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Children, Cute, and Facts: pervocracy child handling for the childless urse My current job has me working with children, which is kind of a weird shock after years in environments where a young" patient is 40 years old. Here's my impressions so far Birth 1 year: Essentially a smail cute animal. Handle accordingly, gently and affectionately, but relying heavily on the caregivers and with no real expectation of cooperation Age 1-2: Hates you. Hates you so much. You can smile, you can coo, you can attempt to soothe they hate you anyway, because you're a stranger and you're scary and you're touching them. There's no winning this so just get it over with as quickly and non-traumatically as possible Age 3-5: Nervous around medical things, but possible to soothe. Easily upset but also easily distracted from the thing that upset them. Smartphone cartoons and who wants a stickerrl1?1? are key management techniques Age 6 10: Really cool, actually. I did not realize kids were this cool. Around this age they tend to be fairly outgoing, and super curious and eager to learn. Absolutely do not babytalk, instead, flatter them with how grown-up they are teach them some Fun Gross Medical Facts, and introduce potentially frightening experiences with hey, you want to see something really cool?" Age 11 14: Extremely variable. Can be very childish or very mature, or rapidly switch from one mode to the other. At this point you can almost treat them as an adult, just... a really sensitive and unpredictable adult Do not, under any circumstances, offer stickers. (But they might grab one out of the bin anyway.) Age 15-18: Basically an adult with severely limited life experience. Treat as an adult who needs a littie extra education with their care. Keep parents out of the room as much as possible, unless the kid wants them there. At this point you can go ahead and offer stickers again, because they'll probably think it's funny And they'll want one. Deep down, everyone wants a sticker nurse unlocks secret to raising kids

nurse unlocks secret to raising kids

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Children, Cute, and Facts: pervocracy child handling for the childless nurse My current job has me working with children, which is kind of a weird shock after years in environments where a "young" patient is 40 years old. Here's my impressions so far: Birth 1 year: Essentially a small cute animal Handle accordingly; gently and affectionately, but relying heavily on the caregivers and with no real expectation of cooperation. Age 1- 2: Hates you. Hates you so much. You can smile, you can coo, you can attempt to soothe; they hate you anyway, because you're a stranger and you're scary and you're touching them. There's no winning this so just get it over with as quickly and non- traumatically as possible. Age 3-5: Nervous around medical things, but possible to soothe. Easily upset, but also easily distracted from the thing that upset them Smartphone cartoons and "who wants a sticker?!!?!?" are key management techniques. Age 6- 10: Really cool, actually. I did not realize kids were this cool. Around this age they tend to be fairly outgoing, and super curious and eager to learn. Absolutely do not babytalk; instead, flatter them with how grown-up they are, teach them some Fun Gross Medical Facts, and introduce potentially frightening experiences with "hey, you want to see something really cool?" Age 11 14: Extremely variable. Can be very childish or very mature, or rapidly switch from one mode to the other. At this point you can almost treat them as an adult, just... a really sensitive and unpredictable adult. Do not, under any circumstances, offer stickers. (But they might grab one out of the bin anyway.) Age 15 18: Basically an adult with severely limited life experience. Treat as an adult who needs a little extra education with their care Keep parents out of the room as much as possible, unless the kid wants them there. At this point you can go ahead and offer stickers again, because they'll probably think it's funny. And they'll want one. Deep down, everyone wants a sticker. mikkeneko This is also a pretty excellent guide to writing kids of various ages Child handling for nurses

Child handling for nurses

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Black History Month, Children, and Life: <p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p> <p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. </p> <p>While Georgia had harsh laws against the education of slaves, Susie attended two secret schools taught by black women as a young girl and learned the rudiments of literacy. Later she was educated by two white youths who knowingly broke the law. In April 1862 She and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While there, her education became known and she was asked to teach at a freedman&rsquo;s school, teaching freed slave children how to read. At night, many adults would also come to her, eager to learn. She eventually married a black Union soldier and served in the army as a nurse, as well as educating the soldiers. </p> <p>For more information, visit this website: <a href="http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912">http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912</a></p>

Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to ...

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