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Amazon, Facebook, and Family: Agriculture Nature bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source] I just have to add–that extensive root system? It’s not just how the plant eats, and how it keeps itself from getting pulled out of the ground during storms, or dying when its aboveground portion is eaten… it’s how it talks to its friends and family, how it shares food with its friends and family, and more than likely, how it thinks. That’s a whole plant brain we’ve domesticated away, leaving a helpless organism that has trouble figuring out when it’s under attack by pests, what to do about it, has very little in the way of chemical defense so it can do something about it, and can’t even warn its neighbors. Even apart from the ecological concerns, what we’ve done is honestly pretty cruel. Here’s some more articles on this too!https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/may/02/plants-talk-to-each-other-through-their-rootshttp://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internethttps://www.the-scientist.com/features/plant-talk-38209Whether or not you think this should qualify as a form of “intelligence” as we know it (which in itself as a pretty nebulous and poorly defined thing), plants exhibit complicated interactive behaviors that help them grow and thrive, and the way we harvest a lot of them for our produce just doesn’t even give them a chance to reach their maturity and begin trading nutrients the way they’re supposed to.

bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the mo...

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Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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America, Books, and Deer: MAKE AMERICA AN ENDLESS EXPANSE OF OLD-GROWTH FOREST WITH NO CERTAIN BORDERS AGAIN virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples. This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine. Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow. That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England.  Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment. Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first.  Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false

virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an e...

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