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dressesandyarn: magicalhomesandstuff: What’s encrypting your internet surfing? An algorithm created by a supercomputer? Well, if the site you’re visiting is encrypted by the cyber security firm Cloudflare, your activity may be protected by a wall of lava lamps. Cloudflare covers websites for Uber, OKCupid, & FitBit, for instance. The wall of  lamps in the San Francisco headquarters generates a random code. Over 100  lamps, in a variety of colors, and their patterns deter hackers from accessing data.   As the lava lamps bubble and swirl, a video camera on the ceiling monitors their unpredictable changes and connects the footage to a computer, which converts the randomness into a virtually unhackable code. Codes created by machines have relatively predictable patterns, so it’s possible for hackers to guess their algorithms, posing a security risk. Lava lamps, add to the equation the sheer randomness of the physical world, making it nearly impossible for hackers to break through. You might think that this would be kept secret, but it’s not. Simply go in and ask to see the lava lamp display. By allowing people to affect the video footage, human movement, static, and changes in lighting from the windows work together to make the random code even harder to predict. So, by standing in front of the display, you add an additional variable to the code, making it even harder to hack. Isn’t that interesting?  via atlasobscura.com What the fuck. : 2017 Google CLOUDFLARE dressesandyarn: magicalhomesandstuff: What’s encrypting your internet surfing? An algorithm created by a supercomputer? Well, if the site you’re visiting is encrypted by the cyber security firm Cloudflare, your activity may be protected by a wall of lava lamps. Cloudflare covers websites for Uber, OKCupid, & FitBit, for instance. The wall of  lamps in the San Francisco headquarters generates a random code. Over 100  lamps, in a variety of colors, and their patterns deter hackers from accessing data.   As the lava lamps bubble and swirl, a video camera on the ceiling monitors their unpredictable changes and connects the footage to a computer, which converts the randomness into a virtually unhackable code. Codes created by machines have relatively predictable patterns, so it’s possible for hackers to guess their algorithms, posing a security risk. Lava lamps, add to the equation the sheer randomness of the physical world, making it nearly impossible for hackers to break through. You might think that this would be kept secret, but it’s not. Simply go in and ask to see the lava lamp display. By allowing people to affect the video footage, human movement, static, and changes in lighting from the windows work together to make the random code even harder to predict. So, by standing in front of the display, you add an additional variable to the code, making it even harder to hack. Isn’t that interesting?  via atlasobscura.com What the fuck.
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
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