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Being Alone, Apparently, and Bad: Sp3ctre7171 points 3 hours ago You are absolutely correct 1) Miro learned to use the mobility of Winston, as well as his primal, to invent modern dive. He learned all of the tips and tricks and extracted extra value out of the hero that few realized was there. In doing so, he created a role that used main tank as an offensive centerpiece and threat to the backline, and all of a sudden flank heroes weren't alone. A poorly protected ana in the back could be beset by multiple members of the enemy team without much warning. However, this required both new gamesense from miro, and innovations in lucio play from Tobi. Specifically, tobi was able to peel for jehong better than many players thought was possible, compensating for the lack of defensive shields. The compounding innovation led to LH being an offensive threat at every position, and it made it possible for them to do the miraculous turnarounds that defined their APEX championship runs Playing against them was exhausting, as is expected from a team where any one member can wipe you out if left unchecked. 2) Gesture's contribution was twofold. Firstly, he extracted more value out of winston's kit on the defensive side, learning how to use primal both to continue an attack, and to peel for his own back line, which leads into his second main development. That being, under Gesture the final decision was made to transfer shotcalling duties from the main support (lucio and later mercy) and onto the main tank, primarily because engagements were no longer dictated by speed boost, but by the dive from the main tank. Together with the rest of GC Busan, Gesture planned, called, and executed crisp dives that were far better timed and aimed than those of old LH. Whereas Miro's dives were a terror because you would be under attack from multiple divers, the style that Gesture led the way on involved being instantly deleted by a full dive, where a healer pair could be hit with burst from multiple heroes in the same instant. This in turn changed the Winston interplay into a mind game, where there was a choice to be made between deleting the enemy's backline and attempting to save your own. Winston players were forced to learn how to make each leap and pincer engage perfect, or they would simply lose the fight Permalink Embed Save Parent Report Give Gold Reply Sp3ctre7160 points 3 hours ago (Continued) 3) what guxue is introducing is a Winston as the focus of a dive, not just the linchpin. While that sounds like the same thing previously, the Winston would be used to coordinate dives and call the timing, but with Guxue, resources are poured into the Winston to make sure that he can have offensive value. Both because Winston can do damage to the whole team at once (and thus build ult insanely fast against teams pocketing a zen, or against GOATS comps), but also because Winston can simultaneously disrupt the escape methods for healers AND bypass most of the ways in which healers are protected, such as matrix and shields Guxue's innovations are most similar to miro's in that they are mostly focused on a single player's style and that one hero's impact in a game. Changing the offensive presence of a hero is impactful and increases the visible skill gap between good and bad teams, but the effects are mostly limited to that one hero. For that reason, I think that the innovations brought forth by Gesture (and many others) are the most important to the development of modern Winston play, in that they represented a fundamental change in the whole shotcalling and tactical philosophy of dive teams, and opened the gates to the more complex and match specific strategies that we saw in the overwatch league owldesk: some really good tank playstyle analysis on reddit (as a side note, this guy is apparently gonna have analysis articles out soon and you better BELIEVE i’m gonna link them bc if they’re anything like this write up they’ll be great)

owldesk: some really good tank playstyle analysis on reddit (as a side note, this guy is apparently gonna have analysis articles out soon a...

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College, Dude, and Future: Every graduating senior is scared, to some degree, of the future, but this was on a different level. When my class left our liberal arts experience, we scattered to temporary gigs: I worked at a dude ranch; another friend nannied for the summer; one got a job on a farm in New Zealand; others became raft guides and transitioned to ski instructors. We didn't think our first job was important; it was just a job and would eventually, meanderingly lead to The Job. But these students were convinced that their first job out of college would not only determine their career trajectory, but also their intrinsic value for the rest of their lives. I told one student, whose dozens of internship and fellowship applications yielded no results, that she should move somewhere fun, get any job, and figure out what interests her and what kind of work she doesn't want to do - a suggestion that prompted wailing. "But what'll I tell my parents?" she said. "I want a cool job I'm passionate about!" Those expectations encapsulate the millennial rearing project, in which students internalize the need to find employment that reflects well on their parents (steady, decently paying, recognizable as a "good job") that's also impressive to their peers (at a "cool" company) and fulfills what they've been told has been the end goal of all of this childhood optimization: doing work that you're passionate about. Whether that job is as a professional sports player, a Patagonia social media manager, a programmer at a startup, or a partner at a law firm seems to matter less than checking all of those boxes. What's worse, the feeling of accomplishment that follows an exhausting task passing the final! Finishing the massive work project! - never comes. "The exhaustion experienced in burnout combines an intense yearning for this state of completion with the tormenting sense that it cannot be attained that there is always some demand or anxiety or distraction which can't be silenced," Josh Cohen, a psychoanalyst specializing in burnout, writes. "You josieandthepussycatsofficial: reading this article is like staring into a mirror https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-work
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