 825,894,500 $402,828 120 1993 Fox 813,711,800 474,544677 1999 Tite (cick to view) Studio Adjusted Gross Unadjusted 1 Gone with the Wind 2 Star Wars 3 The Sound of Music E.T:The Extra-Terrestrial 5 Titanic 6 The Ten Commandments Doctor Zhivago The Exorcist WB Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2 101 Dalmatians 13 The Empire Strikes Back 14 Ben-Hur BV 6 Return of the Jed 17 Jurassic Park 18 Star Wars Episodel-The Phantom 9 The Lion King 20 The Sing Raiders of the Lost Ark 22 The Graduate 23 Fantasia 24 Jurassic World 25 The Godfather 26 Forrest Gump 27 Mary Poppins 28 Grease 9 Marve's The Avengers 30 Black Panher Thunderball 32 The Dark Knight 33 The Jungle Book 4 Sleeping Beauty 5 Avengers: Infinity War 36 Avengers: Endgame 7 Ghostbusters 38 Shrek 2 39 40 Love Story Spider-Man 42 Independence Day 43 Home Alone 44 Star Wars: The Last Jed Menace 803,209,300 422,783,777 1994 803,177,100 $156000,000 1973 Par $797,776400 $248,159,971 1981 AVCO $771,047,200 $104945305 1967 Ds 748,221,700 $76,408 097 1941 Uni $712,233300 9652,270,625 2015 Par $711,092,300 $134966 411 1972 Pw $708,317,800 ธ330,252,182 1994 Dis $704 418,200 $102,272,727 1964 694,658,000 $189,969,103 1978 $692,699,700 $623,357,910 2012 687,213,600 $700,059,566 2018 673,948,000 63,595658 1965 WB 671,299,400 $535,234033 2008 Dis ธ663,856,000 $141,843,612 1967" Dis $654,811,300 $51,600,000 1959 652,501,800 678,815482 2018 2019 2018 Col ธ641,275,300 8242212,467 1984 DW $640,168,900 $441,226,247 2004 Fox ธ635,726,300 $102,308,889 1969 630,683,300 $106,397,186 1970 Sony s626,057,600 $403,706,375 2002 Fox $624,112,600 $306,169.268 1996 Fox ธ610,285,100$285761,243 1990 $609,026,300 9620,181,382 2017 BV Par BV BV UA BV 644,506,419 BV Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Reality is often disappernting We've been lied to!

We've been lied to!

Save
80s, Blockbuster, and Children: tie sylB8l 8f the decade was t Ubbhher with a college education, a well-paying job and expensive taste. Many people the yuppie a baby derided yuppies for being self-centered and materialistic, and surveys of young urban professionals across the country showed that they were, indeed, mor making money and buying consumer goods than their parents and gr been. However, in some ways yuppiedom was less shallow and super appeared. Popular television shows like "thirtysomething" and mov e concerned with ficial than it es like The Big ght Lights, Big City" depicted a generation of young men and women who y and self-doubt. They were successful, but they weren't sure were plagued with anxiet they were happy. At the movie theater, the 1980s was the age of the blockbuster. Movies like 'E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial,"(Retur ftheJedi,) "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Beverly Hills Cop appealed to moviegoers of all ages and made hundreds of millions of dollars at the box office. The 1980s was also the heyday of the teen movie. Films like "The Breakfast Club," "Some Kind of Wonderful" and "Pretty in Pink" are still popular today At home, people watched family sitcoms like "The Cosby Show," "Family Ties Roseanne" and "Married... with Children." They also rented movies to watch on their new VCRs. By the end of the 1980s, 60 percent of American television owners got cable service-and the most revolutionary cable network of all was MTV, which mad debut on August 1, 1981. The music videos the network played made stars out ot like Duran Duran and Culture Club and made megastars out of artists like Micha Jackson (1958-2009), whose elaborate "Thriller" video helped sell 600,000 albu the five days after its first broadcast. MTV also influenced fashion: People acro d arnund the world) did their best to copy the hairstyles and fashio a (1958-) became (and r The 80s were a good time

The 80s were a good time

Save
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
Save
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
Save
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
Save
E.T., Set, and Extra: On the set of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

On the set of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

Save
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
Save
Memes, Vine, and Vines: E.T the Extra Terrestrial (1982) OC dankmeme lit nochill humour vines fails cringe cringeworthy hilarious funny lol haha starterpack softdrinks dankestmemerinos

OC dankmeme lit nochill humour vines fails cringe cringeworthy hilarious funny lol haha starterpack softdrinks dankestmemerinos

Save